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Full text of "Some Terre Haute phizes"

CSENEALCGV COLLECTION 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02293 3946 



Some Terre Haute Phizes 

■g, ."J- (^^^ i ^ LOO ^^ 

, Lulc^s 



1113153 

/I FEW WORDS ABOUT THIS BOOK 



'H^HIS portfolio of little cartoons, showing "Some Terre Haute Phizes," has 
no mission whatsoever except to provide a little entertainment for those 
who examine its pages, and, incidentally, to assist the boys who published it 
to pay their next winter's coal bills with the proceeds. In giving the history 
of the men whose faces appear in this volume, we havn't pried into their 
family affairs. Information of that bind is carefully recorded in family Bibles 
and the county clerk's boohs: we would suggest that you interview the neigh- 
bors if you want to find out their faults. 

We hope everybody in Terre Haute will like the book. If you do not fancy 
it, please don't tell us about it, as we have done the best we could, and your 
criticism might make us sad. 

E. M. L. 

Terre Haute, Indiana, Julu. 1905. B. J. 6. 



Oh wad some power the giftie gie us 
To see oursel's as others see us ! 
It wad frae monie a bUinder free us 
And foolish notion. 

— Bobbie Burns. 



EDWIN J. BIDAMAN 



NATIVES of the Buckeye state seem to have a happy 
faculty of "making good" when it comes to poUtics, 
and Edwin J. Bidaman, whom no one ever suspected 
of being a poUtician, became mayor of Terre Haute by a 
good big majority in 1904. From the rolling mill up 
through the police department to the mayoralty chair is 
quite an achievement, and only ])ossible in the United 
States. 

Youngstown, Ohio, is tlie birthplace of Mr. Bidaman. 
After a residence there of six years he moved with his 
parents to Sharon, Pennsylvania, where he received some 
schooling and then entered a rolling mill. He was simply 
following the trade of the family and it was l)ut natural 
that he should take up this line of work. He came to 
Terre Haute in 1876 and secured employment at the old 
nail mill and followed the iron business until 1881. Then 
for three years he was in the west. Returning to Terre 
Haute, and for a time being in the employ of the Vandalia 
railroad company, he was appointed a patrolman on the 
])olice force under Mayor Kolsem. He received two pro- 
motions, those of sergeant and detective, and quit the 
force in 1902. In 1902 Mr. Bidaman associated himself 
with Charles Heggarty in the grocery business at Seventh 
street and Lafayette avenue. He became a candidate for 
mayor in 1904. By a majority of 1,612 votes, the largest 
majority ever given a republican mayoralty candidate, he 
was elected chief executive of the city, and greatly sur- 
prising the opposition. Old politicians were given a "solar 
plexus" that required months to recover from. 

Mr. Bidaman is entitled to the credit of cleaning up the 
city morally and physically, in the most thorough manner 
that it has experienced for years. As a behever in munici- 
pal ownership, the mayor has investigated the electric 
lighting business and has reached the conclusion that the 
city can operate such a plant and give a good service to 
the public at a reasonable cost. He has advanced views 
on other subjects effecting the municipality. His honor 
is a Mason, a Forester, a Knights of Pythias and a member 
of the Uniform Rank Company No. 3. 





SPENCER F. BALL 



OPENCER F. BALL was busy enough when he was the 
business manager of the Gazette, one of tlie best 
newspapers that Terre Haute ever liad, and it was 
thought possible he niiglit relax just a little after the 
Gazette was discontinued, but lie hasn't. He is just as 
busy as ever. 

As a trustee of the Savings Bank and a meniljer of the 
finance committee, secretary and treasurer of the Terre 
Haute Automobile Company, president of the Krumbhaar 
Land Company, and chairman of the manufacturing com- 
mittee of the Commercial Chili, time does not drag on his 
hands, yet he is one of the most active meinliers of the 
Terre Haute Literary cluli and kee])s alireast of all that 
is going on in this very interesting world. Mr. Ball has 
not neglected his social side and is also jiresident of the 
Country Club. He likes the ,<;anie of .golf very well but 
does not point with pride to liis record on the links. "My 
game is really a joke," said Mr. Ball in speaking of the 
sport. 

Mr. Ball is a native of Terre Haute and grew u]) in the 
newspaper liusiness. While yel a l)oy lie carried the old 
Mail, and after graduating from the lii.^li school liecame 
route manager for the Gazelle, which was tlien owned 
by Mr. W. C. Ball and John S. Dickersen. For a time he 
added lo his duties by keeping books for the Daily Journal 
and in 1874 became one of the owners of the Gazette, At 
the time of his retirement from the newspaper business 
he had been associated with his brother, Mr. W, C. Ball, 
in the publicaticm of the Gazette for thirty years. He is 
a "tarilT for revenue onlv and a sound monev democrat." 



NICHOLAS FILBECK 



THE fact that politicians have always been welcome at 
the Filbeck house has tended to add to its popularity. 
Mr. Filbeck himself is not averse to talking pohtics, 
and he has always taken an interest more or less in the 
Vigo game. Politics is a real science in this particular 
locality and it requires a great deal of discussion, as a rule, 
to perfect the different moves that will result in victory 
for the party. 

Vernheim, Hesse Darmstadt, Germany, is the place 
where Nicholas Filbeck was born and he l:)ecame a resident 
of Indianapolis when he was three years of age. In 1853, 
ten years later, his parents moved to Terre Haute and they 
brought Nicholas along with them. Tlie future poUtician 
and hotel keeper attended school, at the Old Seminary and 
the German Lutheran school He worked during his vaca- 
tions in the gnjcery and bakery of his father, Philip Fil- 
Ijeck. When he w-as nearing eighteen years of age he 
enUsted in Company E of the Thirty-second Regiment, 
the German Regiment, and served his country faithfully 
from 1861 to 1864. Mr. Filbeck still carries a reminder 
of the "late unpleasantness," having a lameness of the 
right leg as the result of a bullet wound received at the 
battle of Stone River. When mustered out at Indianapolis 
Mr. Filbeck returned to Terre Haute and took charge of 
the Cincinnati House which he conducted for four years. 
He then purchased the old Monitor at Fifth and Cherry 
streets, managing this hotel from 1869 until 1873, when 
he received his appointment under President Grant as 
postmaster, and also served under President Hayes. In 
1882 he bought back the Monitor and in 1894 erected the 
present modern hotel. In poUtics "N'ick" Filbeck has 
always been a repubUcan and has been county chairman 
and secretary of the county committee. Although not as 
prominently identified with pohtics for the past four years 
as formerly, he still takes considerable interest in the cam- 
]iaigns. In fact he can't very well hel]i doing so. 





CHARLES R. DUFFIN 



SOME people imagine that a telephone can be installed 
within fifteen minutes after an order is given but if 
you will just take the time and listen to Charles R. 
Duffin, general manager of the Citizens Telephone Com- 
pany, he will tell you more about 'phones than you ever 
dreamed of. And he will convince you, too, that it is much 
easier to "string" the people than it is to string wires. 

Mr. Duffin came to Terre Haute in 1876. He was fifteen 
then and had a very hazy idea regarding his future. Pana, 
Illinois, had been his birthplace, and his father, who was 
a railroad contractor, had lived in several different towns 
in Ohio and Indiana. Charlie had received just twenty- 
four months of schooling when he landed in Terre Haute 
and realized that the world was rather a chilly proposition. 
In exchange for something that would satisfy the inner 
man, the boy from Illinois accepted a place in a restaurant. 
Next he was salesman in a secondhand store which after- 
wards became a first-hand store, and the selling ability 
of Mr. Duffin soon attracted attention. For four years 
he traveled and sold goods for the firm of Robinson & 
Sons, wholesale dealers in notions. He spent thirteen 
years in the same capacity for the Fecheimer & Keifer 
Clothing Company, of Cincinnati. During all of this time 
Charlie made up for any lack of education by close study 
and application and developed an ability to see what was 
going on about him. 

He organized the Citizens Telephone Company in 1901. 
This company began as a small institution, but today 
represents an investment of over §200,000. The com- 
pany has nearly two thousand local subscribers and 
furnishes a toll service that is second to none. Mr. 
Duffin is also interested in making Forest Park a popular 
place of recreation. He was the organizer of the Forest 
Park Coal Company. 

When Post G., T. P. A., was estabUshed, Mr. Duffin 
was its first president, and in 1898 was honored by being 
elected National President of the Travelers Protective 
Association. As an organizer Charlie has great ability, 
and he has contributed no httle amount of his time to the 
success of the Terre Haute Trotting Association as its 
secretary. He is one of the dependable hustlers when 
it comes to county fairs and carnivals. Mr. Duffin is a 
member of the Elks, the K. of C. and the K. of P. 



JOHN E. LAMB 



MR LAMB, whom we see here in a characteristic atti- 
tude, is one of the best known members of the Terre 
Haute bar. It perhaps can be said of him that he 
has defended more men charged with murder than any 
other lawyer in the state and undoubtedly has a record 
that few men in criminal cases can offer as a parallel. In 
all of the numerous murder cases, Mr. Lamb has been so 
successful that but two men whom he defended were con- 
victed. 

Mr. Lamb is a native of Terre Haute. L'pon his .£;radua- 
tion from the high school lie was made deputy treasurer 
of the county for two years and during that time studied 
to fit himself for the legal profession. Then he went into 
the law office of Daniel \V. Vorhees and Judge A. B. 
Carlton. He was admitted to the bar in 1873 before he 
was of age. He filled his first public position when he was 
appointed prosecuting attorney by Governor Hendricks. 
Then he was elected to the office in 1876, serving three and 
one-half years. When the law partnership of \'orhees 
and Carlton was dissolved Mr. Lamb became the junior 
partner with Judge Cartlon. He was elected to congress 
in 1882. The district at that time was heavily repubUcan 
but Mr. Lamb received a majority of 280 votes. He served 
in the Forty-eighth congress and was a member of the 
important committee on foreign affiars. Mr. Lamb, fol- 
lowing his congressional term, served one year as district 
attorney under President Cleveland, resigning the position 
to make the race for congress again, but was defeated. 
In 1893 Mr. Lamb formed a partnership with John T. 
Beasley and in 1904 Judge Sawyer was admitted as a mem- 
ber of the firm. Perhaps no firm of attorneys in the state 
enjoys a better reputation in civil law. 

Mr. Lamb has always been active as a democrat. He 
was a delegate to the National convention in 1892 that 
nominated Cleveland. In 1896 he was a delegate to the 
convention that nominated Bryan and in 1904 was a dele- 
gale and chairman of the Indiana delegation wliich nom- 
inated Judge Parker. 





WILLIAM H. WILEY 



D^^r tiiie otlier man in the middle west has a greater 
record for continuous service as a superintendent of 
city schools than William H. Wiley, of Terre Haute. 
For forty years Mr. Wiley has been connected with the 
public schools of the city, thirty-six years of that time as 
superintenednt. 

Mr. A\'iley was born on a farm in Rush county, Indiana, 
in 1842. At seventeen years of age he attended Butler 
University, entering the preparatory department. He was 
graduated after five years, receiving the degree of A. B. 
His master's degree was granted him from the same school 
in 1867. His first years' teaching was in a country school 
and a small academy at State I^inc City. In ISr^.i he 
came to Terre Haute and accepted the ])rincii)alship of the 
Fourth district school in the month of April. He was 
next elected principal of the high school and served four 
years. He became superintendent of the schools June 
i, 1869. When Mr. Wiley came here he was the sixteenth 
teacher to be employed by the school board. Now the 
city has 236 teachers, with 8,700 pupils. The growth of 
the schools has been very great, but there has lieen no 
lack of efficiency in all the years that Mr. Wiley has been 
at their head. 

Superintendent Wiley has been honored by his fellow 
educators several times, having served as president of the 
State Teachers' Association and of the Southern Indiana 
Teachers' Association. He has been a member of the 
Literary club almost from its organization. In church 
work he has been active and is now a member of the board 
of trustees of the Central Christian church. 



FRANK M'KEEN 



IT might be truthfully said of Mr. McKeen that he is a 
"born banker," for he was indeed born within the walls 
of a bank building. The Terre Haute "Branch" of 
the Bank of the State of Indiana, now known as the "Old 
Curiosity Shop," on West Ohio street, was, back in the 
fifties, the most pretentious structure in the old town. Mr. 
W. R. McKeen, father of Mr. Frank MeKeen, was at the 
time of the latter's birth, the cashier of this bank and re- 
sided with his then small family in the residential part of 
the building, and it was while they lived in this building 
tliat Mr. Frank McKeen first saw the light of day. 

After completing the common and high school course of 
study Mr. McKeen went into the banking office of McKeen 
& Minshall, and there he has been ever since except an 
interval of a couple of years during which he visited the 
old countries "across the big pond" and spent a year or 
more in the treasurer's and paymaster's oflice of the Yan- 
dalia railroad. Mr McKeen's achievements however, 
have not been restricted to the banking line, for he has 
been very prominently identified in former years with the 
management of the fairs and race meetings held over the 
Terre Haute race course, his most ambitious elTort in this 
line being the race meeting given by the Vigo Agricultural 
society, of which Mr. McKeen was at the time the president 
and leading factor, in 1894. The total amount of the 
purses and stakes raced for during that six days meeting 
was the enormous sum of §93,000, being the largest amount 
ever contested for by harness horses at any one week meet- 
ing in this country. It still holds this record. This meet- 
ing also cleared more profit for the association than any 
meeting ever held over the Terre Haute track, the result- 
ing profit amounting to between $18,000 and $19,000, the 
association at the time being in hopeless bankruptcy until 
this great meeting put it once more on its feet. The bank- 
ing business originally founded by McKeen & Tousey in 
1855, and of which during the past fifty years Mr. \V. R. 
McKeen has continuously been its senior partner, will this 
fall desert the constantly diminishing list of private bank- 
ers and will become the McKeen National Bank of Terre 
Haute, with a combined capital and surplus of $500,000. 
The management will continue as heretofore and the bank 
remains as in the past, in tlie fnmt rank of our financial 
institutions. 





CRAWFORD FAIRBANKS 



ALTHOUGH identified with a large numljer of different 
companies, having extensive interests in many 
different places, and a man of large affairs, Crawford 
Fairbanks is essentially a Terre Hautean in every sense of 
the word. Perhaps no single citizen has a wider acquaint- 
ance over the country than Mr. Fairbanks. His position 
in the business world is an important one and he has done 
mucli to l)enefit his native city. A timely gift, and one 
very mucli appreciated by Terre Haute is the Emeline 
F'airbanks Memorial Library, which is now under con- 
struction. This handsome structure when completed will 
represent an outlay of nearly $75,000. As a memorial to 
his mother, Mr. Fairbanks could liave not ])erformed a 
more gracious act and one that will be more lasting in its 
good. 

Mr. F'airbanks was born in Terre Haute April 25, 184,-i. 
His father, Henry Fairbanks, was one of the best known 
of Terre Haute's early citizens, and at the time of his 
death was mayor of the city. Mr. Fairbanks received a 
conunon school education and began work in life very early. 
At the outlireak of the civil war he enlisted in the 12')th 
Indiana Infantry and was a first lieutenant. He was with 
Sherman in his march to the sea and left the service with 
an excellent record. For several years he was in the grain 
business and then engaged in distilling. He operated the 
plant of the Terre Haute Distilling Company for several 
years and in 1889 organized the Terre Haute 1-lrewing 
Company, now operating one of the ten largest breweries 
in the LTnited States. 

Mr. Fairbanks is never too Imsy to give a word of advice 
to worthy young men and many a young man has risen 
to a place of affluence and usefulness through his assist- 
ance. He is a member of the Masonic order, the Benev- 
olent and Protective Order cjf Klks, the Loyal Legion and 
the Crand Army of the Republic. 



SAMUEL E. GRAY 



pOSTMASTER SAMUEL E. GRAY has actually carried 
the mail and the accompanying sketch is no 
exaggeration so far as tlie performance of such a 
duty is concerned. .Several times business men have been 
waited on by the ])ostmastcr who has taken the place of a 
sick carrier and thus maintained the etTiciency of the ser- 
vice. 

Mr. Gray enjoys an extensive ac<|uaintance in the 
country as well as in the city, proljably because he was 
reared <m a farm and is more or less interested in agricul- 
ture. He first saw the light of day on a farm four miles 
east of the city, and is not ashamed of the fact that he 
followed the ])lovv, mowed the hay and shucked the corn, 
thus building up for himself a strong and rugged constitu- 
tion that has served him well in public life. In 1892 the 
future postmaster moved to the city and began putting 
on city airs. He became a deputy in the office of County 
Auditor James Souler in 1895 and still continued to culti- 
vate the friendship of the farmers which stood him in good 
stead when he was appointed postmaster in 1901 upon the 
recommendation of Congressman Holliday. Mr. Gray 
filled the bill so well that no opposition developed to his 
re-appointment and he is now serving his second term in 
an office that will soon rank second in the state. 

While not aspiring to a military career the postmaster 
has had such honors thrust upon him. He has served as 
captain of Canton McKeen and has filled every chair from 
vice-grand to representative in the Grand Lodge of the 
Odd Fellows. He also belongs to a half dozen other lodges 
among them the Elks. The postmaster loves good Jersey 
cattle and is a crank on pacing horses. 





ADOLPH HERZ 



IT is rather difficult to imagine Mr. Herz seated in a boat 
trolling for bass, with a small boy furnishing the 
steam for the paddles, but Terre Hauteans who have 
been to Lake Maxinkuckee report that they have seen 
a living picture very nmch like this. We say it is difficult 
to imagine Mr. Herz enjoying a vacation, for he is about 
the busiest man in town when at the Herz Bazaar or on 
his way to a meeting of the Commercial Club. Mr. Herz 
possesses the happy faculty of leaving business cares be- 
hind when he goes to his summer cottage and naturally 
when he returns to the store with his face and arms 
tanned he feels like knuckling down to business for a spell. 

vSchw. Halle, W'urlemberg, Germany, was the birth- 
place of Mr. Herz. Tlie future Terre Haute merchant 
was born in 184.3. While yet a boy he had his eyes on 
the New World and succeeded in landing in New \'ork 
City in the year 1866. He was in the east liut a year 
when he journeyed on west to Terre Haute. He was 
favorably impressed with the town and decided to remain. 
He was first in the employ of Joseph Erlanger, merchant 
tailor and embarked in business forliimself in 1869,estal5- 
lishing a store on South Fourtli street lietween W'abasli 
avenue and Ohio street. Tlien he moved to Wabash 
avenue where he could cater to a larger trade. The Herz 
Bazaar is a monument to the energy of its founder. It is 
the largest specialty store in the middle west. Employ- 
ment is given to one hundred and sixty-five persons and 
the volume of business is constantly increasing. 

Mr. Herz is president of the Commercial Club, a director 
of the Rose Orjihan Home and is interested in all that adds 
to the welfare of the citv. 



WILLIAM RILEY M'KEEN 



FOR over half a century William Riley McKeen has 
taken an interest in everything pertaining to the 
welfare of Terre Haute. Although he is not as active 
now as a few years ago, much of his work and responsi- 
bilities having been shifted to younger shoulders, he is 
easily our foremost citizen. Mr. McKeen has endeared 
himself to Terre Hauteans because of his democratic man- 
ner, his enduring friendship and his rugged honesty. 

Mr. McKeen has evidently believed in the old adage 
about the rolling stone, for he was born and reared in this 
county. He has met with his greatest successes at home 
and Terre Haute, to him, is the dearest spot on earth. 
Mr. McKeen was born October 12, 1829. He was the 
eldest of a family of five children and early started to work, 
after receiving a common school education. At the age 
of seventeen he was a deputy clerk in the county clerk's 
office where he remained two years and then accepted a 
position as clerk in the State Bank of Indiana. He was 
promoted to the position of cashier. In 1855 he estab- 
lished "McKeen's Bank." Perhaps Mr. McKeen became 
best known when he was president of the \'andalia rail- 
road, a position which he filled with credit for twentv- 
nine years. Xo man ever connected with the \'andaHa 
enjoyed a greater popularity among the employes of the 
system than "Riley" McKeen. 

The McKeen bank celebrates its fiftieth year of existance 
by becoming a national bank this year, one of the latest 
of the private banks to come under government super- 
vision. While always giving much of his attention to 
banking, Mr. McKeen has been interested in numerous 
enterprises and is a holder of much real estate in Terre 
Haute and vicinity. He has been interested in the raising 
of fancy stock at Edgewood farm and enjoys nothing 
better than a social hour with his friends at the Fort Har- 
rison club. 

Mr. McKeen's ser\'ices to the republican partvare well 
known, though he has never held a public office. He has 
been a national delegate to republican conventions and 
was a member of the committee that notified President 
Roosevelt of his nomination. 





DAVID W. HENRY 



A FTER a ijinid many strenuous years in piilitics and 
■»*■ public life we have produced a picture of David 
W. Henry as a private citizen, enjoying his cigar 
and scanning a map of some coal and oil territory in the 
west. It is strange that the public hardly takes a man 
at his word when he says he is "out of politics" but we 
are boimd to believe Mr. Henry, for he is so busy these 
days that he has but little time for politics. Active all of 
his life, it is safe to say that the judge is busier now than 
ever. While the law has always been his first love, the 
man with legal experience can find a remunerative channel 
for his efforts along other lines now, and Mr. Henry is 
devoting the major part of his time to some ])retty big 
interests. 

In the year that Daniel Webster died — 1852 — Mr. 
Henry was born in the little town of Negley, Columbiana 
county, Ohio. He became a Hoosier when six years of 
age, his family locating near Jasonville. He started out 
very early to get his education and attended school at 
Farmersburg, and at Mt. I'nion, Ohio, college. Before 
he was eighteen years of age he was teaching school. His 
legal education was received at the Central Law School 
of Indianapolis. His teaching had well fitted him for the 
study of law and from the time that he located in Terre 
Haute he has been recognized as one of the leading mem- 
bers of the Ijar. He was associated with Davis & Davis 
for some time, and when H. D. Scott was appointed circuit 
court judge Mr. Henry succeeded to his business. Mr. 
Henry served two terms as prosecutor of Vigo county, 
was elected judge of the superior court in 1894 and was 
on the bench three years, resigning to accept the appoint- 
ment of coUecter of internal revenue for the district tmder 
President McKinley. 

Mr. Henry has served his party faithfully and even now 
cannot help taking a passing interest in iveiils reimlilican. 



JOHN R. PADDOCK 



■yiNG-LING LING! 
■*■ "Hello; yes, this is the postoffice. Is there a cyclone 
coming? We haven't heard of any." 

And at the other end of the hne there is an angry woman. 
This is one of the many funny queries answered by Assist- 
ant Postmaster Paddock in a single day. If you think 
it is a snap to be assistant postmaster ask him about it. 

While attending to the manifold duties of assistant 
postmaster, John R. Padock has found time to achieve 
some distinction as a chorus singer, end man, monologist 
and a singer of topical songs, and has even managed one 
of the most notable minstrel entertainments that the 
local lodge of Elks has ever presented. It is not given 
to many men to achieve fame at a single bound but this 
is what happened when Mr. Paddock sang that topical 
song, "Rip Van Winkle A\'as a I.ucky Man." at an amateur 
production given by the Elks, remembered as "Anchored." 
The Grand was packed to suffocation when the singer 
appeared in full evening dress and began the song. Scarcely 
had the first words died away when loud applause fol- 
lowed. Encore after encfjre was answered until forty 
verses of the song were sung The singer and the song 
will never be forgotten 

"tohn Ray" was born on North Seventh street on the 
first lot north of the Rose Dispensary. This was in 1868. 
He still lives on the same lot but not in the same house. 
For a time he was employed by the Havens & Geddes 
Company in the wholesale dry goods business For ten 
years he was in the McKeen bank. Then he was asso- 
ciated in the gents' furnishing business with James Hunter 
and retired from the mercantile business to become assist- 
ant postmaster under Postmaster Gray, in 1901, 






r<& 



'** r -SCHOOL 



OSCAR G. DERRY 



/^SCAR G. DERRY, the republican member of the 
^-^ school board, who was selected for that position in 
1904, believes that the poor boy and girl should be 
well equipped in every way for the battle of life and for 
this reason is an advocate of the manual training school. 
If he has a hobby, this is one and worthy of attention 
Mr. Derry will feel that he has accomplished something 
for his fellow man if he is responsible for a sentiment in 
favor of such a school that in time will crystaUize into a 
reality. 

Mr. Derry was born on a farm near Springfield, Illinois, 
in 1863, and worked on a farm until he was twenty years 
old. He received a common school education and then 
entered into the mercantile business with his father at 
Lovington, Illinois. After four years at Lovington he 
came to Terre Haute in 1886. through the influence of his 
present business partner, Mr. S. L. Fenner, and entered 
the employment of Tovvnley Brothers, hardware dealers. 
He was with the Townley company twelve years, ten of 
which were spent on the road as a traveling salesman. 
For one year he was a salesman for an Indianapolis hard- 
ware house and then became a member of the Fenner 
Hardware Company, being secretary of the corporation. 
Hardware and building supplies are sold l.)y the company 
and an extensive business is done. 

When Post O, of the T. P. A., was organized in Terre 
Haule ftiurtcen years ago, Mr. Derry was a charter mem- 
ber. He is a Mason and an Odd Fellow, and in politics 
has always been an ardent republican. As a lover of 
outdoor sports he enjoys seeing a baseball game better 
than any other athletic sport. As a boy he played base- 
ball and still shows the marks of a bad "muff" which 
dislocated a knuckle joint. 



HENRY C. STEEG 



No more worrying about the colored vote, no more 
losing of sleep over the Irish vote, the German vote 
or any other kind of a vote. Henry C. Steeg is now 
giving his time to business, and politics have been thrown 
into the waste basket. 

It is a safe bet that there isn't a better known man in 
Terre Haute today than ex-Mayor Steeg. His genialty 
has won him many friends and no matter what the cir- 
cumstances, he has always a smile for his friends. 

Besides the distinction of having served as the demo- 
cratic mayor of Terre Haute for two terms, Henry C. 
Steeg is known in Putnam county as the man who built 
the first stone road in that section. Limedale, Putnam 
county, is the liirthplace of Mr. Steeg, and the year of his 
advent was 1857. He worked on a farm and in a stone 
ciuarry owned by his father until he aspired to a higher 
education, and, upon finishing the graded schools, went 
to the Roanoke Lutheran College at Salem, Virginia. 
After two years at college he returned home and engaged 
in farming and also gave considerable attention to quarry- 
ing. In 1882 he became a contractor and it was then 
that he built Putnam's county's first stone road 

In 1885, Mr. Steeg established himself in the building 
supply business in Terre Haute. Ernest L. Reiman 
became his partner in 1887. In 1891 a company was 
incorporated with Mr. Steeg as secretary and treasurer, 
E. E. Reiman president and general manager, and E. L. 
Reiman vice-president. 

Mr. Steeg entered politics in 1888, becoming a council- 
man from the old Fifth ward. He was defeated for the 
same honors in 1896, and two years later, in 1898, ran for 
mayor on the democratic ticket, winning out by 691 
majority He was re-elected in 1902 by 1,047 majority, 
but was defeated by Edward Bidaman by a sufficient 
majority in 1904. Besides being interested in the building 
supply business, Mr. Steeg is vice-president of the People's 
Brewing Company, president and general manager of the 
Waveland Stone Company, and is interested in the Mer- 
chants Ice Company. He is a member of all of the 
Masonic bodies and belongs to a number of other lodges 
and organizations. 




^aajiiiin^i^t- 




CHARLES E. M'KEEN 



DELIEVING in the old adage that "cleanliness is next 
to Godliness" Charles E. McKeen has endeavored 
to do his duty. Washing has been reduced to a 
science by modern methods and for this the tired house- 
wives have to thank the laundrymen who liave made 
their paths much easier. If you do not believe that the 
laundry has "evoluted" along with other modern utilities, 
just visit the new Columbian laundry recently completed 
by Mr. McKeen. 

Just how McKeen happened to get into the laundry 
business is not known, but it is enough to say that he has 
made a success of it Born at Martinsville, Illinois, in 
1861, Mr. McKeen's parents brought him to Terre Haute 
before he had cultivated any great love for the boundless 
corn plains of the Sucker state. He is one of the many 
Suckers in Terre Haute. About the first work Mr. McKeen 
did when he finished his common school education was to 
twist brakes on the Vandalia between Terre Haute and 
Indianapolis and later between this city and Logansport. 
Then he went into the furnishing and clothing business 
for two years. After a Ijrief period at railroading again, 
Mr. McKeen established himself in the laundry business 
at Logansport and moved to Terre Haute from the "Bridge 
City" in 1895. His laundry was first located at Second 
and Main streets and then at Eleventh and Main streets. 
The business has steadily grown until a new building was 
required and the Columiiian laundry now occupies one of 
the largest and best buildings of its kind in the state. 

Mr. McKeen was honored with the presidency of the 
National Laundrymen' s Association in 1904. He is a 
Mason, an Elk and a member of the T. P. A. 



THATCHER A. PARKER 



THATCHER A. PARKER never would have entered 
politics had it not l^een for a friend uf his who was 
trying to get an office. The game proved interesting 
and the subject of this sketch still finds a great deal of 
pleasure in helping his friends, especially when they are 
seeking something from the republican jjie counter. 

As a member of the l^oard of public safety he has some- 
thing to do with the regulation of the police and fire 
departments. This position is not the most remunerative 
in the city but there is a good deal of responsibility, and 
some fun connected with the honor. Mr. Parker is pretty 
busy most of the time building bridges and other steel 
structures, yet he has time to attend to his office and 
politics, and once in a while to go hunting. He can tell 
you something about the fine points of a good dog and 
can almost tell you just how many republican and demo- 
cratic votes there are in eacli \vard. 

Mr. Parker was born on a farm near Hutsonville, 
Illinois, and came to Terre Haute with his parents when 
he was five years old. After a short time spent in the 
high school he went to Lansing, Michigan, where he at- 
tended the Michigan Agricultural College. Instead of 
becoming a scientific farmer lie turned out to be a good 
mechanical draftsman. After spending several years in 
some of the largest industrial establishments in the 
country, where he gained a fine knowledge of mechanical 
engineering he joined his father in the management of 
the Eagle Iron Works. In 1898 he went into the 
structural iron and steel business on his own account, 
making a specialty of bridge and building work. He 
became a member of the board of safety in 1904, being 
an appointee of Mayor Bidaman. He is a member of 
a dozen lodges, among them the Masons, the Elks and the 
Knights of Pythias. He is also a member of the American 
Mechanical Engineers Society and the National Associa- 
tion of Stationary Engineers. 



\f7NSTRUCTl0M5 

I'TOPOi-iCEMEr 





FRANK M. CLIFT 



TT is certain that a rush would be forthcoming if Uncle 
Sam were to have special bargain days and mark down 
revenue stamps for the sale of cigars, tobacco, Ii(|uiirs 
and wines. This is one business where no mark-down 
prices are necessary and no special inducements are held 
out to purchasers. 

Sixty-six men are employed in tlie Terre Haute internal 
revenue district and tlie collections amount to nearly 
twenty million dollars a year. Out of llic sixty-six dis- 
tricts in the United States the Terre Haute district stands 
second in the amount of collections. 

I'Vank M. Clift gives attention to the sale of stamps 
for special tax purposes — tobacco, snutT, cigars and beer. 
In a single day he has sold as high as •?! 80,000 worth of 
stamps for his employer. Uncle Sam, 

Mr. Clift was born in what he considers is the best town 
on earth, in 1867, and he has always been able to make 
the old place provide a good living for him. After com- 
pleting his studies in the public schools, he secured em- 
ployment in the Clift & Williams planing mill He knows 
something of carpentering, lias been a cabinet worker, 
and can keep books. In 1889 he was in charge of the 
money order department at the ])ostoflice and after four 
years in this position was engaged in the insurance busi- 
ness for some time. In 1899, Mr. Chft was appointed a 
deputy revenue collector and for the past three years 
has held the responsible position of cashier. 

He is a popular member of Company No. 3, Uniform 
Rank, Knights of Pythias, and serves as adjutant of the 
Sixth Indiana Regiment of the order. Besides, he is a 
member of the Masons and the Royal Arcanum. 



MORTON T. HIDDEN 



<<f N the Good Old Summer Time" is a popular song with 
Morton T. Hidden. The refrain lingers in his ears 
in the winter time and when the first 1]it of dust 
blows on Wabash avenue the sjirinkling wagons are at 
work making shekels for their owner wliilc the sim shines. 
It is in this manner that Morton T. Hidden keeps his 
lodge dues going for there is no more popular lodge man 
in the town. 

\'ery few people know" that Mr. Hidden taught the young 
idea how to shoot for one brief year, Ijut he did, and this 
was at a little red school house in Fayette township. Such 
genius was not to be wasted in a rural school room, al- 
though a year had been spent at the State Normal School 
in preparation for the profession of teaching. In 1883 
Mr. Hidden came to Terre Haute and engaged in the drug 
business and became the owner of the pharmacy at Sixth 
street and the Big Four railroad. He spent ten years 
as a druggist and then entered the real estate and insurance 
business, of which he has made a good success. He has 
had the street sprinkling contract in Terre Haute since 
1879. He began laying the dust with one wagon, but it 
requires six now and the dust laden territory increases 
every summer. At present he is treasurer of the Terre 
Haute Transfer Company, vice-president of the Viquesney 
Printing Company, treasurer of the Adjustable Building 
and Loan Company and president of the Hidden-Houk 
Company. Mr. Hidden belongs to the Elks lodge, the 
Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, and a half dozen 
other organizations. He is a member of the Uniform 
Rank of the Knights of Pythias, and is also a member of 
Canten McKeen. He cuts considerable figure as colonel 
of the Terre Haute regiment. He is major of the first 
Battalion of the Sixth Regiment, Knights of Pythias, and 
is a splendid tactician. 





FRANK H. MILLER 



A SSISTANT FIRE CHIEF MILLER thinks the snap 
•*»• shot is rather appropriate, though it seems to have 
been snapjjecl a little too early. Mr. Miller hastens 
to assure the public that the Terre Haute fire department 
does not fight fires in just this manner. Water is used as 
always, but the methods of getting the water on the burn- 
ing building are altogether different now. It has been a 
good many years since the bucket brigade fought fires in 
Terre Haute. The bucket brigade was succeeded by the 
old-fashioned hand engines and there are scores of Terre 
Hauteans who used to help ])ull these anticiuated machines 
to the scene of a fire which threatened houses in every 
direction. For effective fire fighting apparatus Terre 
Haute stands in the front rank and the department has 
the men who can use their ec|ui]nnenl intelligently and 
with good effect. 

Frank L. Miller was born in Alton, Illinois, in 1873. 
He accompanied his parents to Terre Haute in 1875 and 
has been here ever since. He was unalilc to attend the 
high school and so completed his education in the hard 
old school of experience. Fur a time he was employed as 
a clerk and then learned the trade of paper hanger. He 
followed this latter business until he was appointed to a 
place on the fire department in May, 1896, by Mayor 
Ross. 

He first served as a pipeman at the Four's and was then 
transferred to headquarters and became foreman of the 
Five's wagon. In June, 1903, he was sent back to the 
Four's as a captain. When Mayor Bidaman became chief 
executive of the city. Captain Miller became assistant 
chief, which position he holds at the present time. He 
responds to all alarms and pays particular attention to 
the book work and keeping of records in the chief's office. 
The greatest hobby of the assistant chief is the raising of 
chickens. He is an Odd Fellow and a Knight of Pythias. 



((■"pHAT new south-paw is a ]>eacli. 



Throws an expec- 
toration ball out of sight!" 
"Knock 'em out 'Mum!' Only one man down!" 

"All right, 'Rich,' a three bagger will do the work!" 

And after you hear rooting of this kind, if you will look 
directly back of the press box at Athletic Park, you may 
count on seeing Clifford L. Tyler, with his scorecard and 
pencil. Rain, snow or shine, the Hottentots always know 
they have at least one loyal rooter in tlie grand stand. 

It might not be to Mr. Tyler's credit to be know-n simply 
as a base ball fan. The story is told of a great English 
scholar who occasionally played billiards for recreation 
and upon one occasion met with an expert in this line of 
sport. The billiardist was an army officer who agreed to 
play with the scientist to pass the time. The game 
started off with officer making the first shot and he made 
all of his points before he stojiped. This disgusted the 
learned professor who placed his cue in the rack, mumbling 
something about the army otTiccr's education being sadly 
neglected. 

As a hotel clerk Mr. Tyler has an extensive acquaintance 
all over the country. He can greet a visitor with the 
greatest courtesy, answer the telephone, keep the bell boys 
on the hop and talk base ball at the same time. If this 
does not rec|uire ability, then no (iccii|i:ilion or profession 
does. 

At the time hostilities ceased between the north and 
south, Clifford Tyler came into existence in Terre Haute. 
He attended the graded schools and spent two years in 
the high school. Then he learned the trade of a boiler- 
maker, and was a good one, too. But fate ordained that 
he be something else. In 1884 Mr. Tyler left Terre Haute 
seeking a better town but failed to find one and returned 
twelve years later, after having a varied experience. He 
had clerked in hotels in Lincoln, Neljraska, Chicago, 
Omaha and Columbus. He accepted a position at the 
Filbeck Hotel, remaining there three and one-half years 
and then accepted the desk at the Terre Haute House. 
He returned to the Filbeck a short time ago. Some few 
people thought that Clifford would never get married 
but he did, his wife being formerly Miss Julia Woolsey. 





CLARENCE E. KIRK 



TF sailing had been more profitable, Clarence Edgar Kirk 
would probably have been a navigator of the briny 
deep. His love of the water comes from the fact that 
he was born in Toledo, Ohio, where there is plenty of it 
all the year round and where boys naturally take to water 
very early. As a member of the Toledo Yacht Club there 
was no more enthusiastic devotee of aquatic sport than 
Mr. Kirk. He misses the beautiful Maumee and the clear 
blue waters of Lake Erie very mucli, but his time has been 
well taken up since he came to Terre Haute as manager 
of llie New York Shoe Store, in seeing that tlie pulilic is 
supplied with the best of foot wearing apparel. 

Fitting out people with shoes that have style, hold their 
shape, tit lietter, wear longer and have a greater intrinsic 
value than the shoes of any other dealer, lias lieen the 
chief aim of Mr. Kirk. He drunnned tliis into the ears 
of the retailers on the road for several years before locating 
at Danville as the buyer for one of the biggest retail houses 
in Eastern Illinois. Wlicn a manager was wanted to 
rejuvenate a business that had suffered for lack of good 
management, Mr. Kirk was sent by his firm to Terre Haute. 
He is now secretary and treasurer of the company and 
has made a success in business, forming a large acquaint- 
ance that has liecn very valuable to him. He had not 
been in Terre HaiUe two years until lie was a victim of 
the Terre Haute girl, who has a wide reputation for her 
charms of womanly worth. Recently lie married Miss 
lone Floyd, a daughter of Mr. W. 11. h'loyd, architect. 
He is a member of the Young Business Men's Club and 
is interested in all that makes a city worth living in. 



CLAUDE G. BOWERS 



ORATORS as well as authors flourish on Indiana soil. 
Mr. Bowers is modest, but his ability as an orator 
has never been questioned since he made such a 
splendid fight for the democrats in tlie I'ifth congressional 
district in 1904 as their candidate for congress, running 
ahead of the national ticket four thousand votes. 

Claude G. Bowers was born in Indianapolis, in 1878. 
Circumstances that often prove the spur for many a boy 
made him quicklv appreciate the value of an education. 
He passed through the public schools and graduated from 
Shortridge high school. He studied law for a time but 
was tempted to enter the journalistic profession. For 
some time he was an editorial writer on an Indianapolis 
morning paper, and then he turned his eyes toward Terre 
Haute. Mr. Bowers did his first work here on the Gazette, 
later going to the Star. When the democrats wanted a 
man who would represent them well as a candidate for 
congress, Mr. Bowers was the choice. He stumped the 
district, making the most thorough canvass that his party 
had made in twenty years. Every nook and corner was 
searched out and the principles of true democracy ex- 
]K)unded by the young orator. From Se]Jtember 12th 
until the night of November 3d, Mr. Bowers certainly was 
busy. 

"Jap" Miller, who is mentioned by Riley in one of his 
poems, was the chairman of a meeting lield in Monrovia, 
Morgan county, during the campaign when Mr. Bowers 
visited there. Not a democrat had made a s])eech in the 
village for years. A street corner was good enough for 
the speaker, and surrounded by "Ja])" Miller and six 
other democrats Mr. Bowers made one of the best speeches 
of the campaign, no violence being offered. 

As an editorial writer, he is forceful and brilliant. As 
an orator he is logical and convincing, his extensive read- 
ing giving him the ability to express himself in the finest 
of literary form. 





D. ROSS BRONSON 



pATRONS of the Coliseum will easily recognize the 
■^ excellent likeness of Daniel Ross Bronson, whose 
business during the polo season at the Coliseum is 
to pick out the best seats in the house — those where no 
poles obstruct the view. Mr. Bronson does this very 
graciously and as a consequence everybody who wants a 
good seat is well pleased. He is also the person to whom 
everyone makes complimentary remarks about the polo 
or vaudeville teams, and he hears frequent suggestions 
about how to strengthen the polo quintet or secure a 
soubrette in whose voice there is no falsetto. 

Ross was born in Terre Haute in 1871. He had just 
completed two years in the high school when the structure 
burned, and then he journeyed to South Bend where he 
entered Notre Dame University, and took a literary 
course, spending four years in that famous institution. 
Then he went to the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor, 
a school that is famous for flooding the country with 
members of the legal profession. He is a graduate of the 
class of 1892. After Mr. Bronson had his sheepskin 
securely locked in his trunk he came back to Terre Haute 
and for a time engaged in the practice of law. Tlie 
princely fees obtained from the fining of law violators in 
police court were not satisfactory. Even some of the 
fines were remitted, and when David Watson was elected 
county clerk in 1894, Mr. Bronson became chief deputy. 
He filled this ])osili(m very well for three years and then 
resigned to go into tlic manufacturing business with his 
l^rother, Harry liniuson. A fire destroyed the factory 
and then the Bronson lirothers joined their father in the 
management of the Artesian bath house. Roller skating 
was introduced at the bath house and when polo Ijegan 
exciting the gas belt fans, Ross became associated with 
his brother in the building and management of the Col- 
iseum. 



H ADDON township, Sullivan county, Indiana, is the 
birthplace of Thomas M. Kehoe, whom everybody 
knows as the hay man and a great hehever in the 
princip es of the republican party. It was just one year 
after the civil war that Tom came into existence. He 
was born in a democratic community and enjoyed the 
distinction for many years of being one of the "measly" 
few republicans in Sullivan county. He worked on a 
farm for a little while, but the great throbbing, pulsating 
world of commerce beckoned, and Mr. Kehoe deserted the 
plow for the telegraph key. 

He was a telegraph operator and station agent on the 
Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad for fifteen years. 
Then he went into the hay business, establishing an office 
in Terre Haute. His operations extended over a great 
part of southern Indiana and eastern Illinois ; the business 
is wholesale, only. 

During the campaign of 1904 Mr. Kehoe rented the 
Clay City opera house for the purpose of storing some of 
his surplus hay in it, thus crowding out the wandering 
barnstormers. A councilman of Clay City had an ordi- 
nance passed making it a violation to store hay within 
certain limits. The hay man was not daunted. He 
secured the place and filled it from pit to dome. He won 
out on an injunction suit and the wrath of Clay City was 
showered upon him Congressman Charles B. Landis was 
to speak in Clay City. The Landis boys are popular 
everywhere. But as popular as Charley Landis was, he 
did not do the spellbinding act in Clay City. A friend of 
his telegraphed the following just before the date set for 
the speaking: 

" Don't come. Opera house filled with baled hay." 

And Clay City to this day remembers the big hay man 
from "Terry Hut" as responsible for the cancelling of the 
congressman's engagement. 

Mr. Kehoe's recent appointment as a member of the 
school board is a recognition of his ability and interest in 
the welfare of Terre Haute. 





JOSEPH G. ELDER 



MR. ELDER never dreamed that some day he would 
be a eal estate and insurance man, but he event- 
ually developed into a very good one after trying 
his hand at several other things. He learned the trade 
of cabinet making in his boyhood home, Centerville, 
Pennsylvania. After seven years had gone by and 
Joseph Elder had reached the age of discretion he came 
to Terre Haute in 1872. He never worked another day 
at his trade after reaching the l^anks of the Wabash, for 
there was no demand for the kind of substantial and hand- 
some cabinets, tabks and other furniture that he had 
been making in his eastern home. 

For eight years Mr. Elder was employed in the James 
Hooks planing mill which occu])ied the site of the present 
Hudnut Homing mills. When the Hooks mill burned to 
the ground in 1880 every tool owned by the then exjjert 
planing mill machinery man was destroyed Mr. Elder 
accepted an offer at this time from Mr. W. R. McKeen 
to manage an eight hundred acre farm for him in Kansas. 
Farming did not prove so very profitable for either man- 
ager or owner, and after two years in the Sunflower state 
the manager returned to Terre Haute Mr. Elder was 
offered the superintendency of the Terre Haute Street 
Car Company by Mr. McKeen, and tackled an entirely 
new line. He successfully held down this position for 
three years, giving it up when electricity su])planted 
horses as a motive power. 

After getting an excellent schooling for six years in 
the real estate and fire insurance offices of Mr. 1. H. C. 
Royse, and after spending two years as a partner in the 
same line of business with Mr. John Foulkes, Mr. Elder 
became secretary of the Wabash Building and Loan Com- 
pany. He is also secretary of the Citizens' Building and 
Loan Associaticm and is interested in numerous other 
enterprises. Mr. Elder is foremost in everything looking 
to the welfare of Terre Haute. If there is any hobby he 
would like to indulge in, it is traveling, but Terre Haute 
realty is so lively just at present that he has little time 
for this pleasure. 

Mr. Elder is a member of ' everal secret and fraternal 
orders and has been identified particularly with Company 
No. 3, Uniform Rank Knights of Pythias. 



JAMES M. VICKROY 



THERE is no goat so big or so vicious that it is feared 
by James M. Vickroy. He has ridden nearly a 
score of tliem into the mysteries of fraternal and 
secret orders of various kinds. 

Centerville, Pennsylvania, a quiet little village, 
nestled down in the beautiful Cumberland valley, mid- 
way between Bedford, Pennsylvania, and Cumberland, 
Maryland, is the birthplace of this well known lodge 
man. He worked on a farm until he was fifteen years 
of age and then secured a position carrying the mail 
between Bedford and Cumberland. This was a distance 
of thirty miles and the mail was carried quite regularly 
by the mail boy for two years — '62 and '63. fust a few 
times the Johnnies became active in the vicinitv of 
Harper's Ferry, and on several occasions they tore up 
the railroad tracks around Washington, throwing the 
schedule out of gear, but the mail was usually deposited 
each day where it belonged. 

Mr. Vickroy worked for four years as a clerk in a store 
at Cumberland, and here he made the acquaintance of 
Henry Gasaway Davis, who was connected with the 
firm. Mr. \'ickroy did all he could for his former 
friend in 1904, in his race for the vice-presidency of the 
United States, but his efforts w'ere of no avail. Taking 
Horace Greeley's advice, Mr. Vickroy came west, locat- 
ing in Harmony, Clay county, in 1869, where he fol- 
lowed the business of carpentering and contracting. In 
1875 he returned to his old home and was united in 
marriage with Miss Elizabeth Boore. In 1885 Mr. 
Vickroy came to Terre Haute and engaged in the selling 
of art supplies. He has made a splendid success of the 
business, and, in addition, has agents in all parts of the 
country selling his lodge charts, which have a wide reputa- 
tion 

In 1903 Mr. Vickroy was elected a councilman-at- 
large on the democratic ticket and served his constituency 
very well. 



A 



1.0. O. F 
I I. O. O.f. 




ii«^;^t^ 




GEO. A. SCHAAL, JR. 



X TEWSPAPERS, telephone companies, gas companies 
and policemen are accustomed to hearing kicks, but 
the transfer companies receive their share also. It 
is generally the traveling man who has the most kicks 
coming where the transfer man is concerned. Unless a 
trunk arrives from the railway station in five seconds 
the commercial traveler, especially the one from New 
York, gets busy on llie telephone immediately after he 
reaches his hotel. George A. Schaal, Jr., one of the 
members of the Terre Haute Transfer Company, does 
not drive a wagon but he is the man that hears the kicks 
and soothes the ruffled temper of the New Yorker. 

George A. Schaal was born in Terre Haute not so very 
long ago, Ijut he has had more business experience than 
some men twice his age. He did not wait to complete 
his education in the puljlic schools until he was doing 
something. However, he prepared for a l>usiness life by 
taking a commercial college course. For two years he 
had charge of the insurance department of the Stack & 
Durham Company and later joined M. T. Hidden in the 
insurance business, paying particular attention to the 
fire and casualty lines. Next he purchased an interest 
in the business with Mr. Hidden and two years ago became 
interested in the Terre Haute Transfer Company. 

Mr. Schaal is a Mason and an Elk. As an Elk he has 
taken a great interest in the amateur shows that have 
been presented by the lodge. "Anchored" given by the 
Elks was the first musical comedy ever attempted by 
amateurs in Terre Haute and Mr. Schaal's directing 
genius was brought into good use when it came to drill- 
ing the performers in their different parts. Tlie various 
entertainments given by the Elks afford him oppcjrtunity 
to exploit his histrionic aliility wliich is by no means 
inferior. 



LOUIS D. SMITH 



LOUIS D. SMITH "struck out" very early in life to 
make a living for himself, and no one will deny that 
he has done well. He has also "struck out" in the 
great American game, for he played ball on the cross lots 
of the town several years ago, being a member of the Old 
Moonlight team. Louie admits that he was about the 
best third baseman that the team ever had. Louie 
Smith's interest in base ball has never waned and to this 
day he is one of the most ardent fans. When the team 
is away Louie ahvays has his eye on the newspaper bul- 
letin boards and generally waits until the last man is out 
in the ninth inning before he is satisfied. 

Baseball in Terre Haute without Louis Smitli being 
interested in it, would be a good deal like seeing Hamlet 
without the principal character appearing. Ever since 
the cross lots days he has been interested in the game and 
was one of the stockholders in the Terre Haute club that 
played in the old Northwestern league when the mileage 
for each team amounted to about 10,000 miles each season. 
Mr. Smith was one af the promoters of the Three-I league 
and at present is president of the local association which 
owns a franchise in the Central league. The Hottentots 
won the pennant in the Three-I league the first season and 
last year finished second in the Central league race. 

Mr. Smith is a native of Terre Haute and was thrown 
upon his own resources at an early age. As a boy he sold 
newspapers on the street and carried a route for the old 
Express. At fifteen years of age he was associated in 
business with M. G. Walsh and a year later was sole pro- 
prietor, handling newspapers and periodicals of all kinds. 
The business grew, and later its owner moved to his present 
location. Mr. Smith has the most complete news stand 
in Western Indiana, and in addition to handling periodi- 
cals of all kinds, carries a large stock of books and sporting 
goods. Next to a baseball game, Mr. Smith enjoys an 
automobile ride best. He recently purchased a machine 
and joined the ranks of the autoists. 







]^m9»^^, 





CHARLES H. EHRMANN 



CHARLES H. EHRMANN does not cut steaks and 
hams at present. One good reason why he does 
not is that he does not have to. This ought to be 
sufficient. However, he still gives a great deal of atten- 
tion to the beef and pork packing business, as he does to 
the coal business, banking and numerous other enterprises. 
He is one of the busiest men of the town and deserves the 
success that he has earned. 

Speaking of the subject of hams, bacons and lard: Mr. 
Ehrmann really has a hobby and that one is the turning 
out of delicious smoked meats, first-class bacons and pure 
lard with which to fry other good eatables. The Red, 
Blue and White Ribbon brands are pretty well known, 
not only in Terre Haute but in other cities within a radius 
of seventv-five miles. A number of by-products are made 
bv Mr. Ehrmann. In other words all Viut tlie "squeal" 
is made into something of conmiercial value. 

Mr. Ehrmann is a Terre Hautean by birth. After com- 
pleting a course in the public schools he became interested 
in the meat business, and from a small retail shop his 
interests have grown, making his establishment one of the 
largest and best known in this part of the state. For a 
number of years Mr. Ehrmann has been connected with 
the Ehrmann Coal Company, and is its president. Three 
mines are owned and operated. Yards and retail offices 
are located in Chicago and an extensive business is done 
in Terre Haute. Mr. Ehrmann is president of the West 
Terre Haute bank, president of the Central building and 
Loan Association, and has many other interests that 
demand his attention. 

While a very busy man he has always found time for 
other activities, and is superintendent of the First M. E. 
Sunday School. Mr. Ehrmann is wide awake in matters 
of religious moment and has always contributed liberally 
to worthy projects. His greatest fad is the camera, and 
on recent trips to various parts of the United States he 
has secured a fine collection of pictures. 



ELIAS F. LEONARD 



THE inseparable companion of Fire Chief Leonard is 
his trusty horse, "Pig." Wlien an alarm is turned 
in, "Pig" is just as anxious to reach the scene of the 
blaze as the chief is, and does his best to lead the com- 
panies, the gong on the front end of the conveyance warn- 
ing pedestrians and teams of the coming of the fire fighters. 
If "Pig" could talk he would probably say that he is a 
better looking animal than he is shown to be, which he is. 
by a good deal. 

Ehas F. Leonard has spent over a score of years in the 
fire department, and like most firemen he has passed 
through a number of harrowing experiences, wearing scars 
as mementos of hard falls and knocks received in fighting 
flames. He was born in Terre Haute April 3, 1857, and 
passed through the graded schools. Not having been 
born with a golden spoon in his mouth he began work 
very early and his first position was secured in the old 
Oilman Heading factory on north Third street. After 
four years at this kind of employment, Mr. Leonard en- 
gaged in the bridge building trade and followed it for 
seven years. He was first appointed to the force in 1882 
and was stationed as a pipeman at No. 1 house, corner of 
Third and Lafayette avenues. The same year he became 
a captain and during his career on the force has been 
transferred to several different houses. 

It was while he was captain at headquarters that he 
received his present appointment, that nf chief, Mayor 
Bidaman promoting him to that position when he entered 
office in September 1904. 

The most serious accident which befell Chief Leonard 
was at the Sage fire in 1887. He was struck by a falling 
ladder and fell a distance of twelve feet. He still bears 
the scars of that fall. As chief of the department he fills 
the bill very well, his long experience especially fitting 
him for this responsible position. 



1143153 





EWALD E. REIMAN 



ly yiR. REIMAN'S easy attitude in this carieature is not 
one indicating activity, and just to avoid conveying 
an impression that Mr. Reinian is not industrious, 
we will explain that he is watching the other fellow do the 
work. There is simicthing peculiarly fascinating about 
watching otlier men at work, and this may be noted at 
almost any time where a number of men are digging an 
excavation and numerous pedestrians are passing. You 
might term this little rest that Mr. Reiman is taking a 
' ' sewer pipe cinch . ' ' 

Speaking of sewer pipes, the Reiman & Steeg Company 
handles them and many other supplies of a building and 
structural kind. Ewald Reiman is a Terre Haute product. 
He attended the ]nil)lic schools and started to work very 
early. His father, U. L. Reiman, was one of Terre Haute's 
best known German-American citizens, and established 
himself in tlie building supply business in 1856. The son 
upon leaving school entered his father's employ, receiving 
the preliminary training that has titled him for his present 
position as a member of the Reiman & Steeg Company. 
The company was incorporated in 1891, and upon the 
death of his father Mr. Reiman became president and 
general manager, with Henry C. Steeg secretary and 
treasurer, and Ernest L. Reiman, Jr., vice-president. 

An extensive wholesale and retail business is' done in 
the selling of building supplies and some very large con- 
tracts have been carried out by the company. Mr. 
Reiman is one of the best known young business men of 
the town and is deservedly popular. When the Elks 
lodge. No. 86, was organized, Mr. Reiman was a charter 
member. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and belongs to the 
Young Business Men's Club. 



LOUIS C. BUTLER 



HERE we see Mr. Butler on his wheel going at a speed 
which indicates that he has discovered something. 
He has made a lightning calculation and finds that 
So-and-So, who owns a large factory in Terre Haute, has 
just made an alteration in his plant which increases the 
danger of loss by fire. Well, what does Mr. Butler do 
about it?' He inuuediately notifies the various insurance 
companies and up goes Mr. So-and-So's rate. Mr. Butler 
is paid to do this sort of thing. He is the inspector and 
manager of the fire insurance bureau in Terre Haute, and 
it keeps him busy looking after the changing of risks on 
property known as "extra hazardous." 

Mr. Butler was born in 1840, on a farm at the edge of 
the city of Columbus, Ohio. He had no more than ob- 
tained a fair start in an educational way until he enlisted 
in the army, becoming a member of the first Ohio cavalry. 
He served three years, a portion of that time being on 
detached duty, employed in various responsible clerk- 
ships. After the war he taught school for nearly two 
years and then went straight into the fire insurance busi- 
ness, identifying himself with the Home Fire Insurance 
Company, of Columbus. He was next an adjuster and 
special agent for the American of New York and had 
charge of six states for a number of years. He came to 
the Hoosier state in 1884, locating at Indianapolis, and 
held various responsible positions with several of the best 
known companies in the country. For the past twenty 
years he had visited Terre Haute on an average of once a 
month, and was so favorably impressed with the town 
that when he was offered his present position he accepted 
it. Mr. Butler has introduced the new rating system and 
has been as busy as a bee ever since he struck the town. 
Over $300,000 worth of business is done each year in the 
fire insurance line here, and all of the policies are scanned 
by the watchful eye of the inspector. Even after thirty- 
two years of hard work Mr. Butler is still a voung man 
and enjoys excellent health. 





CHARLES B. JAMISON 



/^HARLES B. JAMISON— no one knows what the "B" 
^— ' stands for — is a native of Tippecanoe county, of 
which Lafayette is the capital. He is an exceedingly 
versatile and useful fellow citizen, W'c could hardly do 
without him, especially as secretary of the Young Men's 
Christian Association. Again, he is one of the best known 
and fairest referees of athletic games in the state. If he 
delights in anything, it is in seeing the young men of the 
country broad shouldered and deep chested. He takes 
even a greater interest in seeing that they are honorable 
and manly in the broadest christian sense. 

Mr. Jamison, or "Jamie" if you please, was always 
interested in the young men and boys. He was graduated 
from the Lafayette high school and spent several years at 
Purdue University. After leaving college he studied law 
for a while but gradually drifted into business and for 
several years was in the general merchandising business 
in Lafayette with his brothers. When the Young Men's 
Christian Association was organized in Lafayette he was 
chosen secretary of the execuitve board and immediately 
took a deep interest in association work. 

He came to Terre Haute in 1892 as a representative of 
the state Young Men's Christain Association committee, 
and assisted in organizing the local association. He be- 
came its secretary and has stuck with the job. He has 
seen the association grow until it is one of the largest and 
best in the state. He especially fitted himself for the place 
by taking a course in the training school at Chicago and is 
today one of the hardest working secretaries in the country. 
He has been elected secretary here for thirteen years. With 
a membership of six hundred men and property valued at 
$60,000, the local association ranks very high. Mr. 
Jamison had much to do with rearing this structure, and 
the thirteen years of his life here have not been spent in 
vain. 



WILLIAM H. DUNCAN 



r'OR the past six years William H. Duncan has been 
* giving his undivided attention to the work of secre- 
tary of the Commercial Club, a position which re- 
quires a pecuhar fitness. An all-round experience has 
made Mr. Duncan just the man for the place. He has 
helped land a number of good industries and has empha- 
sized the importance of Terre Haute to the industrial 
world in no uncertain tone. In the past six years through 
the efforts of the club Terre Haute has added to her indus- 
trial field new factories representing a capital of 52,000,000 
and employing 5,000 skilled workers. The result of this 
splendid work is reflected in the rapid growth of the city. 
Mr. Duncan is an Irishman and was born in the famous 
old city of Dublin, in 1848. He attended a private school 
in Dublin until he was fifteen and then came to Terre 
Haute, where his father had preceded him and was en- 
gaged in the pork packing business, an industry that 
flourished greatly in the early days of the town. After 
arriving here, Mr. Duncan made a study of the business 
and in order to add a little more to his education, attended 
the University of ilichigan. On account of poor health 
he returned to Dublin in 1869 but did not remain there 
long, coming back to Terre Haute and later locating in 
Sacremento, California, where he was secretary of the state 
board of agriculture. Mr. Duncan has been a successful 
newspaper man. He was with the old Express in its 
editorial department and for three years was the manager 
of the Saturday Evening Mail. From 1886 to 1889 he 
was manager of a daily newspaper at Garden City, Kansas, 
being in the Sunflower state at a time when it was booming 
and undergoing a great many exciting experiences. For 
over two years he held a responsible position under the 
government at the Xavajo Indian agency, at Fort De- 
fiance, Arizona. He has been secretary of both the fair 
and trotting associations and has done his share to pro- 
mote Terre Haute as a wide awake town and one good to 
live in. Mr. Duncan became secretary of the Commercial 
Club in 1889. 





EDWIN B. M'ALLISTER 



'T~'HE moljilily of Dr. Edwin B. McAllister is the wonder 
•*■ of his fellow physicians as well as that of his friends 
and acquaintances. He doesn't use an automobile 
to get around in, but he "gets there just the same." Night 
and day you are almost sure to come in contact with the 
doctor hustling to relieve suffering humanity 

Dr. McAllister was born in the pretty little town of 
Bowhng Green, Clay county, Indiana, in 1868. In those 
days. Bowling Green was more lively than it is now. Once 
it was the county seat, and, instead of Brazil being the 
metropolis. Bowling Green was the center for official 
business. Dr. McAllister has spent many a day along the 
banks of Eel river, fishing, and thinks a great deal of the 
old home place vet. He came to Terre Haute in 1887 and 
entered school. He took the full course in the high school, 
graduating in the class of 1889. Then he worked for a 
time in a commission house, earning and saving money for 
his subsequent start at the Rush Medical College, Chicago. 
Wliile attending Rush he waited tables and in other ways 
contrived to do just as well as some of the students who 
heard from father every week. He graduated in 1894 
and began the practice of his profession in the Windy City. 
He became ill witli apjiendicitis tliough, after he was 
fairly settled down in Cliicago, and came home to thor- 
oughly rest up and be cured of his ailment. To ajjpen- 
dicitis Terre Haute is indebted for a good iihysician. He 
decided to remain here after he recovered. 

He has been a member of the physicians' staff at St. 
Anthony's hospital for eight years, and does a great deal 
of examination work for several insurance companies. Dr. 
McAllister was married in 188') to Miss Grace Isbell, of 
Kendallvillc, Indiana. He is a member of several well 
known fraternal orders. 



HENRY NEUKOM 



THE name of Neukom appeared in the first directory 
of Terre Haute, and there are several more Neukoms 
now than there were when the first census takers 
started on their rounds to find out who hved within the 
city boundaries. Henry Neukom is for Terre Haute first, 
last, and all the time, but pulls just a little liit harder for 
the east end than he does for any other particular section. 
This is because he has a well stocked dry goods store on 
East Wabash avenue and likes to see the east end mer- 
chants get their share of prosperity. 

However, Mr. Neukom says he is not seriously consider- 
ing the introduction of such an ordinance as he holds in 
his hands. As tlic republican member of the council from 
the Fourth ward, he realizes that councilmanic legislation 
is of a different kind from that of restricting business to 
any particular locality. Mr. Neukom was never in pohtics 
until 1904, and then he was successful in landing what he 
started out to obtain, and that was a seat in the city 
council chamber. He Ijelieves in municipal ownership 
and is with the mayor on the matter fif the city having an 
electric lighting plant of its own. 

Mr. Neukom was born in Terre Haute in 1860, and upon 
completing a course in the graded schools he began 
husthng. His first position was in the office of Fred A. 
Ross, where he learned something about the insurance 
and real estate business. In 1876 he entered the employ 
of the Havens & Geddes Company and was a salesman 
and buyer for this well known dry goods firm for some 
time. After acquiring an excellent knowledge of the busi- 
ness he branched out for himself and established a store 
at his present location, No. 1119 East Wabash avenue. 
He has been successfid and has a splendid trade. 

Two of the oldest families of the city were united when 
Mr. Neukom was wedded in 1882 to Miss Louise Nehf. 
He is a member of the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, 
the American Woodmen and the National Union lodges. 




I An 

TO M/\V<t 
EAS.T 

WAe,<\5H _ 

/"iVENOE /^ 

BOiJNCSS 
-^l^HE C,Ty 





HERMAN HULMAN, JR. 



T TKRK: we see Herman Huhuan, Jr., finishing his record 
breaking run from Chicago to Terre Haute. Up to 
the presest time the record made liy Mr. Huhnan 
has not been equalled and naturally he is ])roud of the 
feat, which was accomplished under conditions tliat were 
not the best. The distance from tlie Windy City to Terre 
Haute is two hundred and forty-two miles, and it took 
just fourteen hours for Mr, Hulman to get up and down 
the hills, splash through the mud and water, and finally 
stop his sixty-horse-power four cylinder Peerless in front 
of the Terre Haute house and receive the congratulations 
of his friends. The machine was coated with Illinois and 
Indiana nuul from front to rear in a solid mass. 

Mr. Hulman has taken an interest in athletics ever since 
the days of the old fashioned high wheel, and he still holds 
the record on one of these machines, having circled the 
Ijains mile track in 2:53, He was one of the first owners 
of an auto, and in addition to setting a record for tlie 
Chicago trip, has made the ride from here to CHnton in a 
twenty horse-power machine, a distance of 13.8 miles, in 
twenty-five minutes. Mr. Hulman is a native of Terre 
Haute and received his education in the common schools 
and at the Rose Polytechnic. After leaving the latter 
school he engaged in the wholesale liquor business for ten 
years, merging the business into that of the Hulman 
Grocery Company. The Hulman Grocery is one of the 
largest and most ccmiplete west of Pittsburg, the members 
(.if the firm being Herman Hulman, Sr., Herman Hulman, 
Jr., and Anton Hulman. 

Mr. Hulman is a member of tlic Cliicago Automoliile 
Club and the Chicago Athletic Club, and is an lilk. 



JAMES A. COOPER, JR. 



SOME men were born great and a few others were born 
in Posey county. Prosecuting Attorney James A. 
Cooper, Jr., belongs to the latter class. All of the 
greatness he has acf[uired has been through hard work 
and study. From the place where the Rappite com- 
munity flourished and where Robert Owen tried his experi- 
ment — New Harmony, Indiana — came Mr. Cooper. He 
was bom in the quaint little town in 1874. 

The future lawyer came to Terre Haute with his parents 
when he was ten years of age. He attended the public 
schools, leaving the high school in his junior year to enter 
De Pauw University, from which institution he was grad- 
uated in 1895. Realizing that about the best experience 
for a young man is the newspaper business, Mr. Cooper 
spent a year on the Chicago dailies, where he hustled 
after the "elusive item" and regaled the public with the 
happenings of the day. Having the legal profession in 
view, Mr. Cooper went to Harvard, where he received a 
degree in both the literary and law departments. In 1900 
the Harvard graduate returned to the banks of the Wabash 
hung out his shingle and cooled his heels for some time 
before the clients began coming in very fast. \A'hen the 
campaign opened in 1904 he entered the race for the 
nomination to the office of prosecuting attorney. The 
candidate quietly and effectively campaigned for eight 
months, saying but httle and sawing wood. He received 
the nomination hands down and when election day came 
received a majority of 2,740 votes over his opponent. 
Mr. Roosevelt himself received only four hundred votes 
more than did Mr. Cooper, who acknowledges that Roose- 
velt helped the success of the republican ticket very 
materially. Since he has been in the prosecutor's office, 
Mr. Cooper has made a very creditable showing, disposing 
of five murder cases and showing an activity that does 
not bid well for Vigo criminals. Mr. Cooper is a member 
of the Knights of Pythias and the Young Business Men's 
club. 





WILLIAM E. NICHOLS 



■ I 'HE word coroner probably comes from the French. 
coHitc, meaning tn run. In the lirst place, if you 
want to lie coroner it is necessary to run for the 
office, and after you have .got it, it is re(|uired that you 
keep yourself jjrepared to run immediately on the first 
call for your services. This picture shows Dr. Nichols on 
the run. He's the coroner. 

The coroner is the man who gets there after it is all 
over and starts a guessing contest as to how it happened. 
Dr. Nichols has been thus occu])ied ever since he landed 
in the office in the fall of 1904. He was born in tlie "show 
me" state, namely, Missouri, at tlic little town of Neosha, 
in Uctober, 1871. He left there with his parents at the 
tender age of one year to come to Terre Haute. Gradual 
ing from the hi.gli school in 1889 the future physician and 
coroner lost no time in getting to Chicago where he enteretl 
the Rush Medical college. In 1894, Dr. Nichols graduated 
and located at Edgar Station, Illinois, where he gave his 
first prescription. For five years the doctor practiced 
in the Sucker state and then moved to Ellsworth where 
he remained until 1902, Then he moved into the city. 
Just to better acquaint himself with the people and get 
an experience that was worth having, he ran for coroner 
on the republican ticket in the memorable republican 
year of 1904. He received a majority of 1,640 votes, 
which showed that he had hustled pretty hard. 

The doctor is a member of the Vigi) Medical Society, 
the Indiana State Medical Society, the Aesculapian Society 
and the American Medical Association. He is a Knight 
of Pythias and a hustler in his profession as well as in the 
office of coroner. 



HARRY M. SPANG 



|V yiR. SPAN'G is a real estate man who finds time also 
■'■''■'■ to do some business on the side in the way of loans 
and insurance. The picture shows him holding up 
the plans for a new ten-story business block that is badly 
needed in Terre Haute. Mr. Spang believes Terre Haute 
could easily utiUze such a structure and his aims in this 
direction will probalily be realized, for he has a way of 
doing things when he starts out with that intention. 

Like a great many men whose "phizes" are to be seen 
in this l)ook, Mr. Spang was born on a farm. At the foot 
of the Allegheny mountains, in the village of Roaring 
Springs, Pennsylvania, Mr. Spang was born in 1859. Until 
twenty years of age he remained in his native jjlace going 
to school in the winter and, in the summer, following the 
plow. Then he went to the Normal school at Bedford, 
expecting to prepare himself for the study of law. How- 
ever, events shaped themselves so that a mighty good 
real estate man was made instead. After being employed 
as a clothing salesman in a store at Altoona for two years, 
Mr. Spang went to Johnstown where he was with the 
Cambria Steel Company, later journeying to Chicago, 
where he held several responsiljle positions before coming 
to Terre Haute in 1890. He was with the \'igo Real 
Estate Company two years, and since that time has been 
in business for himself. 

Mr. Spang has built hundreds of homes in Terre Haute 
and he has sold scads and scads of lots, upon which later 
sprang up homes that have helped to make the city what 
it is. Mr. Spang is one of the best posted men in the city 
on values and has been interested in many important 
deals in dirt. He is a republican and has dallied in the 
great game of politics. In the recent city campaign he 
was a cadidate for councilman-at-large. Mr. Spang is a 
thirty-second degree Mason, a Shriner, a Knight of Pythias 
and a member of the Royal Arcanum. 



It' 

IBB 





GEORGE W. HOFFMAN 



A S you will notice, Mr. Hoffman is in close touch with 
•**■ the telephone. When the instrument is not 
occupying his attention he is looking over a pile 
of blue prints, a pay roll or a requisition for a lot of mate- 
rial with which to construct a railroad, either in Oklahoma, 
Illinois or Indiana. Some husky Irish foreman fifty miles 
away is likely to call up Mr. Hoffman at any moment and 
inform him that a bunch of dynamite has just exploded 
killing "six dagoes," and then we see the secretary of the 
Kinser Construction Company getting ready to move to 
the scene of disaster. 

The life of the contractor is filled with trials and tribula- 
tion, especially when a firm does as big a business in a 
year as the Kinser Company. Hundreds of men and 
teams are employed, thousands of dollars paid out for 
material, and the pay roll reaches figures that are big 
enough to stagger the ordinary individual. It rains and 
the men are idle, material is not being shipped fast enough, 
a strike is on, the weather is too cold or else it is too hot, 
and then you can begin to get some idea of what the 
secretary has to look after. He is the clearing house for 
a big bunch of kicks, but with all of these troubles no one 
will deny that Mr. Hoft'man is a very affable fellow. 

He was born in Terre Haute in 1872, attended the 
graded schools, high school and business college and at 
the age of seventeen was working as an assistant in the 
office of the Bradstreet Company. At one time in Mr. 
Hoffman's life he started in to learn the jewelry business 
but after putting two or three clocks out of business he 
gave it up. He has a dread of wheels. For a time Mr. 
Hofi'man was in the fire insurance business, held a respon- 
sible position with a well-known New York firm of recti- 
fiers, and then accepted a place with the Kinser Company. 
He has been in charge of imjjortant construction work for 
the firm in Oklahoma and Indian Territory, and is now 
located in the Terre Haute office. Mr. Hoffman is an Elk 
and a member of the Knights of Columbus. 



HORACE E. TUNE 



J TORACE E. TUNE, of the firm of Tune Brothers, 
■^ ^ clothiers, is having his first experience in the capac- 
ity of a city official. He is one of the republican 
members of the board of public safety. The remunera- 
tion attached to the office is not so very great, yet the 
time required for official duties is considerable. This is 
the board that makes policemen and firemen and issues 
orders for the government of these departments. The 
especial fitness of each apphcant who aspires to fight 
flames or carry a baton must be closely looked into when 
an appointment is made. The same board does the 
catechizing when an em])loyL- of the city falls by the 
wayside. 

Mr. Tune is a Tennessean by birth, his home town being 
Shelbyville. He was reared on a farm and was graduated 
from the public schools. He spent some time at the 
University of Tennessee and afterward engaged in the 
clothing business with his brother, John M. Tune, at 
Plainfield, Missouri. Howard Mater and John M. Tune 
were once employed as clerks in the same chothing store 
at Wichita, Kansas, and it was during a visit here with 
Mr. Mater that Mr. Tune became impressed with Terre 
Haute. The Tune Brothers decided to leave Plainfield, 
where they had been for eight years, and came to Terre 
Haute in 1896, establishing a clothing store at 515 and 
517 Wabash avenue. The present quarters in the Erwin 
block were occupied in the fall of 1899. Mr. Tune is sec- 
retary and treasurer of the company and general man- 
ager, while his brother, John M. Tune is vice-president. 
Mr. Tune is a Mason of high standing, being a member 
of Terre Haute Council No. 8, Chapter 1 1 , Commandery 
No. 16, Ararat Temple, Kansas City, and Terre Haute 
Lodge No. 19. He is also an Elk, being a member of 
Lodge No. 86. 




/ /^ fj •-j^''-<f.j/ 




GEORGE G. MORRIS 



A FEW remarks aljout the Penn are particularly appro- 
priate coming from Mr. Morris, for he is very much 
interested in the subject. What he refers to is not 
the pen which is said to be mightier than the sword, but 
the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company, of Philadelphia. 
Mr. Morris makes it a duty to see that his friends are thor- 
oughly protected in case of death but not against death. 
Just at present Mr. Morris is emphasizing the mutuality 
of the Penn, which is a mighty big point in its favor. 

Waveland, Indiana, was the birthplace of Mr. Morris, 
but his father being a Christian church clergyman he 
picked up his early schooling in several different places. 
When it came to securing an education, Mr. Morris selected 
De Pauw University. However, he left that institution 
in his junior year. His first position was in an insurance 
office, the Penn Mutual, at Indianapolis, where he re- 
mained for six months, later being transferred to \'in- 
cennes. He was sent to Terre Haute in 1900 and has 
control of fourteen counties for his company in the central 
western portion of Indiana. The fact that the Penn is 
an absolutely mutual company, maintaining this great 
feature in numerous ways, has made a Penn Mutual policy 
very desirable to insurers. Its rapid growth may be as- 
cribed in a measure to the many different forms of policy 
written by the company, enabling its representatives to 
meet all kinds of honorable competition. The magnificent 
divident-paying record of the Penn is something to be 
considered and all holders of policies are treated in an 
equitable and just manner. No risks are classified and 
and the policy contract is very liberal. A glance at a 
few figures, the result of an examination ordered by the 
company in 1904, speaks louder than mere words. In 
December 31, 1904, the company had 140,798 poHcies out- 
standing insuring $332,016,287. The total admitted as- 
sets were 568,243,602.11, of wliicli the net reserve 
amounted to S56,739,4,t7.0(I, anil Ihc surplus S4,231,- 
261.22. 



JOSEPH S. MADISON 



JOSEPH S. MADISON had no intention of being a drug- 
gist when he left Wyoming Seminary, at Kingston, 
Pennsylvania, one spring several years ago and began 
looking for something to do during the vacation. It just 
happened that he found employment in a drug store first. 
This was at Hyde Park, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Scran- 
ton. He worked in this store two years and then went to 
Philadelphia, where he entered the Philadelphia College 
of Pharmacy. He graduated from this institution, but 
did not procure his diploma until a year later because he 
was under twenty-one years of age. 

Mr. Madison is the son of a Methodist clergyman and 
was born at Bethany, Pennsylvania, in the Blue Ridge 
mountains. His boyhood days were spent in the Wyom- 
ing Valley, and owing to his father holding several charges 
he received his education at different schools in the valley, 
and at Wyoming Seminary. It was in 1880 that he 
received the cherished sheepskin, and for two years was 
employed in a Philadelphia pharmacy. Through a 
brother who was a traveling salesman, he was induced 
to come to Terre Haute in 1881. His first position here 
was in the manufacturing laboratory of Gulick & Berry, 
wholesale druggists, and he remained with them until 
they went out of the wholesale business. 

Mr. Madison first engaged in business for himself at 
Third and Park streets. In 1892 he located down town, 
buying his present store of George Buntin. Mr. Shuman 
was a partner for one year, selling out his interest to Mr. 
Madison. The business at Seventh street and Wabash 
avenue has increased a great deal since 1892 and occupies 
Mr. Madison's entire attention, excepting when he gets 
away for a brief rest of a week or two out of the year. 
Invariably when these little vacation periods come along 
Mr. Madison hies away to Lake Maxinkuckee, where he 
angles for bass. He is a member of the State Pharma- 
ceutical Association. 





GEORGE W. KRIETENSTEIN 



A CC(^RDING to the state law oil must be tested, and 
■'*■ when it was necessary to appoint a good man for 
the place, Governor Durbin selected George W. 
Krietenstein. Here we see Mr. Krietenstein making a 
test of some of the product which is hn)ught out of the 
earth by Mr. Rockefeller, and sold almost exclusively by 
him to the American public. If the oil turns out to be 
bad, Mr. Rockefeller suffers a loss of tainted money. 
According to the deputy oil inspector, the man with the 
bald head and indigestion is in no immediate danger of 
becoming poor through any quantity of oil being con- 
demned in Indiana. 

Terre Haute is the birthplace of the oil inspector, and 
he arrived on the scene just as the great American people 
were celebrating the anniversary of their independence, 
July 4, 1871. The noise of cannon fire crackers did not 
frighten George and he decided to remain here. He 
secured his early training in the public schools, and while 
yet a young man began hustling. He went into the drug 
and glass business with his father, Carl Krietenstein. The 
firm is one of the oldest and best known in the city. The 
subject of this story is one of the hardest working repub- 
licans in the state and has contributed no little energy 
looking to the success of his party. He was district 
manager of the Lincoln League in 1900 and was also a 
member of its executive committee. He is an ex-president 
of the Thompson club and widely known among the Sons 
of Veterans, having been state commander in 1901 and 
1902, and for three years previous the treasurer of the 
state Sons of Veterans department. 

In 1901 Governor Durbin appointed Mr. Krietenstein 
custodian of the state house, a responsible position, which 
he filled with credit until he resigned in April, 1903, to 
give his attention to private business. He was appointed 
deputy oil inspector by Governor Durbin in 1903, and 
was reappointed to the position by Governor Hanly when 
he went into office. 



HOMER L. WILLIAMS 



f TERE we see the energetic manager of the Atlantic 
*■ ^ and Pacific Tea and Coffee Company, Homer L. 
Wilhams. 

We, in these days do not appreciate the great privilege 
we have of obtaining all the splendid kinds of teas and 
coffees at a few cents per pound. Just think! In the 
middle of the seventeenth century the queen of England 
was almost tickled to death on being presented with two 
pounds of tea by the East India Company. She certainly 
ought to have been delighted, as tea sold for only fifty 
dollars a pound in those days. Mr. Williaius sells it for 
a whole lot less now. 

Brookhaven, Mississippi, is the native town of Mr. 
WilUams. He received his education at Brookhaven and 
Summitt and later moved to Crowley, Louisiana, where 
his father engaged in the growing of rice. Not liking the 
rice business so well, the son went to Macon, Georgia, 
where he attended a business college. Meeting a Terre 
Hautean at Macon, and hearing something about the 
opportunities for a real live hustler, Mr. Wilhams decided 
to come north. He arrived in Terre Haute a few years 
ago and accepted a position with the Atlantic and Pacific 
Company. He returned to the south and tried rice grow- 
ing for one season but owing to extremely dry weather 
he concluded to give tea selling another trial and returned 
to the banks of the Wabash. Mr. Williams became man- 
ager of the local store in 1903. He employs twenty-seven 
persons and does an extensive business in this territory. 
The business of the store has doubled since Mr. Williams 
has been in charge. Over 250 stores are maintained in 
this country by this concern which imports teas, coffees 
and spices direct from their native lands. 

In 190,^ Mr. Williams married a Terre Haute girl. Miss 
Louetta Greggs, and he is here to stay. He is one of the 
new members of the Young Business Men's club. 




ARTHUR V. BAUR 




B 



ORN in Terre Haute over the drug store in 1870, and 
has been in it ever since. 



HARRY A. LEE 



«<fS Mr. Adams in?" 

This was the question asked Harry A. Lee, cashier 

of the Adams Express Company, not long ago. The 

questioner was a man who looked as though he should 

have known better. Cashier Lee disappeared behind the 

counter for a moment to recover himself. 

"Mr. Adams is not in. What can I do for you?" 
answered Mr. Lee. 

"I just wanted to ask him if he knew whether Jim 
Wilson had sent a package yet from Martinsville. Bin 
expectin' one fur some time and 'lowed Mr. Adams would 
know." 

As Mr. Adams was not present, the desired information 
could not be given. This is a sample of what comes up 
occasionally in the express business. But this sort of 
thing seems to have agreed with Cashier Lee, for it has 
not been long ago since he was not so husky as he is now. 
Mr. Lee has been with the Adams company for thirteen 
years. Two years of that time he served as a messenger 
on the old narrow gauge railroad, running from Effingham 
to Switz City. According to Mr. Lee, this was railroading 
to the limit. It was difficult at times to tell whether 
the express car was on the ties or on the rails, and fre- 
quently the employes on the train would get off and run 
ahead, riding the cow catcher for several miles as a diver- 
sion. 

Born on the last day of February, 1876. Mr. Lee is a 
citizen of Terre Haute by birth. He was graduated from 
the public schools and by his experience and close atten- 
tion to business is well fitted for the responsible position 
of cashier of the local office to which he was promoted 
five years ago. 





CHARLES R. HUNTER 



X TEXT to selling dry goods and notions, Charles Rowiu 
^ ^ Hunter would rather be mayor of Terre Haute. 
This is confidential. 

The truly great come from the farm or the village to 
the larger cities. Mr. Hunter was born in Farmersburg, 
Sullivan county, Indiana, in 1857. At ten years of age 
he was big enough to pull weeds and at eighteen was a 
great husky boy who could tire out a horse following the 
plow. 

It has been thirteen years since the subject of this 
sketch came to Terre Haute. The first job that he pro- 
cured was that of driving a transfer wagon, and he was so 
faithful in doing this work to the utmost satisfaction of 
his employer, that he soon gained the confidence of other 
men. He was employed for two years in the McKeen 
Brothers flouring mill, and then he accepted a position 
in the wholesale dry goods store of H. Robinson & Com- 
pany. For five years he was shipping clerk and made 
himself generally useful and valuable in other depart- 
ments. 

When he started out in life he had not idea of being a 
traveling salesman but he naturally gravitated into that 
profession and has been selling dry goods and notions 
since 1877. He has traveled for the C. L. Braman Com- 
pany, the Havens-Geddes Company, and at present repre- 
sents the Efroymson & Wolf wholesale dry goods company, 
of Indianapolis. He is a charter member of the T. P. A., 
assisting in the organization of the local association four- 
teen years ago. He has been state vice-president of the 
T. P. A., held various responsible committee positions, 
and is one of its most valued members. He also belongs 
to the U. C. T. If ever nominated and elected, Charles 
Rowin Hunter will make a good mayor. 



JOHN G. SHAW 



PATRIOTISM lurks within the breast of every American 
^ who has the least bit of blood in his veins, and when 
the Spanish- American war broke out, John G. Shaw 
could not resist the impulse to follow the flag. He has 
seldom referred to his army record but he served eighteen 
months in the regular sea coast artillery, and received an 
honorable discharge. 

He was about to enter the army the second time when 
he came to Terre Haute in 1898, but changed his mind 
and is glad that he did. Terre Haute is the native city of 
Mr. Shaw ; he was born here during the year of the Phila- 
delphia Centennial. He attended the manual training 
school until he became quite a chunk of a boy and then 
moved with his parents to IndianapoHs. As a student 
at the Shortridge high school the subject of this sketch 
was making good headway and was within three months 
of his graduation day when he secured a position in the 
locomotvie department of the Big Four railway shops at 
Brightwood. He became a good machinist and came to 
Terre Haute in the fall of 1898. But he was destined to 
have an all-round experience before becoming a book- 
keeper in the Terre Haute financial institution. Four 
years of his life were spent as a hotel clerk in Indianapolis. 
When he came back to Terre Haute in 1898, he gravitated 
to the old Gaeztte office where he remained until the sus- 
pension of the paper in 1904. During his years with the 
Gazette Mr. Shaw learned something about the mechanical 
end of the business and showed great versatility by getting 
into the front office where he could talk advertising, write 
"ads" or take subscriptions. He accepted the position 
of bookkeeper at the Terre Haute Savings Bank in 1904. 
Mr. Shaw was united in marriage with Miss Ameha F. 
Berny in 1902, and is the proud parent of two children. 





HARRY H. HUTTON 



IN 1887 Harry H. Hutton was delivering bundles for 
*■ Mr. A. C. Brice, who was at that time one of Terre 
Haute's well known clothiers. Harry has reversed 
matters somewhat since that time, and is now giving 
another boy a chance at the bundles. The bundles 
usually come first in any business, but a few boys have 
overlooked small details of this kind. Not so with Mr. 
Hutton. He has improved every opportunity and is 
now a partner in the firm of Ford & Hutton, clothiers and 
tailors. 

You would hardly suspect it, but the subject of this 
sketch never passes an engine of any description but that 
it attracts his attention, and he thinks of the three years' 
experience he had in running an engine in a tile mill at 
Grand View, Illinois. He was born at Grand View in 
1868 and passed through the public schools there, picking 
up what knowledge was available. It was upon the com- 
pletion of his studies in the country school that he took 
up engine running. He had enjoyed some experience at 
weed pulling, but yearned to be an engineer and had this 
wish gratified. For three years he fired the boiler and 
watched over a thirty horse-power engine in the village 
tile mill. Then he began clerking in his brother's store 
at Kansas. It was here that Mr. Brice met young Hutton. 
He was induced to come to Terre Haute to try his fortunes. 
Twelve years were spent at the Brice store and four years 
in the Tune Brothers clothing store. Three years ago 
Mr. Hutton accepted a position with Ford & Overstreet, 
later purchasing Mr. Overstreet' s interest in the business. 
The Hart, Schatfner & Marx line of clothing is carried by 
the firm, and it has a good booster in the junior member. 

Mr. Hutton is an Elk, a K. of P., a Maccabec and a 
member of the Young Men's Business Club. 



CHARLES STACY BATT 



tj/'^HARLIE," as all of his friends know him, was born 
right on Mason and Dixon's line, and it is only in 
recent years that he got so far north nf the line as 
Terre Haute. It is related of him that the first thing he 
did after arriving in this world was to shake hands with 
his nurse, and he has been shaking hands ever since, 
being a staunch advocate of this evidence of democratic 
principles. As he grew up he attended the public schools 
and the high school at Xew Albany, Indiana, for this was 
his birthplace, and then took a course in DePauw college. 

After leaving school he secured a clerkship in a railroad 
office, and was so successful in this line that within three 
years he was chief clerk in the Big Four freight oflfices at 
Louisville. Soon the legal microbe asserted itself as the 
romance of the railroad and its routine wore off, and he 
abandoned railroading to take up the study of law at the 
University of Michigan. He supplemented his law with 
several studies in the literary department, and while at 
Ann Arbor was a member of the leading literary and 
debating societies. He stood third in oratory in his 
graduating class, which was composed of three hundred 
students. While in college Mr. Batt took a great interest 
in athletics, being a member of the pedestrian and the 
'Cross Country Clubs. 

Having selected Terre Haute as the coming city of the 
middle west, Mr. Batt decided to locate there. He made 
a specialty in school of corporation law, mining law and 
damages, these being his three majors. His knowledge 
of these subjects has served him w-ell. 

He is an enthusiastic member of all the Masonic orders 
having been the youngest Knight Templar in his home 
Commandery two years. 





CHARLES G. REYNOLDS 



nPHE most important thing that Charles G. Reynolds 
does each day in the commercial life of Terre Haute 
is to measure the tjuantity of beer that passes from 
the big storage tanks of the Terre Haute Brewing Com- 
pany into the bottling dei>artment of the concern. His 
task is not completed until he steps into the office of the 
brewery and collects the amount of tax due Uncle Sam. 
With note book and pencil in hand, Charlie reads the 
gauges on the various tanks and when this is completed 
gives the signal which releases the amber fluid that is 
soon bottled, and a few days later unbottled into the 
throats of the Americans who like their beer fully as well 
as does the Teuton. 

Charles G. Reynolds is a citizen by birth. That is, he 
was born in Terre Haute, in 1872. 

Passing through the public schools he entered into the 
drug trade. He remained at the business long enough to 
gain a splendid knowledge of pharmacy, and in IS^^S 
purchased the drug store at Sixth street and the Big 
Four railway. He grew tired of making pills and filhng 
prescriptions of various kinds and was appointed a deputy 
in the revenue office under Revenue Collector John R. 
Bonnell, in lulv, 1002. He is really the tobacco and 
brewery deputy and fills the position in a very capable 
manner. 

Mr. Reynolds is a Knight Templar, and is also a member 
of the Maccabees. He has been ]iretty busy most of his 
life and has no pronounced fads, or at least but little 
time in whicli tn indulge them to a great extent. 



JOHN M. M'PEAK 



■ I 'HE name of McPeak is synonymous with juicy steaks, 
•*■ wholesome German or French fried potatoes, de- 
licious gravy, steaming hot coffee, and real country 
butter. There is a great difference between a pie counter, 
a boarding house and a real restaurant. The McPeaks 
have Terre Hauteans so well trained that they never think 
of going anywhere else to eat when their families desert 
them for the shore or Sullivan. 

John M. McPeak has made a success of the feeding 
business and his personality has something to do with 
his popularity. Did you ever meet a big man that was 
not somewhat good natured' There are many vexing 
things that come up in the restaurant business and to 
keep in good humor requires no small amount of patience, 
tact, and a tendency to overlook the oddities of some 
persons who are generally disagreeable at their meals. 
Suppose that one of these intensely disagreeable individ- 
uals should come into the McPeak restaurant and say, 
"Your coffee is weak, needs a little more real Mocha and 
Java." Mr. McPeak would be the man to say, "Sorry, 
very sorry. If you will wait I will make a new batch of 
coffee immediately." But as the subject of this sketch 
always serves good coffee, it is never necessary for him to 
say anything of the kind. 

John McPeak was born at Girard, Illinois, and for a 
time lived on a farm. He moved from Girard to Terre 
Haute at the age of twenty-one and associated himselj 
with his brother in the restaurant business. In 1901 he 
established a restaurant on South Sixth street, later 
moving to his present location, Xo. 773 Wabash avenue. 
As a caterer Mr. McPeak has a reputation for setting out 
good things to eat and serving them in proper style. At 
various lodge banquets he is in great demand. 





BERNARD J. RICHARDS 



DERNARD J. RICHARDS, one of the republican mem- 
bers of the city council, is from the Second ward, 
and is enjovinj; his first experience in politics. This 
member of tlic coiuicil declares he has no serious intention 
of introducing; such an ordinance as represented in the 
caricature. It is true that there is onisiderable sjiooning 
done in Collett ]iark, away from the fierce glare of the 
electric lights, but Councilman Richards insists that this 
is the sweetheart's privilege and not a subject for council- 
manic action. There are more weighty i|uestions to be 
considered by the city's solons, 

Mr. Richards came into the coinicil riding on the highest 
part of the republican landslide of 1904, and he has been 
kept Ijusy ever since looking after local legislation and 
attention to the wliolesale coal business. 

Comjiaratively few people know that the new coimcil- 
man is a native of England. He is; but left the land of 
John Bull Ijefore lie imbibed any English ideas. 

Mr. Richards was born in W'oodliouse, a suburban part 
of the great manufacturing city of Sheffield, in 1878. 
Mr. Richards, Sr., moved to the X'nited States with his 
family when Bernard was four years of age, first settling 
at Shelburn. A few years later tlic Ricliards brothers 
came to Terre Haute and engaged in the coal business 
with their father. An extensive wholesale business is 
transacted bv the firm whose menil)ers are interested in 
several nunes in the surrounding coal field. 



CHARLES F. HAUPT 



«<CHO\V ME" would be a very natural expression for 
Charles F. Haupt to use on various occasions, but 
especially if confronted by a rival who contended 
that his policy was about the best in the world. This 
query would come very easily, for Charles Haupt was 
born in the great "Show Me" state, on a farm near Cape 
Giardeau, in March, 1862. Just a common school — very 
common school education, to use the words of Mr. Haupt — 
was received by him in this particular neck of the woods. 

The future insurance hustler graduated from the farm 
at the age of twenty-two, and from the Terre Haute 
Commercial College in 1884. His first position liere was 
with the "Old Buckeye Cash Store," at Sixth street and 
Wabash avenue, where he remained nearly four years. 

Accepting a position in the First National Bank he 
remained there for eleven years. Since 1898, at which 
time Mr. Haupt became district agent of the Mutual 
Benefit Life Insurance Company, he has lieen busy in 
extolling the merits of the policies sold by his company 
and has influenced hundreds of men to look out for the 
future by investing in real good insurance. 

As a supporter of the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion Mr. Haupt is one of the staunchest, and is at present 
the treasurer of the local association. Recently he was 
elected a member of the Board of Children's Guardians, 
and is already familiarizing himself with the duties of the 
new position. Mr. Haupt does not belong to any secret 
order, on account of his aversion to goats. He is one of 
the few, very few men in Terre Haute who have never 
been a candidate for any public office. 




EMMETT F. RODENBECK 




EMMETT F. RODENBECK does not dress in such an 
ultra style as the caricature would have you believe. 
In fact he is rather modest, except when it comes to 
a discussion of tlie insurance business. This subject he 
has given deep study. He believes in insurance for the 
protection of the family mainly and he is right. The 
number of Connecticut Mutual policies written by Mr. 
Rodenbeck in this section of the country and the manner 
in which these poHcies stick, testify somewhat to the 
ability of the representative of the company, as well as 
to the popularity of the Connecticut Mutual. 

Mr. Rodenbeck is a native of Green county, Indiana, 
and was born on a farm near Switz City, in 1856. As a 
young man he availed himself of the educational facihties 
of Green county to the best extent possible, and then 
began teaching school. He was "wielding the birch" at 
the age of nineteen and continued in this profession until 
he was twenty-four. One year of this period he taught 
a school near lola, Kansas. In 1882 he came to Terre 
Haute and entered a business college. After completing 
his commercial course he entered the employ of the Havens 
& Geddes wholesale dry goods house. Then for a number 
of years he was connected with several of Terre Haute's 
best known firms. In May, 1896, he resigned his position 
as credit man at the wholesale house of Hulman & Com- 
pany and went into the life and fire insurance business. 
In 1897 he was appointed general agent of the Connecticut 
Mutual Life Insurance Company, having charge of the 
territory in western Indiana. An event which marked 
an epoch in Mr. Rodenbeck's hfe was his marriage to Miss 
Ehzabeth Ensey, of Terre Haute, in 1888. 

Mr. Rodenbeck is interested in the Young Men's Chris- 
tian Association, being one of the directors of that organ- 
ization. He is a memljer of both the Masonic lodges and 
the Knights of Pythias. 



HARRY O. BRONSON 



IJARRY O. BRONSON might have been a scientist as 
well as a promoter of entertainment, but fate de- 
creed otherwise. Polo was a comparatively new 
sport in this neck of the woods until Mr. Bronson and his 
brother Ross began figuring on a coliseum where polo 
could be played and Terre Haute would have at the same 
time a place large enougli for ])ublic meetings of all kinds. 
The game has met w'ith such favor in Terre Haute that 
the fans naturally feel under obligations to the Bronsons 
for the establishing of the s])ort liere. Now, even the 
small boys, who cannot prattle plainly understand the 
fine ]joints of polo, and the women, too, really know the 
game and enjoy it. Mr. Bronson has aspired to give 
Terre Haute a first-class vaudeville style of entertain- 
ment and the coliseum may yet serve as a popular place 
of recreation in summer as well as winter. 

Mr. Bronson was born in Terre Haute during the same 
year that Chicago experienced lier great fire When he 
was old enough he entered Notre Dame college at South 
Bend and remained there imtil he completed his junior 
year. After his return home he attended the Rose Poly- 
technic Institute for a time, but the sciences did not 
attract him so strongly as was expected. He was in the 
revenue office four years, a deputy under Judge Jump. 
Next, Mr. Bronson was associated with his brother, Ross 
Bronson, in the manufacturing of workingmen's gar- 
ments, the plant being located at Tenth and Chestnut 
streets. A fire destroyed the factory and Mr. Bronson 
then conducted the bath house and roller skating rink 
on Tenth street until the Coliseum was built. 




FRANK L. GILBERT 




AVZHO has ever heard of the little Isle of Guernsey? 
But few persons, to Ije sure, on this side of the big 
pond. It is a ]iart and parcel of the great pos- 
sessions of the British Empire. It has a curious mixture 
of French and English, some of the French customs still 
being greatly in evidence. This little island boasts of a 
thrifty population, tlic average wealth of each person 
being larger than that of any other country of its size in 
the world. Naturally, the descendants from the sturdy 
families of Guernsey must inherit some of the business 
instinct that makes a man successful. Frank L. Gilbert's 
father was born on this island and he was an Englishman. 
He came to the United States while yet a young man and 
located in Terre Haute. For years he conducted a con- 
fectionery and ice cream ])arlijr, which was one of the best 
known places of this kind in the city. 

As a boy, Frank Gilbert early developed the business 
side of his hfe, getting most of his education in the school 
of experience. He first established himself in the retail 
tobacco business in the Grand Opera House building and 
meeting with success, opened a second store on Wabash 
avenue. He is a wholesaler and retailer and handles but 
the best of high grade tobacco. The "Seminola" brand 
is so well known in Terre Haute that the average smoker 
needs no introduction to it. This particular cigar enjoys 
great popularity, first because the quality is all right, and 
secondly because Mr. Gilbert's methods of getting it on 
the market are the kind that bring results in any business. 
The pusher of the "Seminola" and other good brands 
of cigars is an Elk, a member of the Commercial club, the 
Young Business Men's club and the Wabash Cycling club. 



LOGAN G. HUGHES 



LOGAN G. HUGHES has talked about bicycles so much 
that he is almost a crank on the subject. Cranks are 
essential. For instance, wliat would the bicycle be 
without a crank? The wheel business is Mr. Hughes' 
hobby, and it has proved to be a profitable one. The 
wheel which he presents is the National. He has not only 
succeeded in impressing the Terre Haute public favorably 
with its merits but has established the fame of this same 
make in at least a dozen states, the territory of which he 
is in charge for the National company. 

This exponent of the wheel was born in Sullivan county, 
the same locality from which have emigrated a large num- 
ber of Terre Haute citizens. Mr. Hughes was born on a 
farm and served his time following the plow and the binder. 
He attended the country schools and after securing what 
education they afforded, learned the trade of stationary 
engineer. Terre Haute being the metropolis of South- 
western Indiana and affording greater opportunities than 
elsewhere, Mr. Hughes decided to locate here. He held 
several positions as an engineer with well-known manu- 
facturing concerns and in 1894 went into the bicycle busi- 
ness at his present location. Fourth and Ohio streets. He 
is associated with Charles M. and Wilham A. Miller and 
the firm does an enormous volume of business in the selling 
of wheels and wheel supplies. As the central agency for 
the National in this part of the country, the firm has a 
wide acquaintance. 

One of the pioneer members of the Wabash Cycling 
Club was Mr. Hughes and he is still an enthusiastic wheel- 
man. He has noted with no small degree of pleasure the 
revival in wheeling and is one of the most ardent advo- 
cates of the exercise as a means to health and happiness. 
In addition to being engaged in the wheel business Mr. 
Hughes is investing in real estate, having great faith in 
Terre Haute dirt as an investment. 

He is a Mason, an Elk, a Knight of Pythias, a member 
of the Young Business Men's Club and of Post G, T. P. A. 




L ''''.,„;"^'Tmrmt'f"->''-^' -^ 








H. A. CONDIT 



f THRE we have a good likeness of H. A. Condit, who is 
an enthusiastic Elk and also one of the well known 
members of the Terre Haute legal profession. His 
Elk friends have appreciated him so well, as secretary, 
that he has held this jjlace for the past five years. It is 
usually the secretary who is busy when others are taking 
it easy and this may be the reason the Elks have honored 
him with one of the most responsible positions in the lodge. 
The Condit name has been associated with Terre Haute 
for a good many years. Rev. Blackford Condit, the father 
of H. A. Condit, was one of the city's best known Presby- 
terian clergymen for years. A grandfather of Mr. Condit, 
Caleb Mills, was one of the first professors of Wabash 
college, and fathered the first public school law in Indiana. 
Naturally, when the subject of this sketch completed his 
work in the public schools, he went to Wabash college, an 
institution which his grandfather had helped to make one 
of the most famous in Indiana. While at school Mr. 
Condit was a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity and 
took an active interest in athletics and all other college 
sports. He received his degree of A. R. in 1890, and im 
returning home began the study of law in the office of 
Stimson, Stimson and Higgins. He was admitted to the 
bar in the same year. Mr. Condit is a member of the law 
firm of Stimson and Condit. If he has a pronounced 
hobby, it is the collecting of books, and he has already 
secured a number of rare volumes pertaining to different 
subjects. Mr. Condit is a member of the Columbia Club 
of Indianapolis and of the local Commercial Club. 



MARX MEYERS 



IT would be almost impossible to have a street fair — no, 
•^ not a "street fair," but a "carnival," if/you please — 
without the aid of Marx Meyers. Mr. Meyers objects 
to the expression "street fair," and for very good reasons; 
chiefly because the "street fair" has fallen into disrepute 
with the clerical profession and for this reason Terre Haute 
has never had anything but carnivals. But, as we were 
starting out to say — have you ever seen a real successful 
carnival without Mr. Meyers lending a helping hand? To 
him we have been indebted for some first class attractions, 
for the amusement end of the carnival and county fair, 
always falls to Mr. Meyers, who seems fully qualified to 
handle that kind of business. 

You would hardly expect anything good to come out of 
Evansville, but just the same that is the birthplace of 
Marx Meyers. He was born in the "Pocket City" in 
1859, December 26th, — he came within one of being a 
Christmas present. He graduated from the Evansville 
high school and after spending some time at a college in 
New York City, he went to Caseyville, Kentucky, where 
he was engaged in the clothing business with an uncle. 
In 1881 Mr. Meyers and his brother, Emil, came to Terre 
Haute. They opened a clothing store at the southwest 
corner of Fourth and Main streets. From the start the 
business grew rapidly, and in 1900 the firm moved to its 
present quarters in the new Naylor-Cox building. In five 
years' time the business of Meyers Brothers has tripled. 
This is the result of hard work and a liberal use of printers' 
ink. Mr. Meyers' liberality in all things may have some- 
thing to do with his popularity. He is first, last and all 
the time for Terre Haute. Aside from the attention he 
gives to the clothing business, he is vice-president of the 
Terre Haute Trotting Association and is also interested 
in the Indiana Savings and Building Loan Association, 
being vice-president of the latter. He is a member of the 
Knights of Pythias and of the Masons. 




If 'T 




EDWIN R. BRYANT 



OVER forty years ago Edwin R. Bryant accepted a 
position with the Vandalia railroad at Indianapolis 
as chief train dispatcher, and he has been with the 
company ever since. At that time — 1862 — there were 
four telegraph offices between Indianapolis and Terre 
Haute. Part of Mr. Bryant's work was to establish tele- 
graph offices and he increased the number consideraljly 
between 1862 and 1865. He first came to Terre Haute 
in 1865 and has been identified since that time with the 
Union line, paying particular attention to special service. 

Enfield, Massachusetts, is the birthplace of Mr. Bryant. 
He received his education in the village school there and 
at Northampton. Before he was of age he was learning 
telegraphy and accepted a position as a telegrapher on 
the old Boston and Portland road at Lawrence, Massachu- 
setts. The line was only a hundred miles long and mes- 
sages in those days were received on paper, small perfora- 
tions spelling out the words that were sent by the chief 
dispatcher. Operators in those days were not allowed 
to read by sound, as it was considered unsafe, the superin- 
tendent being fearful that mistakes would be made in the 
receiving of messages and wrecks would follow. After 
about five years at Lawrence, the young operator came 
west and accepted a position with the Lake Shore. Next 
he identified himself with the VandaHa. 

Mr. R. E. Ricker was the first superintendent of the 
Vandalia and Mr. E. J. Peck was president of the com- 
pany. These officials, as well as Chauncey Rose, are well 
remembered by Mr. Bryant, who is chock full of railroad 
reminiscences. As agent of the Union line Mr. Bryant 
travels a great deal on the Vandalia and connecting roads, 
but in his long railroad experience has never met with a 
serious accident. He has been in love with railroading 
from the start and will only quit when he is affected by the 
pension rules of the Pennsylvania system. Mr. Bryant is 
a Knight Templar. 



ELLIS E. SOUTH 



ELLIS E. SOUTH, sometimes known as "Colonel" 
South, is pointing the way to the Knickerbocker 
Special. According to "Colonel" South this is about 
the best train to New York and Boston, as well as other 
eastern points that can be taken by Terre Hauteans. The 
Big Four is not owned by Mr. South, but he has been just 
as loyal to its interests as if he controlled the majority of 
stock in the company. 

Mr. South has grown up with the Big Four. He was 
born at Brownsburg in Hendricks county, Indiana, in 
1851, and as a baby daily heard the toot of the Big Four 
trains on the Peoria division of the sytsem. He still kept 
within hearing distance of the Big Four trains when he 
lived at Danville and Greencastle and in these two towns 
secured his school training. At Danville he attended the 
Normal school for a time and at Greencastle spent two 
years within the halls of old DePauw. He didn't wait for 
a degree — he was too anxious to be a railroad man and 
began learning telegraphy at Danville in the Big Four 
station. His first regular position was at Tower Hill, 
Illinois, on the St. Louis division. Before coming to 
Terre Haute in 1883 he had worked either as ticket or 
freight agent in all of the offices along the St. Louis division 
He began here as ticket and freight agent at the old yellow 
depot of the Big Four at Sixth street. After ten years 
he was appointed general agent with downtown offices in 
the Terre Haute House. He has been popular with the 
traveling public and evidently has pleased the company 
first-class. 

"Colonel" South is one of the most popular railroad 
men in Terre Haute and if we should live for another 
hundred years we would still expect him to be connected 
with the Big Four, because he would not look natural in 
any other position. He is an Elk and a "way up" Mason, 
being a member of the Blue Lodge, Knights Templar, 
Royal Arch and the Mystic Shrine. 








HERMAN A. MAYER 



TN a few years from the present time, 1905, you may 
turn the pages of this l)ook and at certain places where 
a laugh may now be found no humor will then be dis- 
cernible, while on other pages an added smile may be 
discovered, placed there by the changes which time alone 
can bring. One notable change will be the shifting of the 
places of imjiortance in the conunercial and professional 
world from the older to the younger shoulders. A number, 
in ten or fifteen years, will have passed from the field of 
activity and many of the young men, like Mr. Mayer, for 
example, will be occupying the center of the stage. 

Herman A. Mayer, whom we find at the teller's window, 
is essentially a Terre Haute product. He was born here 
in 1880. He attended St. Benedict's ])arochial school and 
later entered Teutopolis College, at Teutopolis, Ilhnois, 
where he graduated Returnig to Terre Haute, he decided 
on a business career and when a good man was wanted for 
the position of teller at Terre Haute's newest and most 
splendid financial institution, Mr. Mayer was selected 
for the place. The Trust Company has one of the 
handsomest liuildings in the city, and while yet compara- 
tively young, is one of the soundest concerns in the state, 
being backed by ample capital and men well known in the 
community. 

Mr. Mayer is a member of the local lodge of Elks and the 
Knights of Columbus. 



DANIEL E. REAGAN 



There were "head blocks" in ye olden time and block- 
heads there were always; 
There are blocks of houses and houses of blocks, 

And blocks of streets and by-ways, 
But the best of all is our Hollow Block 
That everyone uses now-a-days. 

— Rhyme by Daniel E. Reagan. 

WE know that Mr. Reagan is an orator, but this will 
be the first time that some of his friends will know 
that he has been guilty of courting the muses. 
Mr. Reagan cannot be blamed. He is simply enthusiastic 
about a very excellent hollow building block made by his 
company. 

When Daniel Reagan graduated from the public schools 
of Indianapolis, he went into business with his father, 
Edward Reagan, a pioneer resident of the Capital City. 
Mr. Reagan, Sr., was a manufacturer of boilers. The son 
started out early in the manufacturing line and has stuck 
to it ever since. Coming here in 1882 he occupied the 
position of treasurer and general manager of the Blair & 
Failey Company for eight years. When the heading 
industry was crippled on account of the diminished timber 
supply, Mr. Reagan was associated with Mr. J. F. Failey 
and his sons in the organization of the Locust Land Com- 
pany. Mr. Reagan is president of the company. Hun- 
dreds of lots have been sold and hundreds of homes built 
in the northeast end of the city on this tract of land. 

In 1902 Mr. Reagan organized the Ayer-McCarel Clay 
Company, which has a modern plant at Brazil. The 
factory turns out vitrified clay products that lind a ready 
market. A splendid reputation for the quality of its 
hollow blocks and gray faced vitrified brick has been 
established. As president of the company, Mr. Reagan is 
obliged to spend much of his time in Brazil. 

His love of home is pretty well developed and he is the 
father of eight children. He was married in 1888 to Miss 
Virginia Wilds, of Natchez, Mississippi. He is a well- 
known Elk and district deputy of the Knights of Columbus. 




ClO YOO /\SK 
HOW I CAN 
HELP Voo 

TO eofLO 

A Mouse. 
UIKE THI6 f 




FRANK C. FISBECK 



TTERRE HAUTE is essentially a city of homes and the 
■*■ numerous building and loan associations have done 
their share toward contributing to the prosperity of 
the individual and enabling him to have a home of his own. 
Mr. Fisbeck is holding up a very neat cottage to view and 
if called upon to tell you how tu build such a residence, 
could give you some excellent advice. He is one of the 
veteran building and loan men of the town. 

Mr. Fisbeck came to Terre Haute from Indianapolis 
when he was two years of age, having been born in the 
Capital City in February, 1855. He attended the public 
schools, completing one year in the high school. Very 
few Terre Hauteans remember the "Burger Zeitung," 
but Mr. F'isbeck remembers the paper very well. It gave 
him a start in a small way. For some time he was the 
only route carrier of the German weekly covering that 
territory bounded by Fifteenth and One-half and Locust 
streets and Third and Hulman streets. This was a good 
deal of ground to get over but Mr. Fisbeck stuck with his 
job until he got something better, and that has been his 
policy ever since. 

One of the first positions Mr. Fisbeck jirocured was that 
of bookkeeper for the Hoberg-Root Company, which he 
held for twelve years. For seventeen years he was in the 
retail furniture business, and from helping people to fur- 
nish homes he began helping them to build them. 

In 1900 he was elected trustee on the repubhcan ticket, 
making a splendid showing in the race for votes. He 
filled the office in a very creditable manner and at a time 
when Terre Haute was growing very rapidly. During his 
incumbency three school buildings were erected and the 
teaching force increased from fourteen to twenty-five 
teachers. Mr. Fisbeck is financial secretary of the Mutual 
Building and Loan Association, and with his son, conducts 
a fire insurance and real estate business at No. 21 South 
Fifth street. 



SIMON L. SEGAR 



""rHERE is usually much of real live interest in a baby 
buggy. We have had Mr. Segar pose expressly so 
that we could give an accurate idea of what a matri- 
monial fruit basket is, and what it is used for. Xext to 
carpet sweepers, Mr. Segar would rather sell perambulators 
than anything else in his line of business. He knows that 
one of these rubber tired vehicles removes a burden from 
the family and brings smiles to the faces of mamma and 
papa. Mr. Segar is a father himself. 

One hustling advertising man who knows how to make 
the furniture business hum, came very near being a phys- 
ician. This was Mr. Segar. After attending Shortridge 
high school at Indianapolis, his native city, he began the 
study of medicine in the office of a well-known firm of 
physicians. He delved into physiology, anatomy and 
kindred subjects for a year and a half before he reached 
the conclusion that it was not intended for him to alleviate 
the physical ills of humanity by administering nauseous 
doses and recommending vacations to the sea shore and 
mountains. He became a traveling clothing salesman 
and was successful. Next he entered into the employ of 
the Reliable Furniture Company of Indianapolis and from 
the start showed great ability. When the company de- 
cided to establish a store in Terre Haute Mr. Segar was 
one of the men selected to help matters along, and as a 
consequence he is well known as the advertising man and 
assistant manager of the Terre Haute Furniture and Carpet 
Company. His "ads" get the business and the store has 
a reputation of giving the people their money's worth, 
which also brings them back again. 

Mr. Segar is very sociable and genial by nature and is one 
of the best known members of the Phoenix Club. 




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WILLIAM W. BROWN 



■ I "HERE used to be a time when it wasn't so necessary 
■^ to advertise. Advertising men will tell you it was 
during the middle ages that competition was less 
keen and the modern newspaper unthought of. We have 
progressed some since then. Mr. Brown has been 
caught in the act of quoting a rate in the Tribune- 
Gazette. Next to quoting you a rate he would rather 
close a contract. This last part he enjoys better than a 
square meal. Rates are higher in the newspapers of 
Terre Haute than they were several years ago, but the 
papers are better and their circulation more extensive. 
Incidentally it now costs considerably more to conduct a 
newspaper than formerly. This makes a difference. 

At a very early age Mr. Brown left the farm near Pi- 
mento, on which he was born, and attended the public 
schools in Terre Haute and also spent five years in the 
Gainesville, Florida, Military Academy. While in Gaines- 
ville he served as deputy assistant postmaster, and next 
embarked in the orange growing business. It was in 1895 
that the awful freeze struck Florida and the oranges at the 
same time. This act of nature blasted the hopes of Mr. 
Brown. He returned to Terre Haute and secured a posi- 
tion in the office of the Express. In 1898 he became 
business manager of that paper, and continued in this 
position until the paper was sold. He then joined forces 
with the Tribune-Gazette, becoming manager of the 
advertising department. He has seen a wonderful de- 
velopment in advertising in Terre Haute and has had 
much to do with bringing about the full page "ad" and 
the use of more space from merchants who formerly spent 
but a comparatively small amount for pubhcity. The 
more liberal use of the advertising columns has resulted 
in increased business for the merchant and has been re- 
sponsible for the Terre Haute newspaper managers giving 
the public as good daily papers as can be found anywhere. 



PATRICK W. HAGGERTY, JR. 



'T'HERE is no danger of Patrick \V. Haggerty, Jr., 
■*■ getting lost in Terre Haute. He was born in this 
city about twenty-eight years ago and is very well 
contented with the outlook. After attending St. Patrick's 
parochial school and the high school, Mr. Haggerty began 
his career. The first few acts of his early life were 
performed in a rolling mill where considerably more 
muscle than education was necessary. This did not sat- 
isfy him, and he looked for something better. He became 
an employe of the wholesale grocery house of Strong & 
Company and advanced through several positions to that 
of shipping clerk. Then he became a traveling salesman 
and sold goods in Illinois and Indiana. 

Believing that salesmanship was a pretty good pro- 
fession, Mr. Haggerty decided to try life insurance. He 
met with fairly good success as a representative of the 
New York Life Company but did not strike his gait until 
he became a member of the firm of Durham & Haggerty 
in 1902. Since then Messrs. Hagerty & Durham have 
made a number of big real estate deals and have an unfal- 
tering faith in Terre Haute's future. They have handled 
a number of additions in the best residential sections, 
disposing of hundreds of lots upon which are now being 
erected some of the coziest and nicest homes in Terre 
Haute. A general fire insurance business is conducted by 
the firm, a number of the best known companies being 
represented. Their offices in the Grand Opera House 
block are as commodious and convenient as any- in the 
city. 

Mr. Haggerty is recognized as one of the hustlers in the 
real estate business and is a member of the Young Business 
Men's Club. He is also an Elk and a member of the 
Knights of Columbus council. 





ORA D. DAVIS 



T TERE we discover Mr. Davis in his launch the " Bun- 
•^ ^ angie," leaving the foot of Walnut street for the Tish- 
i-mingo cottage, six miles up the classic Wabash. 
Attorney Davis is one of the faithful few who keep alive 
an interest in aquatics on the Wabash. Were it not for 
him and Paul Dressier we would hardly know that there 
was such a ])icturesque stream so near. Mr. Davis is the 
engineer of the "Bunangie" and at times he is assisted in 
navigating the river by "Skipper" John E. Cox, "Pilot 
and ex-officio Admiral" Fran Carmack and "Stevedore" 
George M. Crane. 

Newport, Indiana, was the birthplace of Mr. Davis and 
even before his graduation from the high school he had his 
mind fully made up to become a lawyer. For some time 
he studied law in the offices of Conley & Sawyer, and U]ion 
going to Ann Arbor was able to complete his course within 
one year's time. 

In December, 1891, Mr. Davis came from Ann Arbor to 
Terre Haute, carrying with him a crisp sheepskin from the 
University of Michigan law department, and began look- 
ing about for a place where he could crowd into the ranks 
of the lawyers. Judge Eggleston treated the young man 
very kindly and Mr. Davis remained in his office for three 
months. He then opened an office for himself. In 1893 
he formed his present partnership with John E. Cox. Mr. 
Davis has devoted much of his time to the phase of legal 
work pertaining to real estate, and building and loan 
associations. He also gives considerable attention to the 
examination of abstracts, titles and conveyances. One of 
the big events in the life of Mr. Davis was his marriage in 
1895 to Miss Bun Nixon, of Newport. As a member of 
the Elks, Knights Templar, Terre Haute Commandery 
and the Knights of Pythias, Mr, Davis has a wide acquaint- 



WILLIAM CLARK 



1\ yiR. CLARK is one of Vigo county's hired men. If you 
are unfortunate enough to have anything of value 
you must go to him and pay for the privilege of 
retaining it. At least that's the way some people look 
upon the question of paying taxes. But that's not the 
right way, of course. When you deposit your little por- 
tion with the county treasurer you are paying only a small 
price for the blessing of living in a land of culture and 
civihzation, where the protection of life and jjruperty and 
personal rights is assured, or else you have the privilege 
of starting a row at once to know the reason why. 

In the populous county of Vigo the office of treasurer is 
an important one. Mr. Clark seems to be managing it to 
the satisfaction of everybody, however. 

Mr. Clark was once a printer, but he has almost suc- 
ceeded in living it down. He learned his trade on the old 
Saturday Evening Mail and worked on the Express. He 
quit the printers' trade in 1882 to enter the grain buying 
business at Riley. It was down in Riley township, a 
democratic stronghold, that he gained some very good 
experience in pohtics. Although a republican, he was 
trustee in the township from 1894 to 1900. In November, 
1900, he was elected county treasurer, taking his office in 
January, 1902. He was re-elected in 1902. Mr. Clark 
has made a splendid showing in the collection of delin- 
quent taxes. He became city treasurer under the new 
city charter in 1902 and has given his attention to both 
the funds of county and city, in an able manner. For the 
past two years Mr. Clark has been county chairman for the 
republicans. 

Socially he is well known and is a member of several 
lodges, among them the Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the 
Woodmen and the Maccabees. 





HERBERT E. ROYSE 



T TAD tlie snapshot been taken a half second later, the 
scene would have been wholly different. The ball, 
for instance, would be entirely out of sight, cutting 
swiftly through the atmosphere of the farm adjoining the 
Country Club links. Mr. Royse is about to swat it. We 
are aware that isn't the correct word to use, but we news- 
paper folks are too busy to learn the game — to say nothing 
of learning golf terms — so that descriptive word must 
suffice to tell about what is to happen. 

While Mr. Royse is not up at the top in the game of the 
canny Scots he admits that it furnishes him considerable 
exercise and pleasure, and hence, he indulges in it as often 
as his business will permit. Mr. Royse is one of the 
younger business men of the town, and is secretary of the 
I. H. C Royse Company. A general real estate, in- 
surance and loan business is transacted and the firm is 
one of the best known in the city. 

Mr. Royse is a native of Terre Haute and is a graduate 
of the high school. He s]5ent two years at DePauw Uni- 
versity and two years at Baker University, Kansas. While 
in school he took a great interest in athletics and social 
affairs, and is a member of the Beta Theta Pi fraternity. 

As a member of the Country Club, he is chariman of the 
liouse committee, a most important position as every one 
knows when given the attention which Mr. Royse devotes 
to it. He was one of the first members of the Young Busi- 
ness Men's Club, which has become one of the most thriv- 
ing organizations in the city. 



WILLIAM E. HORSLEY 



WK must admit tliat William E. Horsley is admirably 
fitted by nature to be a sheriff. It requires a big 
man for the office and "Bill" fills the bill. Notice 
how easily he carries the prisoner to Vigo's bastile. While 
Sheriff Horsley is surrounded with several able deputies he 
does not permit them to make all of the arrests. Since 
going into office the sheriff has, alone and unaided, cap- 
tured six men who have defied the laws of this great com- 
monwealth, and in each case the man arrested has been 
convicted of his crime. This all within the space of a few- 
months. 

It was lucky for the sheriff that he has always been 
quite a good sized fellow, for his school career stopped 
when he was nine years of age. In order to help in the 
daily struggle, William chucked the books at this tender 
age and went to work hacking brick in a brick yard. At 
eleven years of age he was doing some heavy work in one 
of the rolling mills and at thirteen he was learning the 
brick layer's trade. When he was sixteen — at a time when 
most boys are entering the high school — the future sheriff 
was in the contracting business and yelling "more mortar" 
from the scaffolding of Terre Haute buildings. Naturally 
he made a large number of friends and with his jovial and 
genial nature was just the man to make the race for the 
nomination for sheriff on the republican ticket in 1904. 
He secured the nomination all right, and when the votes 
were counted at the election it was found that he had 
received the largest majority of any sheriff ever elected in 
Vigo county. He has a good record in the office thus far, 
and gives promise of carrying out the schedule to the dot. 

When Sheriff Horsley isn't busy arresting a prisoner or 
making out a bill of fare for the prisoners at the jail he is 
paying lodge dues. He belongs to the following organiza- 
tions: Knights of Pythias, Odd Fellows, Eagles, Red Men, 
Modern Woodmen, Maccabees, Loyal Order of the Moose, 
Wabash Cycling Club and the Pastime Club. 





MICAJAH T. GOODMAN 



""PHE first farm plat to be placed on file in the recorder's 
office was that of the Goodman farm in Sugar Creek 
township, and the filing of this plat was one of the first 
official acts of the present recorder when he came into the 
office in 1904. The Goodmans have been interested in 
farming and the breeding of good horses for so long a time 
tluit it is rather surprising to find one member of the 
family occujiying a jnibUc position. It's a family failing 
of the Goodmans to like good horses, and they have 
cleaned up about all of the red prize ribbons at the county 
fairs in this part of the state with their well-bred 
horses. 

Micajah T. Goodman was born (m a farm in Sugar Creek 
township in 1847. He attended the country schools and 
was nearing eighteen years of age when he enlisted in 
Company K, 133rd Indiana Infantry. Wlicn the young 
soldier was mustered out in 1865 he took his army pay 
and went to college at Westfield, Illinois, remaining there 
two years. Then he returned to farming and the breeding 
of fine horses. Always a good republican, he has taken 
more or less interest in politics, and for four years was a 
justice of the peace in his townshiii. Then he served two 
years as a member of the county council and in 1903 be- 
came a candidate for the nomination for county recorder. 
Upon taking his office, Mr. Goodman moved to Terre Haute 
but the love of the farm was too strongly implanted in him, 
and he went back to it. The recorder's office is being kept 
in tip-top shape and the recorder is assisted in his work 
by his son Fred, who acts as deputy. 



M. M. LINK 



uQHORTHAND opens the cUnir to business success." 
•^ Here is Principal M. M. Link, of Brown's Business 
College pointing out a truth to some of the students 
of his school. It may be a hidden truth to many, but the 
man or woman who began a successful business or com- 
mercial career will read it and say, " Link is right." 

Brown's Business College, located in the new Arcade 
building, has grown rapidly under the administration of 
Principal Link and is one of the best equipped schools of 
its kind in this part of the country. Mr. Link came to 
Terre Haute in July, 1902, and opened the school that fall 
with forty-eight students. The next year he had seventy- 
four students, and in September of 1904, one hundred and 
forty-seven students were enrolled, showing that the proper 
kind of management always brings results. Shorthand, 
business methods and telegraphy are given special atten- 
tion and Brown students have been successful in soon 
finding a place for themselves when leaving the school. 

Mr. Link is a Buckeye, and was born near Hillsboro. 
He attended Hillsboro conservatory, taking an academic 
course, and then went to the Northern Indiana Normal 
School, where he took both a scientific and Normal School 
training, afterwards entering the business department. 
He supplemented the commercial course by studying still 
further at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and then began his teach- 
ing career. Principal Link has been identified with some 
of the best known commercial schools in the country, 
among them the West Side Business College of Chicago, 
and the Walworth Business College of New York City. He 
came to Terre Haute from Racine, Wisconsin, and since 
his residence here promoted the Arcade building, securing 
the entire control of the building for a term of ten years, 
planning especially for a college, sub- let ting all rooms not 
required for the school purposes. Mr. Link has made 
many friends and is a member of the Centenary church 
board. Recently he was inducted into Paul Revere lodge. 
Knights of Pythias. 





WILLIAM M. MEYERS 



/^HIO has ever been generous to Indiana, and our sister 
'^ commonwealth has aided in building up Hoosierdom 
by contributing a real good citizen every once in a 
while. For years we have always looked to Ohio for great 
politicians and have not been disappointed, for not only 
have good politicians arisen from the obscure corners of 
the state, but great statesmen and even presidents have 
come to the front. 

While Ohio has attempted a corner on presidents, she 
has done fairly well in sending to Indiana men who figure 
prominently in the manufacturing world. William M. 
Meyers is a Buckeye, his native town being Mansfield. 
However, he received his education in Columbus and 
Toledo, graduating from the Toledo high school. He 
early caught the spirit of the hustling city on the Maumee 
and secured employment with the Toledo Bolt and Nut 
Company. After being with this company four years the 
plant was moved to Muncie and Mr. Meyers decided to 
cast his fortunes with his associates in the Hoosier gas belt. 
The Toledo Bolt and Nut Company was consolidated with 
the Indiana Iron Company and Mr. Meyers became cashier. 
Later the company was merged into the Republic Iron and 
Steel Company and Mr. Meyers was promoted to the 
position of chief clerk in the district manager's office. He 
received a splendid training in these positions and when 
the Highland Iron and Steel Company was formed he 
became secretary, coming to Terre Haute in 1901. 

While the duties of his position require a great deal of 
time, Mr. Meyers, who is a member of the Country Club, 
finds relaxation occasionally in golf, though he makes no 
brags at excelling in the game of the canny Scots. He is 
a member of the Commercial Club, wears the antlers of 
No. 86 Lodge of Elks, and is also a member of t!ie Young 
Business Men's organization. 



LEWIS D. BLEDSOE 



f EWIS D. BLEDSOE, republican councilman from the 
^-~' Third ward, has been in Terre Haute twenty-four 
years. Practicially all of this time he has been in 
the employ of the Vandalia Railroad Company in the 
freight department. As chief clerk he probably hears 
almost as many kicks in a single day as the express agent, 
the telephone operator or the hotel clerk. \o sooner does 
he get the mail opened in the morning than the telephone 
rings and he gets something like this: 

"What's the matter with that bill of goods I ordered 
from New York? I received the bill of lading two days 
ago! The Vandalia line beats the band. If you can't do 
better after this, I'll have to ship by some other road." 

Then it's up to Mr. Bledsoe to pacify the unreasonable 
person and tell him that the United States mails are 
carried just a little bit faster than freight. 

With his many duties Mr. Bledsoe has kept a cheerful 
disposition. He is always at his post and is a good citizen. 
When Councilman A. W. Vaughan was selected as a mem- 
ber of the board of public works, Mr. Bledsoe was ap- 
pointed by the council to the vacancy from the Third 
ward. He has filled the position with dignity and credit, 
but does not yearn to continue in it. He was one of the 
few men not a candidate for nomination and re-election 
to the council in the last primary. 

Mr. Bledsoe was born in Seymour, Indiana, April 18, 
1862. He resided at Columbus, Indianapolis and Evans- 
ville before making Terre Haute his home. He is an 
enthusiastic member of Company No. 3, Uniform Rank, 
Knights of Pythias. For some time he has been inter- 
ested in the affairs of the Terre Haute Casket Company 
and is a director in the concern. 








WILLIAM E. BELL 



IF Dr. Bell had shown as strong a liking for the farm 
earlier in life as he does now, the chances are that the 
medical profession would have lost a very valuable 
member. The doctor enjoys nothing better than going 
out to the farm, surveying the fields of growing grain and 
hearing the lowing of the kine. He is broadening out in 
agricultural matters, recently acquiring an interest, along 
with a number of other Terre Hauteans, in one of the 
counties of North Dakota where a big stock ranch will be 
maintained. 

Dr. Bell had his first experience on a farm near the 
town of Rosedale, Parke county, where he was born in 
1866. As a small boy he did the chores and milked the 
cows. However, at the age of fourteen, he came to Terre 
Haute and escaped a farmer's life. He spent one year in 
a local business college and then became bookkeeper and 
prescription clerk in the establishment of Cook & Bell. 
He remained there two years and then entered the high 
school. On quitting school he learned shorthand and 
accepted a position later in Indianapolis with the Terre 
Haute Car Manufacturing Company. Having had the 
medical profession in view for several years. Dr. Bell 
entered the medical department of Cincinnati University 
graduating from that institution with a splendid record. 
He began his practice here and has become known as one 
of the city's best surgeons, giving much attention to that 
branch of the profession. He was one of the six physicians 
who organized the Terre Haute Sanitarium which later 
became the Union Hospital. Dr. Bell has been deeply 
interested in the welfare of this charity institution and has 
been a member of the staff since the first, working earn- 
estly to increase the faciUties of the hospital and place it 
f)n a solid basis. His labors have not been in vain. 

Dr. Bell belongs to the Vigo Medical Society, the Aes- 
culapian Society, the Indiana State Medical Association 
and the American Medical Association. He is a great 
lover of hunting and fishing and enjoys these sports when 
he is afforded time for recreation. 



JEROME W. DENEHIE 



FOR some time the county auditor's office was in need 
of a better repository for the valuable papers that are 
taken care of by the auditor. A glance at the pic- 
ture, however, shows a strong safe in which the county's 
property is snugly kept. Getting this safe was a hobby 
with Mr. Denehie and he finally won out. 

Jerome T. Denehie, who occupies the position of county 
auditor, got there by hard effort, making the race for the 
plum in 1902. He hustled over the county from one end 
to the other interviewing his republican friends and some 
of his trends who were not republicans, and when the votes 
were counted he found that he had landed l)y a majority 
of 750 votes over his opponent, and led the county ticket. 
He was inducted into office in January, 1904. 

Nineteen years of Jerome Denehie's life were spent on a 
farm. He was born in Fayette township, October 30, 
1856. After a number of years Mr. Denehie lived for 
some time east of the city before becoming an urbanite. 
The common schools and the Garvin Commercial College 
provided Mr. Denehie with some of his fighting equipment 
and the rest of his education was picked up in the univer- 
sity of experience. After some time served in the grocery 
business and with the American Express Company, Mr. 
Denehie enlarged his knowledge of human nature by be- 
coming a hotel clerk. For fifteen months he was the 
autocrat of the desk at the old Bronson Hotel. From 
there he went to the Hudnut Milling Company, remaining 
with this company for ten years, being a salesman on the 
road for seven years. 

Mr. Denehie's entrance into politics was in 1894 when 
he became a candidate for city treasurer. He was de- 
feated but was capable of making a still harder fight as 
was shown later on. In 1896 he was appointed a deputy 
in the office of County Auditor James Soules and remained 
in this position until 1902, when he resigned to make the 
race for county auditor. Mr. Denehie is one of the best 
known members of Post G, T. P. A., a Knight of Pythias 
and a member of the Modern Woodmen. 





WILBUR O. JENKINS 



WHILE Dr. Wilbur O. Jenkins is one of the most 
modest men in his profession, he can lay claim to 
one distinction that is not disputed. He was the 
first physician in Terre Haute to introduce the closed cab 
in making his round of patients. The queer box-like 
carriage attracted no end of attention when it first ap- 
peared on the streets. It was an innovation and has 
proved a blessing to the physician who is com]5elled to 
make drives in all kinds of weather and at all hours. It 
was not so very long after Dr. Jenkins and his cab became 
familiar to the public that the other physicians followed 
suit. 

Dr. Jenkins began the practice of his profession in 
Terre Haute in 1884. He had just received a diploma from 
the Medical College of Ohio at Cincinnati, and decided 
that Terre Haute was about the best town in the state 
for a young physician. He was right, and has not re- 
gretted selecting this particular spot. Dr. Jenkins was 
born in the town of Franklin, Johnson county, Indiana, 
where his father was a Methodist clergyman. He failed 
to keep track of all the towns that he subsequently lived 
in, but during the early years of his life he was a resident 
of Jeffersonville, Shelbyville and Indianapolis. He at- 
tended the Indianapolis city schools before going to 
Moores Hill College, where he received the degree of A. B. 
in 1881. Later, in 1884, he received the degree of A. M. 
and M. D. 

For twenty years the doctor has been a member of the 
staff of St. Anthony's hospital. He is also surgeon of the 
Southern Indiana Railroad and is so busy that he has 
little time to indulge in fads. Few doctors are good 
politicians, but Dr. Jenkins was chairman of the city 
republican committee in 1889 and served as chairman of 
the republican county committee very acceptably in 1890. 
For four years he was a valued member of the city board 
of health. He is a member of the Vigo Medical Society, 
the State Medical Association, the Aesculapian Society 
and the American Medical Association. 

The social side of the doctor's life has been developed 
as a member of the Elks and the Masons. He belongs to 
the Terre Haute Commandery and Council, and is a Royal 
Arch Mason and a Shriner. 



FRANK M. DUNKIN 



FRANK M. DUNKIN, the democratic member of the 
school board Ijeheves in good, substantial school 
buildings and enough of them to properly house the 
coming generation. He knows something about the needs 
of the children, for he taught school in Indiana twenty 
years and at a time when comfort was not altogether the 
thing most sought after in connection with education. 

Mr. Dunkin entered old Asbury University at Green- 
castle just as soon as he left the farm on which he was 
born near the college town. He spent two years in that 
institution. He had just finished his sophomore year when 
the civil war began and he enlisted at Quincy, Owen 
county, in August, 1861, in the Thirty-Third Indiana 
Regiment. He served three years and was mustered out 
in September, 1865. Mr. Dunkin was one of the men 
captured at Thompson Station by a detachment of Gen- 
eral Forrest's Cavalry and was taken to Liljby prison 
where he had an experience that he does not care to have 
repeated. When he returned to Putnam county, he began 
teaching school and followed this profession for twenty 
years. He came to Terre Haute in 1886, having been 
appointed a government storekeeper in the revenue office 
under the Cleveland administration. 

After four years as storekeeper, Mr. Dunkin became 
associated with the Riddle-Hamilton Company in the 
fire insurance and real estate business. He talks just as 
fluently on tornado, life, boiler, plate glass, or accident 
insurance as he does on the fire insurance end of it, and is 
widely known among the business men of Terre Haute. 
As a democrat he was elected a member of the school 
board in 1903. Since he has been in office Mr. Dunkin 
has seen the new Eighth district Ijuilding erected and 
noted needed repairs made on other school buildings. He 
has favored new structures in keeping with the growth 
of the city. He is a member of the Blue Lodge of the 
Masons and a Knight of Pythias. 




1 !^lV^ft^(^li« 



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CHARLES L. HARTENFELS 



OEPTEMBER 1, 1901, Charles Hartenfels accepted the 
^ position of general agent for the Southern Indiana 
Railroad in Terre Haute, and on September 17 of the 
same year the first passenger train on the new road was 
started out of the union depot for its trip to Bedford, the 
southern terminus. Since that time Mr. Hartenfel has 
been hustling around in the interests of his company, first 
at the freight house and then at the downtown office. He 
knows all about rates and is one of the most obliging ticket 
sellers in town, 

Charles Hartenfels was born in Mansfield, Ohio, the 
home of John Sherman and M. D. Harter, the latter a 
great free trader. He finished his course of study in the 
public schools and then attended Ada College at Ada, 
Ohio, intending to prepare himself as a school teacher. 
He taught school but one term, and in that brief time he 
couldn't help continuing to hear the roar of the locomotive 
and the clanging of the engine bell. As a boy he had 
worked as a messenger at the Erie station in Mansfield, 
and after ending the school term he began his railroad 
career. He first went to Iowa, where he joined a railroad 
surveying outfit of the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific. 
Later he returned to Ohio and secured a position with the 
Erie in its freight and passenger department. In 1889 
Mr. Hartenfels went to Evansville, Indiana, and accepted 
a position with the Ohio Valley Railroad. For three 
years he was chief clerk in the freight department of the 
road. Then lie came to Terre Haute, accepting a place 
as bill clerk with the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad. 
He resigned this position to return to the Ohio Valley, as 
Evansville agent, but again returned to the Evansville & 
Terre Haute and Chicago and Eastern Illinois in Terre 
Haute. After holding various responsible positions 
with the roads mentioned, he became general agent of the 
Southern Indiana. 



JOHN L. SMITH 



ly/JR. JOHN L. SMITH, vice-president of the Highland 
*■' *■ Iron and Steel Company, is shown here shouldering 
his portion of the management of that large con- 
cern, one of the very best industries in Terre Haute. Born 
to the business, for his father before him was an iron and 
steel worker, Mr, Smith is practical in the broadest sense 
of the word. His shoulders are broad enough for the 
responsibility placed upon him, but he isn't obliged to 
shoulder any bar steel just at present. He has done his 
share of hard work when the industry was in its infancy 
and has seen rapid strides made in the manufacture of 
iron and steel products. 

Mr. Smith was born in East St. Louis, IlUnois, in 1863, 
when the place did not have a population of more tlian 
six hundred persons. His first work in a rolling mill was 
in the old Harrison plant at St. Louis, and after two years 
there he went to Springfield, Illinois, where he accepted 
a position with the Springfield Iron and Steel Company. 
For ten years he was in Youngstown, Ohio, where he 
learned the trade of a roller. Later he was located at 
Duncansville, Pennsylvania, returning to Youngstown for 
a short time and then moving to Muncie. While in tlie 
gas belt city Mr. Smith was head roller for the Indiana 
Iron and Steel Company and became the general super- 
intendent of the paint. Then he spent one year and a 
half with the Republic Iron and Steel Company. Mr. 
Smith had much to do with the planning of the local mill 
when he became associated with the promoters of the 
Highland Iron and Steel Company and came to Terre 
Haute in 1901. 

Mr. Smith is an Elk and a thirty-second degree Mason. 
He believes in the future of Terre Haute and as a member 
of the Commercial Club is helping to push things along. 





FRANK CONRATH 



T TEREWITH is presented an excellent likeness of a 
young man who is well known in the retail shoe 
business. He has taken an interest in footwear 
ever since he was big enough to make change, and he has 
fitted a good many thousand feet since he has been in 
business in Terre Haute. The program seen in Mr. Con- 
rath's coat pocket may indicate something of the social 
side of his nature, for he has friends and lots of them. 

He is one of the few persons born in Vincennes that had 
courage enough to leave Alice and the fanciful history 
that has been woven about her. When just a small boy 
Mr. Conrath landed in Terre Haute and he considers this 
big spot on the ma]) as about the best in all Hoosierdom. 
Frank, as he is familiarly called, entered into the shoe 
business when he was thirteen years of age in the capacity 
of a salesman and he has stuck with it ever since, believing 
in the old adage that "a rolling stone gathers no dough." 
It wasn't very long after he began to learn about salesman- 
ship until he was in business for himself and he has been 
paddling his own canoe ever since. By his genial dispo- 
sition, perseverance and honest efforts he has gained the 
confidence of the public and has a host of warm personal 
friends. No retail shoe store is better known than the 
Conrath, at .^28 Wabasli avenue. 

Mr. Conrath is a member of the Young Men's Institute, 
the Knights of Columbus and the Merchants' Association. 
He is too busy to indulge in very many fads but never 
misses a little social affair when it is convenient to be 
there. 



EDWARD B. COWAN 



A N epidemic of hog cholera in 1881 is mainly respon- 
sible for Edward B. Cowan being eligible for the 
office of councilman-at-large. If it had not been 
for the contagion which shattered his hopes as a breeder 
of hogs he might still have been engaged in that business 
on a farm north of the city. It was in 1880 that Mr. 
Cowan, his father and brothers engaged in the hog busi- 
ness and it was in 1881 that they retired therefrom on 
account of the death of every porker, large and small, 
from disease. 

For several years afterward Mr. Cowan was engaged in 
the fruit and dairy business with his brothers, and then he 
decided to become a florist. For nearly two years he was 
with John G. Heinl and then accepted a position with the 
M. A. Hunt Floral Company. He remained with the Hunt 
company nine years, and together with his brothers es- 
tablished the greenhouses at the corner of Twenty-First 
and Spruce streets. Mr. Cowan is manager of the com- 
pany. In 1904 Mr. Cowan first became interested in 
politics, and was the republican candidate for councilman- 
at-large, residing in the Fourth ward. He went into the 
office with a majority of 1400 votes over his opponent. 
He does not believe in giving valuable franchises away to 
corporations, and has already put himself on record in 
this respect. There is considerable Scotch blood in the 
veins of Mr. Cowan, for his parents and brothers and sis- 
ters were all born near Edinburgh. This may account for 
his "sticking" up for the rights of the people when meas- 
ures that look suspicious are introduced by clever lobby- 
ists. Orange county. New York, was the birthplace of 
the new councilman. He was born in 1869 and came to 
Terre Haute in 1873. 





CHARLES F. M'CABE 



HERE is a man who is a Sucker; l)ut he doesn't look 
like it. 

Charles was born in Illinois, at Areola, right in the 
heart of the great broom corn belt. As soon as he knew 
how, he left his neighbornig Suckers and landed in Hoosier- 
doni. Since landing here he has not been like a fish out 
of water. He has been right in the swim all of the time. 

E'rom his elevated position he can easily see whether the 
other man is working or not, and can take a sun bath at 
the same time. 

We have never seen Mr. McCabe in the garb that the 
artist has given him, but we know he is not afraid of work. 

As secretary and treasurer of the Hnoton Lumber Com- 
]>any, he keeps very busy and as a consequence has a 
valuable knowledge of the lumber industry. 

Charles left Areola when he was twenty-one years of 
age and came to Terre Haute, where he took a course in a 
Ijusiness college. His first jxisition was with the Wabash 
Lumber Company, and next lie became identified with the 
Hooton Company. The concern is one of the largest in 
the middle west, having a Ijig business in Danville, Illinois, 
in addition to the one in Terre Haute. 

Xext to talking about lumber, Mr. McCabe would prefer 
to discuss ])olo or baseball. He was one of the most 
ardent sup])orters of tlie Hottentot polo team last season 
and stuck to it until the end. He is a member of the 
lumbermen's order, tlie " Hoo-Hoos," and is also a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of Elks, No. 86. 



FRANK A. TABOR 



TJ'ELI-OW physicians of Dr. Frank A. Tabor will agree 
that we have discovered his hobby — baseball. He 
has the distinction of being the greatest dyed-in-the- 
wool baseball fan among the doctors in the city. If all of 
the fans rooted as hard as the doctor perhaps the Hotten- 
tots would be located in a loftier position in the percentage 
column. However, through good luck and bad luck, Dr. 
Tabor is loyal to the team. In his mind, baseball is truly 
the great American game, possessing great advantages 
over all other outdoor sports. We agree with the doctor, 
and so does every other sane American who knows the 
rules of the game, or even a few elements of it. 

Terre Haute is the birthplace of Dr. Tabor and he has 
never seen any other city that he liked better. For a time 
he thought he would be a school teacher. He spent two 
years at the Normal and taught three years. Using the 
teaching profession as a stepping stone to that of medicine 
he entered the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis in 
1892 and remained there two years. Then he became a 
student at the Indiana Medical College, and was graduated 
from that institution in 1898. Dr. Tabor began the prac- 
tice of his profession in Terre Haute. He has served as 
physician to the county poor and the board of children's 
guardians. He made the race for coroner on the demo- 
cratic ticket in 1902, and won out at the election by 
twenty-one votes over his opponent. Usually a repub- 
lican coroner is elected in Vigo county by a majority of 
from 800 to 900 votes, so you can see that Dr. Tabor did 
some tall hustling. He is a member of a large number of 
secret and fraternal societies, among them the Knights of 
Pythias, the Odd Fellows, the Maccabees and the Red 
Men. 





WILLIAM P. PEYTON 



"VVT'ILLIAM P. PRYTON first began the study of foot- 
wear on a farm in Parke county. As a boy he had 
the habit of abandoning footwear in the summer 
time, especially when he followed the plow through the 
long rows of waving corn. As he grew older it dawned 
upon him that it was neither fashionable nor popular to 
have tlie feet unadorned and that there might eventually 
be some money in the shoe business. He is glad now that 
he gave the subject so much thought. At twenty years of 
age Mr. Peyton left the waving corn and came to Terre 
Haute, where he took a course in one of the local business 
colleges. His first position was with the J. R. Duncan 
Company, where he was bookkeeper for a time. Next he 
went into the office of Haven & Geddes and was head book- 
keeper there for nine years. After three years in the 
real estate Ijusiness with the I. H. C. Rosye Company, 
Mr. Peyton engaged in the shoe business for himself on 
East Wabash avenue. This was in 1899. Mr. Peyton 
formed a partnerslii]) with his l)rother, John K. Peyton, 
two years later, and the firm now has the only exclusive 
shoe store on East Wabash avenue. 

Mr. Peyton has never engaged in politics. He has the 
distinction of lacing the only republican in a big demo- 
cratic family. He is a member of Amico Lodge of Odd 
Fellows and is also a member of Occidental Lodge of the 
Knights of Pythias. 



ISAAC G. READING 



A T first glance you might think Mr. Reading is a "big 
stick" constituent of President Roosevelt. In this 
caricature we have represented Mr. Reading as 
president of the Manufacturers Club and manager of the 
American Car and Foundry Company's plant. "Gun- 
boats" and "Gondolas" are turned out at this big industry 
and Mr. Reading is the man that wields the "big stick" 
while seeing that the cars are made right in all respects. 
Where there is smoke there is always fire, and the volume 
of smoke from the big stack is indicative, not only of the 
prosperity that the car works are enjoying, but of the 
activity of the other Terre Haute factories as well. 

Mr. Reading was a little bit too late to be considered as 
a Christmas present and almost too early to be counted a 
New Years' gift when he appeared in Ringoes, New Jersey> 
December 30, 1861. He was reared in this little New- 
Jersey village and received a common school education. 
One of his first positions was with the Lackawana Iron 
and Coal Company, at Scranton. He was six years in the 
rolling mill business. For several years he was in charge 
of the inspection department of the Robert W. Hunt Com- 
pany, of Chicago, giving particular study to railroad 
equipment. He resigned his position with the Chicago 
company in 1903 to come to Terre Haute as manager of 
the car works. 

In April of this year Mr. Reading was elected president 
of the Manufacturers Club, which has its offices in the 
Arcade building. Forty of the leading industries of Terre 
Haute are represented in this organization. 





CHARLES H. PAYNE 



/^HARLES H. PAYNE is a paper man, althougli not a 
newspaper man. 

In social affairs there are wallflowers, but in busi- 
ness affairs Mr. Payne is not one of these. He believies in 
decorating homes. He puts flowers on the walls in end- 
less variety. Mr. Payne very early learned the distinction 
between a tintype and a Rembrandt without the aid of a 
glass and soon drifted int(] the general decorating business. 
He has never presided at a lynching bee but can direct his 
men just how to hang a curtain. He can aid you in select- 
ing beautiful designs for decorating the parlor walls. He 
can even help you out in the dining room. Just invite 
him in aufl see. 

Mr. Payne was Ijorn in the lieautiful little city of Wood- 
stock, Canada, and there began his first decorating work. 
Later he moved to Hamilton, Canada, where he resided for 
several years. In 1885 he crossed the line at Detroit and 
was connected with Dean & Company, one of the best 
known firms in that city, luitil 1892 when he received an 
ofl'er of a position in Terre Haute. Mr. Payne entered 
into business for himself in 1894 and since that time has 
decorated at least seventy-five per cent, of the finest 
homes in Terre Haute. Xot only have his services always 
been in great demand in the homes of Terre Haute, but 
he has put the city in gala attire for numerous carnivals 
and fairs, being an expert in this line. Mr. Payne is an 
Elk, a Knight of Pythias and a member of the Commercial 
Club. 



GABRIEL DAVIS 



AV/HAT would Terre Haute be, nnisically, without the 
Davis family? We of course mean the family of 
which Gabriel Davis is a member. Of all the sweet 
voiced singers the Welsh people have given us the best, 
and " Gabe" Davis is of Welsh descent, which may account 
for his popularity in a vocal line. He has always been 
musical and to just help musical culture along Mr. Davis 
is engaged in the business of selling pianos, being the city 
salesman for the D. H. Baldwin Company. 

He was born in South Terrac Bank, England, and came 
with his parents to this country when he was nine years 
of age. Youngstown, Ohio, was his first ])lace of resi- 
dence. After attending the public sch(.)ols, Mr. Davis 
went into the iron business. It was a lucky thing for this 
city when Mr. and Mrs. Davis moved to Terre Haute, 
bringing with them their six boys, all of whom i^ossessed 
good voices. The church choirs received some new ma- 
terial at that time and they haven't been able to do without 
the Davis boys since then. Gabriel Davis engaged in the 
iron business here first, following a trade that had been in 
the family for some time. \ext he was with the Van- 
dalia railroad for six years and then became connected 
with the Baldwin Company. 

Terre Hauteans will always identify Gabe Davis with 
his production of "The Chimes of Normandy" which was 
presented in the old Xaylor theatre. He has sung in 
nearly every choir in the city and for ten years was in 
the Temple Israel choir, his fine bass voice being a feature 
of the Jewish services. Mr. Davis is an Elk, a Mason, an 
Eagle, a member of Masonic lodge No. 19, and of the Ben 
Hurs. 












WILLIAM PENN 



(( TAMES LACEY, a 
J Vandalia, died y 



a former well known employe of the 
yesterday at his home in Echo Knob, 
Kentucky." 

The above paragraph, or one similar to it, has appeared 
annually in the Terre Haute newspapers for the last fifteen 
years. James Lacey is a creature of the imagination, and 
the announcement of his death is worked off on every 
new reporter who comes to Terre Haute, by William Penn, 
the representative of the Vandalia passenger department 
in the downtown ticket office. 

William Penn is a native of Frankfort. Kentucky, and 
should have the title of colonel, for all Kentuckians by 
right of birth generally wear such a prefix to their name. 
In July, 1860, William Penn saw the first glimmer of light 
in the beautiful blue grass region, where all horses are fast 
and all women beautiful. After completing his work in 
the public schools, young Penn was sent to Ghent College 
Kentucky, near Cincinnati. Here he took a literary 
course, remaining two years. 

Mr. Penn never thought of becoming a railroad man. 
He came to Terre Haute in the fall of 1880 to break up the 
chills and at the same time to visit a brother. The Wabash 
"shakes" were so mild in comparison with the Kentucky 
chills, that he decided to remain here. He went to work 
for Mr. W. D. Tuell of the Terre Haute and Southeastern 
railway, as a clerk, and took a strong liking to the railroad 
business. He assisted in several engineering surveys and 
was on the trip when the South Bend line was laid out. 
Next he went into the freight department of the Vandalia 
as a clerk, served some time in the auditor's and pay- 
master's offices, and was later transferred to the city 
ticket office as assistant city ticket agent. 

Mr. Penn has occupied high offices in the gift of the 
Masonic order and is a member of Terre Haute Lodge No. 
19. He is a member of the Jackson Club and has always 
been a democrat in politics. 



THOMAS W. MOORHEAD 



A ROUND the festal board, especially at a gathering of 
^ *• the Aesculapian Society or at the banquets of the 
local medical societies, Dr. Thomas W. Moorhead 
is always in demand as a toastmaster. Physicians as a 
rule are not born orators, nor as a rule, do they ever be- 
come orators. They cut and slash too much. They 
administer too many unpleasant doses. People submit to 
what they do and take what they give because they think 
they have to do so. Dr Moorhead, when officiating as a 
toastmaster, does not cut and slash too much, nor does he 
give nauseating doses. His bitter pills are always sugar- 
coated and this is why he is popular as a toastmaster. He 
is called by some of his associates the "Chauncey Depew" 
of the medical profession. 

Dr. Moorhead is a native of Vigo county and received 
his common school education here, graduating from the 
high school. After finishing at the high school he attended 
the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy and took a course 
in chemistry. He next matriculated at the University of 
Pennsylvania in the medical department and received Iiis 
medical training at this school and at the Indiana Medical 
College. Crawfordsville was the first place the doctor 
selected in which to practice his profession, but after re- 
maining there two years he returned to his native city. 
He has had a successful career as a practitioner in Terre 
Haute and for years has been the surgeon for the Big Four 
Railway. In 1904 Dr. Moorhead was honored by being 
elected president of the Aesculapian Society, the oldest 
medical society west of the Alleghanies, and one that has 
a membership of about three hundred. The society was 
formed in 1846 and many noted members of the profession 
have belonged to it. The doctor is also a member of the 
local societies, the National Association of Railway Sur- 
geons and the American Medical Association. 




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WILLIAM J. WHITAKER 



ITAVE you ever noticed that most of the lawyers were 
born on farms and that previous to their taking up 
the practice of law they taught school for several 
years? Probate Judge William J. Whitaker is one of the 
lawyers who have come from the ranks of the pedagogues. 
Anyone who has brandished the rod in Vigo county ought 
to be able to practice law in the county's capital. 

Judge Whitaker's parents were farmers and besides rais- 
ing crops they "raised" him. He was born in Linton 
township in 1865 and lived on the farm until he completed 
his work in the graded schools. Then Mr. Whitaker 
entered the Indiana State Normal School. He received a 
sheepskin from that institution in 1886 and began looking 
about for a school where he might instruct the younger 
generation. For three years he wielded the spelling book 
and boarded around and then packed his trunk and went 
to Ann Arbor, where he began the study of law in the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. He applied himself so assiduously 
to Blackstone and the books written by Cooley that he 
completed two years' work in one. He returned to Terre 
Haute and became a partner in the jiractice of law witli 
Attorney S. K. Duvall. Mr. Whitaker served as deputy 
prosecutor under Prosecutor Samuel Huston and received 
a most excellent training which has well fitted him for his 
profession. Judge Piety of the circuit court appointed 
Mr. Whitaker to the position of probate judge in 1903. 

The probate judge is a repubUcan and does not care who 
knows it. He enjoys hunting and fishing and there is 
nothing that pleases him better in the way of sports than 
base ball. In his boyhood days he was quite an amateur 
ball player and at Ann Arbor was on the 'Varsity team. 



GEORGE E. FARRINGTON 



UNDOUBTEDLY much of the popularity of the Van- 
daHa Railroad in Terre Haute and elsewhere, for 
that matter, is due to the men in its different de- 
partments who have been long in the service and whom 
we could not possibly associate in any other capacity. 
Wouldn't the downtown office of the Vandaha look rather 
queer if we should not see Mr. Farrington there? He has 
been with the Vandaha thirty-eight years. He has seen 
the road develop from a single division into a large system 
and has sold Vandalia tickets to several generations of 
Terre Hauteans — and he's a young man yet. 

Mr. Farrington was born in Terre Haute in 1840. As a 
boy he attended the private school of Rev, Welton M 
Modesitt, and was a pupil in the old Seminary, He grad- 
uated from Kenyon college, Gambler, Ohio, in 1862, and 
had no sooner returned to Terre Haute than he enlisted in 
the Eighty-Fifth Indiana Regiment, to go to the front. 
He was mustered out of the army in June, 1865. Then 
began his railroad career. He first went into the office of 
President Peck of the Terre Haute & Richmond road, and 
was there but a short time until he resigned to accc])t a 
position in the wholesale grocery house of Strong & Coin- 
])any. How-ever, he had caught the railroad fever and 
next accepted a position with the Terre Haute & Indian- 
apolis Railroad. He was a valuable man in the office of 
the president and treasurer and in those early days had to 
be very versatile. Often he was called upon to bill freight, 
run extra trains, sell tickets or occasionally do a little 
loading. He became secretary of the Terre Haute and 
Indianapolis railroad company and held that office until 
the Vandalia lines were merged with the Pennsy system 
in 1905. From his first days with the \'andaha, Mr. Far- 
rington has acted as general agent in Terre Haute, and he 
has seen the road develop into one of the best in the 
country. 

Just once Mr, Farrington was in ]X)litics, He was 
republican councilman from the Second ward from 1880 
until 1882. He is a member of all of the Masonic bodies, 
the Grand Army of the Republic, and the Loyal Legion 










FRED B. JONES 



VV^HEN Company No. 83, Uniform Rank, Knights of 
' ' Pythias, needs some one to hustle around and 
arrange a little social function, there is always one, 
who, in the common vernacular, is "Johnny on the spot." 
That personage is Fred B. Jones, who would go without 
his meals to contribute to the success of anything in the 
social line gotten up by Company No. 83. Even his best 
friends admit that he enjoys dancing; in fact, it is said he 
"could just die waltzing." But then, all work and no 
play makes Jack a dull boy, and a few organizations need 
just such a hustler. 

To look at him, you would not sujipose tliat Mr. Jones 
was a fire eating Kentuckian. On the other hand he is a 
very mild sort, who has friends by the hundreds and finds 
time to be sociable with all of them. In Meade county, 
at Big Spring, on the twenty-seventh day of April, 1871, 
Fred Jones was born. He hved at Big Spring just two 
years and his desire to see the world even at that tender 
age was gratified, for his parents removed to Louisville 
where he received his first instruction in the graded schools, 
Mr. Jones left the parental roof very early and has seen 
about everything worth seeing in the United States, 

He finally struck Terre Haute in the course of his travels 
and concluded to remain here. As manager of the bottling 
department of the Terre Haute Brewing Com])any he 
occupies a very responsible place and superintends a large 
force of men who are kept busy corking up the beverage 
that is making Terre Haute famous, Mr. Jones is a mem- 
ber of Social Lodge Free and Accepted Masons, and of 
Paul Revere Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. For six 
years he was the recorder of Company No. 83, Uniform 
Rank, Knights of Pythias, and has always taken a great 
interest in the welfare of the uniform rank, especially of 
No. 83. 



BEN A. GOLDMAN 



f N this picture we have Mr. Goldman showing a customer 
a chair. He does not want to have a customer's way 
in his store rocky, so he does not hesitate to show easy 
chairs. He has high chairs for short people and low chairs 
for high people. Incidentally, he has numerous other 
useful articles that add comfort, elegance and even luxury 
to a home. 

Perhaps you have noticed the new red front lietween 
Fourth and Fifth streets on the north side of Wabash 
avenue. Vou have certainly heard it, even if you have 
not seen it, Ben Goldman is a believer in printers' ink 
and red paint as well. He sent to New York to get a 
brand of paint that would shine brighter and wear longer 
than the paint on any other store front on Wabash avenue. 

Baltimore, Maryland, is the native city of Mr. Goldman. 
After graduating from the high school and later taking a 
course in a commercial C(jllege he w^ent straight into the 
furniture and carpet business, where he has remained ever 
since.. He is one of the most valued men conected with 
the Reliable Furniture and Carpet Company, which o])er- 
ates stores in a number of cities. 

The local store was opened by Mr. Goldman in 1901 and 
has been successful in every sense of the word. Mr. 
Goldman is manager and treasurer of the company here 
and only recently opened another store of a similar kind 
at Memphis, Tennessee. 

Mr. Goldman is a member of the Elks lodge No. 7, of 
the city of Baltimore, and is a frequent visitor at the rooms 
of the local lodge. He finds his greatest pleasure in fish- 
ing, and on his visits home never fails to enjoy an outing 
on Chesapeake Bay, if the season for such sport is on. 





ALVIN W. DUDLEY 



f IFE is a series of charges and the soldier is not alone 
in the charging. Repeated charges and onslaughts 
are made daily on the baker, the butcher, the grocer 
and the laundryman and even the hardware men and the 
tinner are compelled to charge once in a while. Here we 
have Captain Dudley of Company B, I. N. G., who is about 
to charge, but not on the field of battle. 

Captain Dudley is a Terre Hautean from start to finish. 
He began very early in life to make his own way. For a 
time he thought he would be a lawyer, and while working 
in a law office studied Blackstone, and at night attended 
business college. However, his health was such that he 
was obliged to have outdoor employment, so he learned 
the tinners' trade. He went into business for himself on 
East Wabash avenue in 1898, and in addition to doing a 
large tinners' business, he had a well stocked store of hard- 
ware, stoves and furnaces. Mr. Dudley was honored by 
the republican party by being elected a member of the 
sixty-second general assembly. He was the author of the 
prison matron bill and introduced the bill providing pay 
ffir members of the Indiana guard when at target practice 
drills, etc., giving it regulations similar to the United 
States army. For a short time he was deputy oil inspector 
being appointed by Governor Durbin, but resigned after 
six months to attend to his private business. He enlisted 
as a private in the state guard in 1890 and has filled every 
cimipany position, non-commissioned and commissioned. 
He received his captaincy in 1903. He was in Camp Alger 
and Camp Meade during the Spanish-American war and 
has a great love for miUtary duty. He is a member of 
Fort Harrison lodge of Odd Fellows and of Occidental 
lodge, Knights of Pythias. 



HENRY E. VANNIER 



T 7'ERSATILITY is a characteristic of the American. 

' Henry E. Vannier, whom we see here in the act of 

placing a roll of roofing on the building, early in life 

intended to be a maker of fine gloves. However, fickle 

fortune changed his plans. 

Mr. Vannier was born in Dover, Xew Jersey, the state 
that furnishes the jokesmith a great many opportunities 
for the exercise of his wit. While yet a small boy Mr. 
Vannier's parents moved to Brooklyn where his father 
became an importer of fine gloves, laces, etc. At eleven 
years of age the \'annier children were sent to Europe 
to be educated. Mr. ^'annier studied in the Alschuler at 
Darmstadt, Hessen, Germany, for three years, and from 
there went to Geneva where he entered the Moravian 
Institute. He was in France nearly a year and then 
accepted a position in one of the famous glove manufac- 
tories of Chaumont. He was given an excellent oppor- 
tunity to learn the business, but the death of his father 
caused his return home. 

From 1882 until 1887 Mr. Vannier managed a ranch in 
North Dakota, later he was interested in the timber busi- 
ness and traveled for several years in the south. His 
experience in the roofing and supply business dates from 
the time he began as a salesman for roofing supplies, rep- 
resenting the Keystone Roofing Sand Supply Company, 
of Dubuque. He was instrumental in establishing an 
agency here, and bought out the company's interest in 
Terre Haute in 1904. 

Mr. Vannier enjoys hunting and fishing and never over- 
looks an opportunity to indulge in these sports. He is an 
active member of the Commercial Club and the Young 
Business Men's Club. For several years he has also been 
a member of the National Association of Master Composi- 
tion Roofers. 





WILSON NAYLOR COX 



■\ Jo wonder that Terre Haute is not engaged in more 
strife and turmoil than it is. In this city of sixty 
thousand jieople we have, according to the most 
recent directory, in the neighborhood of one dundred 
lawyers, learned followers of Blackstone. Of course, it 
is the chief effort of these men to preach continuously the 
doctrine of brotherly love, wherein we should all dwell 
together without getting huffy at every little thing that 
happens. Occasionally, our natural meanness breaks out, 
and then the ever faithful expounder of the law rushes in 
to fix up the breach. But he always does his best to avoid 
this latter calamity by the application of preventive rem- 
edies. Mr. Cox is one of our peace commissioners. 

He is a native Terre Hautean and a graduate of the high 
school. In pursuing his education farther he spent two 
years at Exeter College in New Hampshire and then 
entered Columbia University in 1897, graduating in 1900 
with the degree of h. L. H. Mr. Cox opened an office for 
himself in the Naylor-Cox liuilding and gives much of his 
time and attention to the affairs of the Cox estate. 

Nearly every man has a fad and Mr. Cox has one in 
which he indulges frequently. He is a great lover of 
hunting and nearly every season spends some time in 
Louisiana shooting deer. To get careless of gain and 
breathe brand new air, or to appease an irritated liver and 
straighten out a torpid lung there is nothing like a trip to 
the woods of the north or the soutli. To hunt is to change 
the whole program of life for a short time and hence Mr. 
Cox is a great devotee of the sport. He enjoys golf and 
plays frequently on the links of the Country Club. He is 
a member of the local lodge of Klks and is also a member 
of the Young Business Men's Club. 



WILLIAM B. HICE 



t f ERE we find Mr. Hice making a speech. He lias the 
^ ^ law on the subject and is getting to the point. It 
ought to be perfectly clear, in view of the facts pre- 
sented, that Mr. Hice is right. The picture would indicate 
that he is certain the jury thinks his way. However, no 
lawyer ever felt certain about a jury, especially the lawyers 
of Terre Haute, for some of the Vigo county juries have 
been responsible for some very funny things. Any news- 
paper man can tell you that. 

Terre Haute's deputy city attorney is a product of 
Harrison county. At three years of age he induced his 
parents to move to New Albany where educational ad- 
vantages were of the superior kind. He did not care to 
serve an apprenticeship husking corn, pulling mustard out 
of flax and driving the hogs to market. He had his eyes 
set on the law and trained in tliat direction. Graduating 
from the New Albany high school, Mr. Hice attended the 
private school of Professor Chenault, in T^ouisville, for one 
year. Then he set out for the University of Michigan, 
where he listened to lectures by Jerry Knowlton and other 
Ann Arbor celebrities for three years. He was graduated 
from the law department in 1898. Returning to New- 
Albany he entered the office of Judge I'tz, then prosecutor 
of Harrison county. 

In the spring of 1899 Mr. Hice located in Terre Haute 
and began the practice of law. He is an active republican 
and was appointed deputy city attorney by Mayor Bida- 
man in 1904. As a member of the Thompson Club he has 
been quite active. When the Young Business Men's Club 
was organized Mr. Hice was one of the first members. 
He is Junior Warden of Masonic Lodge No. 19, and is also 
a Maccabee and a member of the Blinn Camp, Sons of 
Veterans. 





^J c\ 



ALBERT L. PFAU 



A LBERT L. PFAU arrived in Cincinnati without a 
stitch to his back about the time of the assassina- 
tion of Abraham Lincoln. His mother was a great 
admirer of the martyred president, hence the " L" which 
stands for Lincoln. He had a narrow escape from being 
called Abraham Lincoln Pfau, Ijut a compromise was 
effected. Mr. Pfau was graduated from the Woodward 
high school in the Queen City. 

At eighteen years of age he entered into the glue and 
sandpaper business and as a consequence was badly stuck. 
He decided to get into something more breakable and chose 
the glass business. When he was twenty-one he organized 
the North Baltimore Glass Company, associating himself 
with Col. Isaiah W. Richardson, of Covington, Kentucky. 
The factory was built at North Baltimore, Ohio, at the 
time oil and gas were discovered in that locality. When 
the supply of natural fuel diminished, the factory was 
removed to Albany, Indiana. On account of the superior 
advantages of Terre Haute the North Baltimore Glass 
Company was established here in 1900. This was one of 
the first substantial industries moving to Terre Haute 
from the Indiana gas belt. Beer and soda bottles are 
manufactured and the firm has tripled its capacity since 
coming to Terre Haute. Mr. Pfau is president and treas- 
urer, Mr. I. W. Richardson, Jr., secretary, and D. C. 
Richardson, manager of the local plant. 

Mr. Pfau is a great lover of horseback riding, and in good 
weather enjoys nothing better than taking this kind of 
exercise. He acquired the art of riding while a student 
at Woodward high school and has never been without a 
good mount since that time. Tlje Pfau home in Collett 
Park place is one of the most beautiful in the city. 



WILLIAM L. M'PEAK 



BILL XYE in one of his short stories tells of a conversa- 
tion he had with a restaurant man who conducted 
an eating place at a small junction town in Indiana. 
Nye had smoked a very bad cigar which he had purchased 
of the restaurant man and asked him if he ran the lunch 
counter in as reckless a manner as he did the cigar counter. 
The man had been perfectly frank aliout the cigars and 
admitted they were bad. 

"I do just the same about ray lunch counter," said the 
proprietor. "If a man steps up and wants a fresh sand- 
wich I give it to him if I've got it, and if I haven't I tell 
him so. If you turn my sandwiches over, you will find the 
date of its publication on every one. It's just the same 
with boiled eggs. I have a rubber dating stamp and as 
soon as the eggs are turned over to me by the hen for 
inspection, I date them. Then they are boiled and another 
date in red is stamped on them. If one of my clerks should 
date an egg ahead I would fire him too quick. Of course 
a new cook will sometimes smuggle a late date onto a 
mediaeval egg and sell it, but he has to change his name 
and flee. I try to treat the public right because the ma- 
jority of people who eat are the kind I may meet in a 
future state." 

With due regard for the people whom William McPeak 
feeds each day and the possibility of meeting them again 
in another world, he has always treated them right. The 
McPeak restaurant is a fixed institution and Terre Haute- 
ans have the habit of going there when they want some- 
thing good and fresh to eat. Mr. McPeak is a native of 
Nashville, Tennessee, and came to Terre Haute in 1892. 
He has been in the restaurant business ever since. As a 
caterer he has served a numlier of the most enjoyable 
banquets in the town, and is shown here in the uniform 
of Company No. 83 at one of the popular functions given 
by the company. In addition to being a member of the 
Knights of Pythias, Mr. McPeak is an Elk. 





CHARLES EMORY DAVIS 



IF there is a more familiar face, or a more genial one, 
•^ about the court house than that which belongs to 
Charles Emory Davis, we would like to know who 
owns it. It is the biggest wonder in the world that Mr. 
Davis is not one of the most adroit politicians in the state, 
but he believes in the office seeking the man. 

Linton township is the birthplace of Mr. Davis. Strange 
to say he is a republican. Nearly every other man in 
Linton township is a democrat. The democracy in Linton 
township is as firm as the eternal hills and Mr. Davis found 
this to be a fact when he was nominated for trustee in 
1894 and made the race for the republicans. He was 
beaten by fourteen votes. The usual majority turned up 
by the democrats, however, is about one hundred, so that 
at least a few of the followers of the "great unwashed" 
voted for Mr. Davis, because they couldn't lielp it. 

Born in July, 1855, Mr. Davis worked on a farm and 
went to school until he had learned all that there was to 
learn in that particular locality. Then he began teaching 
others and "kept school" for twenty-two years in the 
same township. The Oregon school was his first and last 
one, although he wielded the birch at several places in the 
township during the time he was in the teaching harness. 
In 1895 Mr. Davis became deputy auditor under Auditor 
James Soules, and was in that office until Mr. Soule's term 
expired. Then, in 190.3, he went into the treasurer's 
office under William Clark as deputy. He has filled the 
position with credit to himself and the county. When the 
new county reform law went into effect in 1899 Mr. Davis 
discharged his new duties in excellent manner thoroughly 
familiarizing himself with the ditTerent duties which 
devolved upon him. 

Mr. Davis belongs to lodge No. 51 of the Odd Fellows, 
lodge No. 81 Kniglits of Pythias, Vigo Encampment No. 
17, and is a member of the Jimior Order Llnited American 
Mechanics. 



CHARLES FOX 



How much for it? Lovely seven room cottage for 
sale on easy monthly payments. Doesn't need 
any fixing up. Beautifully located, with trolley 
passing the property. ()nly one hour's ride from city 
hall. Greater Terre Haute will double in value within 
next two years. Finest schools and all the social advan- 
tages of the bigger city. 

If the prediction comes true that the ])opulation of 
Terre Haute will be 100,000 by 1910, then Mr. Fox's 
"ad" will not be a bit out of place. 

Were it not for the hustling real estate men, Terre 
Haute might still be in its infancy. Mr. Fox, as secretary 
of the Phcenix Building and Loan Association is in a 
position to help you build a home if you are tired of paying 
rent. He will sell you a good lot if you haven't got one, 
and after your house is built he will sell you the fire in- 
surance policy to protect it. 

Charles Fox is a native of the city and has been sticking 
close to the old burg ever since 1868. He received his 
education at the public and parochial schools and first 
went into the railroad business, being in the freight office 
of the Evansville & Terre Haute Railroad three years. 
After holding several responsible positions he engaged in 
the real estate and fire insurance business with John 
Gerdink in 1898. In 1904 Mr. Fox engaged in business 
for himself. He is secretary of the Phcenix Building and 
Loan Association and transacts a general real estate and 
fire insurance business. 

As a lover of the great national game he is a director 
of the Terre Haute Baseball Association and also a member 
of the Terre Haute Trotting Association. At present he 
is treasurer of the Knights of Columbus Coimcil. a member 
of the Young Men's Institute and of Panl Revere Lodge 
Knighst of Pythias. As a believer in the future of the 
city, he is active in both the Commercial Club and the 
Young Business Men's Club. 





ISAIAH W. RICHARDSON. JR. 



ISAIAH W. RICHARDSON, JR., the secretary of the 
■'■ North Baltimore Glass Comyany, was born to the 
business, for his father before him was one of the best 
known bottle manufacturers in the country. There is a 
peculiar fascination about the making of glass and the 
man who engages in it rarely ever leaves it. 

Mr. Richardson began at the bottom of the ladder and 
is a practical glass manufacturer in every sense of the 
word. He has "carried in" bottles from the moulds to 
the tempering lehrs as a boy, and knows each department 
thoroughly. 

Mr. Richardson was born in Covington, Kentucky, 
sometimes called the "Spotless Town" principally be- 
cause it was the hot bed of some very wary and unscrupu- 
lous politicians for a number of years. Graduating from 
the Covington high school, Mr. Richardson made his first 
business venture. He was a vinegar dealer for a time and 
then took a position in the claim department of the Queen 
& Crescent Railway offices in Cincinnati. He resigned his 
position with the Queen & Crescent in 1887, to go with 
the North Baltimore Glass Company which had estabhshed 
a factory at North Baltimore, Ohio. From the latter 
place the factory was moved to Albany, Indiana. For 
three years he had the practical management of the Albany 
factory and gained a thorough knowledge of the business. 
While a citizen of Albany, Mr. Richardson served very 
acceptably as a member of the school board. 

In 1900 he accompanied his father and Mr. Albert Pfau 
to Terre Haute and upon the death of Mr. Richardson, 
Sr., Ijecame secretary of the local company. 

He is an active member of the Young Business Men's 
Club, a member of the local lodge of Elks, No. 86, and is a 
Mason. He was one of the youngest masters in the 
Masonic order in Ohio. 



HARRY H. ROSEMAN 



/^NCE Mr. Roseman was guilty of turniuj; his back on 
the railroad business to become a rancher in the 
far west. On a bucking bronclio, his belt full of 
pistols and a lariat on his saddle, Mr. Roseman roamed 
the prairies in search of health and cattle. He became 
familiar with the plains of Mexico, Arizona and California, 
and herded sheep in the northwest. The raising of sheep 
is a hobby with Mr. Roseman and next to talking over 
freight rates he would prefer to discuss that subject. 
However, after answering the call of the w-ild, he returned 
to civilization and went back to his first love. 

Mr. Roseman is a native of Vincennes and lived there 
until 1886. He attended Vincennes University and re- 
ceived a most excellent training. He was compelled to 
hustle very early in life and his first positiim was as a 
messenger in the master mechanic's office of the old O. & 
M. railway. After a year at Vincennes he went to Evans- 
ville and took employment with the Evansville & Terre 
Haute, in the freight office. He was promoted every few 
months until he became traveling freight agent. Then 
he went west for a time, returning to his old position. In 
1894 Mr. Roseman went into the receiver's office of the 
Evansville & Richmond road and in 1895 was made general 
freight and passenger agent. In 1897 the road was pur- 
chased by Mr. John Walsh and Mr. Roseman was con- 
tinued in that position after the organization of the South- 
ern Indiana Railroad. Mr. Roseman but recently resigned 
to accept the position of manager of the freight depart- 
ment of the Cairo division of the Big Four. In the future 
he will have his headquarters at Danville, Ilhnois. Mr. 
Roseman made a host of friends in Terre Haute who regret 
his departure. 





WILLIAM H. ALBRECHT, JR. 



"Tu be or not to be" — in business — 
Resolves itself thuswise: 

A simple question of whether 
You will or won't advertise. 

MR. ALBRECHT, JR., has studied the question of 
advertising in a very thorough manner. We see 
him looking over a stock of silks preparatory to 
springing a surprise on the shoppers tomorrow. He no 
doubt has in mind a number of bargains, and if he has a 
weakness for having the Albrecht store excel in any one 
thing, it is in good silks. 

As general manager of the Albrecht store, Mr. Albrecht 
gives considerable attention to the advertising end of the 
business and prepares the "copy" for the daily papers. 
This in itself requires experience and a special fitness. 

Mr. Albrecht was born in Terre Haute in 1882. He 
received his education in the public schools, at Culver 
Military Academy and Columbian University, Washington, 
D. C. He took special work in chemistry, physics and 
mathematics at Coluniliia I'niversity and has a well de- 
veloped love for the sciences, especially electricity. Fol- 
lowing his college work he took an extensive trip through 
the southwestern states and Mexico, and then went into 
the dry goods business with his father, W. H. Albrecht, Sr. 

Mr. Albrecht has taken up the study of silks, making 
this department a feature, and is interested in the manu- 
facture of silks, having a branch office at 91 Greene street. 
New York City. He has utilized his knowledeg of elec- 
tricity to good advantage and only recently organized 
the Prismatic Electric Company, which does a large local 
business. He is an active member of the Young Business 
Men's Club and is one of its directors. He is also a mem- 
ber of the local lodge of Elks and is a member of the New- 
York Athletic Club. 



NED S. KIDDER 



IF the man pictured here were monarch of all he surveyed 
he would be much more important than the Sultan 
of Sulu or the King of Siam. As it is, Ned S. Kidder 
can give everybody in Terre Haute a straight tip. He 
was never burned at the stake, but he swears by the stake. 
He has lines in all parts of the city, but does not drive a 
horse. To be frank with you, he rides a wheel. Mr. 
Kidder is needed in so many parts of the city in a single 
day that he has found the bicycle almost indispensable. 

Mr. Kidder is a Michigander by birth, his native town 
being Quincy. He followed his parents to Terre Haute 
when a very small boy and has been here ever since. He 
graduated from the high school in 1892. This was the 
first midwinter graduating class that ever left the high 
school. To round out his education and prepare himself 
for the city engineer's office, Mr. Kidder attended the 
Normal school one year and then entered the Polytechnic 
graduating in 1898. Before becoming city engineer in 
1904 he was associated with his brother, A. D. Kidder, 
in making government surveys in the northwest. Since 
he entered the city engineer's office Mr. Kidder has been 
kept pretty busy preparing plans for various improve- 
ments and inspecting the work already done. 

The numbers on the card that Mr. Kidder is holding to 
view probably refer to yards, feet and inches. As he is a 
great lover of wheeling, Mr. Kidder indulges this hobby 
very profitably in his business. Any manly, vigorous 
sport is enjoyed by the city engineer. 





NORMAN BINDLEY 



nPHOSE who have chafed at the restraint put upun them 
•*■ by the board of safety here, can see one of the mem- 
bers of the board sitting on the "Hd" of the town. 
Even some of the older inhabitants have difficulty in re- 
membering when the "lid" was on any tighter than it is 
at present. Mr. Bindley is the democratic member of the 
board that gives instructions to policemen and listens to 
the voice of the people. After all, as Mr. Bindley will tell 
you, the people have a great deal to do with the regula- 
tion of the "lid." 

Sitting on the "lid" is not .Mr. Bindley's hol)l)y. He is 
the one member uf the board who is especially interested 
in the city of Terre Haute having a creditable fire depart- 
ment, one that will lower the insurance rates and be as 
efficient as any in the country. As a small boy, Mr. 
Bindley enjoyed seeing the dejiartnient make a run, 
though he never pulled a fire box just for the fun of the 
thing. When he was ap])ointed a member of the board 
by Mayor Bidaman in 1904 he gave his first attention to 
the fire department, and as a consequence its efficiency 
has been greatly increased and the discipline the best in 
recent years. Throughout, he has had the hearty co- 
operation of Chief Leonard. 

Mr. Bindley was born in Terre Haute in 1871. After 
leaving the public schools he went into the wholesale drug 
house of the E. H. Bindley Company. To better prepare 
himself for the business he spent two years at the Illinois 
School of Pharmacy. He was sixteen years of age when 
he finished his course and too young to graduate. He was 
in the drug business nine years, most of that time doing 
laboratory work. He decided on a change of occupation 
after being in the drug business for several years and at- 
tended Kent College of Law in Chicago, graduating in 
1897. He is a great lover of baseball. 



CHARLES G. PUGH 



DICYCLE — A form of velocipede or lightly-built wheeled 
•L* vehicle, propelled by the person who occupies it. 
The bicycle, as its name {bis, twice, and Gleek kylos, 
wheel) imports, has but two wheels, and as these are placed 
in line, one behind the other, the machine acquires and 
maintains its stabihty in the erect position only in motion. 
The front wheel of a bicycle used to be about seven times 
as large as the one behind. We have reproduced one of 
the old type to give the rising generation some idea of 
the kind of wheels upon which their fathers used to risk 
their lives. Mr. Pugh rode one of the first Enghsh made 
bicycles, and looked just about as you see him in the pic- 
ture. There was nothing so much dreaded in the early 
days by the high wheel riders as rocks. 

Mr. Pugh was born on a farm in Harrison township, 
April 30, 1865. He was seventeen years of age when he 
came to Terre Haute and learned the printer's trade in 
the office of the old Banner. He formed a partnership in 
1887 with William Rottman in the printing business and 
it w'as but a short time afterward until the firm began 
selling the old-fashioned high wheels as a side-line. The 
wheel trade was so flourishing that Messrs. Rottman and 
Pugh sold out their printing establishment and engaged 
in the sale of wheels alone. It was in 1899 that they sold 
their first safety of the modern type. In 1903 Mr. Pugh 
bought out Mr. Rottman and has been engaged in the 
bicycle and repair business alone since that time. 

"The Wabash" is built especially for Mr. Pugh. The 
D. and J. hanger and the Thor hub are used in its con- 
struction and the wheel has met with great favor. Other 
well known wheels, such as the Cleveland, Pierce and Im- 
perial are handled. 

Mr. Pugh belongs to No. 3, Uniform Rank of the Knights 
of Pythias, and is a member of several other organizations. 
He would rather take his minnow bucket and go fishing 
than to indulge any other kind of sport. 





JOHN H. CHEEK 



/^NE strange thing about a dentist is that he's happiest 
when he's looking down in the mouth. It's because 
he earns his hving that way. 

Dr. Cheek is a painless dentist; it doesn't hurt him a bit 
to put a fine edge on your incisors, to fix your canines so 
they won't wabble, fill a few cavities in your bicuspids or 
place a shining crown on your molars. This faculty of 
resisting discomfort has come through years of practice. 
After all, the man who sits down in a dentist's chair feeling 
that it's all over now and wondering if it would not have 
been better to have dictated his will before taking this 
important — perhaps final — step, has already passed 
through nine-tenths of the trouble that really comes to 
him. 

Dr. Cheek was born near Seelyville, in October, 1876. 
We will give the doctor credit for having hustled pretty 
hard ever since he was a youngster. He liad no more than 
received the elements of a common school education until 
he was off to Indianapolis, where he attended the Indian- 
apolis Business University. He next took a course of one 
year in the Indiana Post-Graduate School of Prosthetic 
Dentistry, graduating in 1897. He immediately entered 
the dental department of Indianapolis University and se- 
cured his sheepskin from that school in 1899. He prac- 
ticed his profession one year in the Capitol City before 
coming to Terre Haute. His place of business is in the 
Irwin block, where he has a completely equipped suite for 
the practice of his profession. 



GEORGE W. J. HOFFMAN 



"Yy/K can rightly refer to George W. J. Hoffman as the 
Izaak ^Valton of the druggists. He would rather 
fish than fill prescriptions, but realizes that there 
is less in the fishing industry than the drug business. How- 
ever, he indulges his hobby sufficiently to lay in a good 
stock of fish stories every season. He finds splendid bass 
fishing each year at Lake Maxinkuckee, and goes oftener 
to Greenfield Bayou. 

Just before the close of the civil war Mr. Hoffman was 
born in Terre Haute. As a boy he attended the public 
schools, attended commercial college and then entered the 
Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. In March, 1886, he 
received his diploma and returned to Terre Haute to take 
up the business for which he had been especially trained. 
He first accepted a clerkship in the store of Gulick & Berry 
and after a few years became a memlier of the firm of 
Gulick & Company. He succeeded Mr. Gulick as owner 
of the drug store which is now the HotTman drug store at 
Fourth street and Wabash avenue. 

Mr. Hoffman established the Central Pharmacy at Sixth 
street and Wabash avenue in October, 1900. 

Aside from giving people bitter doses to swallow, Mr 
Hoffman has a smile and a handshake for them which has 
had something to ho with his popularity and success in 
business. 

Mr. Hoffman is a member of the \'igo County Retail 
Druggists' Association, the Commercial Club and the 
Young Business Men's Club. 





GEORGE J. RIEHM 



TVT'HENEVER Mr. Riehm suits a man he gets a fit. 
That is to say his customer gets a fit. 

At any rate we know that Mr. Riehm is practical 
from the start in the tailoring business and holds to the 
opinion that good dressing pays. Good clothes, according 
to Mr. Riehm, cost less in the long run as a mere matter 
of outlay than the other kind, and the advantages they 
bring are not to Ije counted. Ask yourself whether you 
would prefer to do business with a man who is neatly 
dressed or with a man garbed with utter disregard of taste 
and neatness. Getting your clothes made by a good tailor 
is a species of extravagance that pays the wearer. We 
believe it was Will Shakespeare who said something about 
clothes not making the man, but that man looked much 
better when he was well dressed. If it wasn't Shakcs])eare 
it was some one else just as w-ise. 

Mr. Riehm is a native of Jennings county, Indiana, and 
was born there in 1871, in the town of North Vernon. He 
moved, when lie was quite young, to Seymour, wlierc he 
learned the tailoring business. For some time lie con- 
ducted a tailoring establishment in Seymour, and located 
in Terre Haute in 1902 in the Swope block. He is a maker 
of clothing for particular people and the work turned out 
is high class in every respect. Skillful tailors are em- 
ployed and the best of domestic and iinjiorted cloths are 
purchased. 

Since coming to Terre Haute Mr. Rielim has made a 
large number of friends and has built up a splendid busi- 
ness. He is a member of the Knights of Columbus, the 
Elks lodge No. 541 at Seymour and is also a menilier of 
the Wabash Cycling Club. 



ROBERT H. CATLIN 



TV^E will agree with the orator that the flag which floats 
over the surging mass of humanity seen in the pic- 
ture is the most beautiful banner that was ever 
carried into the Philippines, or anywhere else for that 
matter. Under its starry folds the Filipino or any other 
"pino" can be assured of protection and all of the benefits 
of civihzation just as long as he respects it. If Mr. Catlin 
is anything, he is patriotic. In the two thousand or more 
speeches that he has made on various occasions he has 
kept the flag and what it represents well in view. 

Mr. Catlin is a real Hoosier. He was born on a farm in 
Parke county, in 1856. He attended Bloomingdale Acad- 
emy and Asburj' University, now DePauw, and was teach- 
ing school when he was eighteen years of age. He handled 
the birch in Sullivan and Putnam counties. He studied 
law in the office of Judge White at Rockville and began 
the practice of his profession there. It was in 1880 that 
Mr. Catlin came to Terre Haute and opened his office in 
the rooms which were once occupied by Daniel \'oorhees, 
Judge Crane and other well-known member of the legal 
profession. 

As a republican, Mr. Catlin is one of the staunchest. He 
has been in great demand during the big campaigns and 
in 1900 did much to save Nebraska for the republicans. 
While busy making speeches out in Mr. Bryan's state, he 
was wired to come and help save Indiana. Mr. Catlin 
arrived in time to do the work. Mr. Catlin has never held 
a public office. His greatest hobby is his home. He is a 
member of the Beta Theta Pi college fraternity, the Masons 
and the Modern Woodmen. 





JAMES E. MILKS 



A NY man is a great benefactor of the human family who 
^ ^ does something to alleviate its many ills. For years 
and years James E. Milks believed that if crude 
petroleum could be made into a palatable form it would be 
inestimable in value to those suffering from asthma, con- 
sumption, catarrh and stomach trouble. He had observed 
that years ago the Seneca Indians of Pennsylvania and 
New York State had used the crude petroleum for these 
ills and that fine results followed. For years he experi- 
mented with oils and has at last produced a remedy that 
will positively cure all the diseases mentioned. The great 
White Plague — consumption — is curable through the use 
of Milks' Emulsion, and this has been demonstrated by 
Mr. Milks, who has cured thirty consumptives in Terre 
Haute within the past year. However, the directions 
given by Mr. Milks were carried out by the sick people to 
the letter, and they are living testimonials to the wonderful 
curative powers of the emulsion. 

Mr. Milks is a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania. He 
lived on a farm until he was twenty-one years of age. He 
was graduated from the Albion high school and the Penn- 
sylvania State Normal School at Edinboro. At seventeen 
he was teaching school. After quitting the teaching pro- 
fession he was a traveling salesman, held responsible 
positions with the Nickle Plate and Erie railroads and 
went into the oil refining business in Cleveland, Ohio. 
Later he moved to Indianapolis where he represented one 
of the biggest independent oil refining firms in the country. 
When this firm was absorbed by the Standard, Mr. Milks 
came to Terre Haute and organized the Tiona Oil Com- 
pany. He formed the Milks Emulsion Company in 1903, 
local people owning the stock. A great volume of business 
has been done by the company and its prospects are un- 
usually bright. The emulsion placed on the market 
practically sells itself, which is its best testimonial. 



JOHN E. COX 



<< A WKWARD squad, attention! Shoulder arms! Right 



y-v 



by fours, forward march!" But the squad does 



squad" as "Captain" John E. Cox will testify. He 
has had more military honors conferred upon him by the 
members of Company 3, Uniform Rank, Knights of 
Pythias, thah most men get in a lifetime, but he has 
borne this glory without any swelling of the head. 

"Captain" Cox was five years of age when he left the 
farm on which he was born in Nevins township, and came 
to Terre Haute. He attended school regularly, did not 
play "hookey" and was eventually graduated from the 
high school in the class of 1886. He was instrumental in 
organizing the High School Alumni Association and was 
its first president. He was graduated from the law de- 
partment of DePauw University in 1889 and started into 
the practice of law here in the office of I. N. Pierce. Two 
years later he bought the office of H. D. Roquet and in 
1893 formed a partnership with Attorney Ora D. Davis. 
Mr. Cox has given considerable attention to the laws relat- 
ing to building and loan business and estates, confining 
himself almost entirely to commercial law. He is a demo- 
crat and was of the seven men who organized the Jackson 
club. He was a candidate for superior court judge in 
1902 and was defeated by only 84 votes, which was very 
much to his credit. But this defeat did not sour the cap- 
tain of the awkward squad, and he is just the same genial 
attorney as of old. Perhaps the greatest distinction that 
he has is gained from his military record which is fully 
known to every Pythian in the town. 

As a democrat, his loyalty has never been questioned, 
and he did effective work for his party as county chairman 
in 1902. 





JOHN A. DAILEY 



IV yiR. DAILEY is another example of the country boy 
i-^ i- who has migrated to the city and made a success 
of himself. If there is anyone in Terre Haute who 
appreciates the country more than Mr. Dailey we do not 
know who he is. As a training place for the boy Mr. 
Dailey is of the opinion that the country is ideal. Here 
muscle gets free and active play and character building 
can proceed without the baneful influences of city life. 
Until twenty-four years of age the subject of this sketch 
was engaged in tilling the soil. Then he began the manu- 
facture of drain tile and has been one of the pioneers in 
the development of the clay industry in Vigo county. 

Parke county is Mr. Dailey's birthplace. He resided 
there until he was twelve years of age, his parents then 
moving to a farm six miles east of this city. His first 
business venture was in tlie manufacture of tile, first 
running a plant with the aid of a good strong horse in the 
vicinity of his home. Next he established a tile mill at 
Riley which he operated until it was destroyed by fire in 
1892. Following this piece of bad luck Mr. Dailey came 
to Terre Haute and went into the oflice of D. E. Power, 
who at that time was secretary of the Terre Haute Home 
and Savings Association. Upon the death of Mr. Power 
in 1894, Mr. Dailey became secretary of the Association. 
He has continued in the real estate, fire insurance and 
building and loan business ever since. 

Four years ago Mr. Dailey organized the Vigo Clay 
Company, which manufactures hollow building blocks, 
fire proofing and tile of various kinds. The plant is one 
of the most modern in the country and its products are 
shipped to all parts of the United States. Mr. Dailey is 
secretary and treasurer of the company. 

Mr. Dailey is a member of the Uniform Rank, Knights 
of Pythias, Company No. 3. He is a great lover of home 
and that is his greatest hobby. 



RUTHERFORD N. FILBECK 



TT pays to be good. When Rutherford N. Filbeck was a 
■*■ young lad he somehow got a notion in his head that it 
wasn't a good thing to tell whoppers and steal. While 
other boys ran away to go fishing or swimming in the 
Wabash, he took home his reward of merit card. When 
the other boys climbed fences into orchards to pick up 
worm-stung and windfall fruit young "Nick" remained 
in the highway and looked wistful. When his folks had 
company in the parlor he would never creej) into the 
pantry to try the steaming hot friedcakes that had been 
placed there to cool, although he would rivet a longing 
look upon them. And what has been the result? 

Here we present a very good picture of Mr. Filbeck 
scanning a balance at the close of business in the Terre 
Haute Savings Bank. There is a slight discrepancy in the 
figures but this will be discovered before the bank teller 
studies any great length of time. Mr. Filbeck has been 
in the savings bank ever since he left the high school, 
starting in as assistant bookkeeper. He attended to busi- 
ness pretty well and was promoted to his present respon- 
sible position. He doesn't bother so much with the 
figures now but spends more time learning the thousand 
and one signatures of people who do business with the 
banks. Signatures and names become even more familiar 
to the bank teller than faces do. The Terre Haute Sav- 
ings Bank is all that its name implies and is one of the 
best known financial institutions in the city. It is con- 
ducted for the benefit of its depositors, and its board of 
trustees are among the best known men of Terre Haute. 

Mr. Filbeck is purely a Terre Haute product, having 
been born here in 1877. He is a member of the Elks, 
Paul Revere lodge of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Wabash Cycling Club. Just recently he joined the ranks 
of the Benedicts. 





DANIEL N. DAVIS 



T\y making slight ctianges in one of the topical songs of 
the day "Dan" Davis has come into possession of 
another song, "The Good Old Winter Time," one 
with which the public is very familiar. The song har- 
monizes very well with Mr. Davis' business. We have 
heard him in songs more cheering, though anything relat- 
ing to coal is always of vital interest to the consumer, 
especially when there is a scarcity of the product and prices 
soar in an upward direciton. 

We can account for Mr. Davis' sweet tenor voice when 
we learn that he is a Welchman. It was just at the close 
of the civil war that Mr. Davis landed here and made his 
way with his parents to Youngstown, Ohio, where his 
father was engaged in the rolling mill business. A little 
later the Davis family moved to Terre Haute and Terre 
Haute has been glad ever since, for then our musical pop- 
ulation was added to, in quality and quantity consider- 
ably. Mr. Davis attended a commercial college here and 
his first position was in the old Clippinger grocery at 
Seventh street and Wabash avenue. In 1874 Mr. Davis 
became bookkeeper for the Wabash rolling mill and re- 
mained in that position until the mill was absorbed Ijy 
the trust. Then he was auditor for the new company 
until the local plant was abandoned in 1900. He engaged 
in the coal business in the same year. 

As a singer Mr. Davis has taken a prominent part in 
all of the oratorios and other musical events that have 
been given in Terre Haute for the past thirty years. He 
has done nmch church work and is now a member of the 
Centenary choir. 



LOUIS E. WEINSTEIN 



■ I 'HE tailor may make the man, but the haberdasher 
puts on the trimmings which make him a welcome 
member of society. Mr. Weinstein is engaged in the 
pleasant occupation of making the men of Terre Haute 
look a whole lot handsomer than they would otherwise 
a])pear. Who knows but that some of those handsome 
ties decorating the bosoms of his customers were the 
attractions which have led to happy matrimonial alliances? 
A girl doesn't like a sloppily attired man, and it's right 
there that Mr. Weinstein hurries to his relief with all that's 
necessary to make up the deficiency. Just so, too, the 
ill-clad applicant for a position is judged by his appearance 
and many a competent man has lost out because he forgot 
to throw his old hat away and get a new one in its place, 
or to discard his 1895 style collar and tie and supplant 
them with something up-to-date. This wise generation 
reads a man's character even in the socks he wears and 
in the shirt which enwraps his form. Of course the wise 
generation is often mistaken, but it reads it just the same. 
Mr. Weinstein is a Sucker by birth but left his native 
town of Beraent, Illinois, and come to Terre Haute when 
he was six years of age. He was so anxious to get busy 
that he did not wait for a diploma from the high school, 
but went to work very early assisting his brother in the 
cigar business at the Terre Haute house. In September, 
1903, Mr. Weinstein and his brother, Romeo Weinstein, 
purchased the store which they now conduct on Wabash 
avenue, the former attending to its management. The 
firm has made a specialty of catering to particular people 
and men's furnishings exclusively are handled. Mr. 
Weinstein is a member of the Young Business Men's Club 
and is well known socially. 





CHARLES S. DAVIS 



AV/ERE it not for the coal and ice men the funny papers 
' ' would have to go out of business, because the chief 
source of their jokes would have disappeared. If 
one man has shed bitter tears on receiving the proverbially 
fatal coal l)ill, then a thousand have laughed them- 
selves into hysterics over that single incident when 
portrayed in picture and word on the printed page. So, 
you see, we are largely indebted to the coal and ice men 
for much of the jollity and good nature which is spread 
about in this great world. "Weight for the Wagon" 
might be a good motto for Mr. Davis to adopt as we see 
him here, and "The fuel and his inoney are soon parted" 
might be another appropriate one. 

Terre Haute is the native city of Mr. Davis and he has 
stuck by the old town pretty well, though much of his 
time has been spent at college. Mr. Davis was in the high 
school two years before going to DePauw University, 
where he procured a thorough preparatory training for 
Harvard college. He graduated from Harvard college 
in the class of '99, and following that was engaged in 
newspaper work in New York City for nearly two years. 
He had a splendid experience in modern journalism, ac- 
quainting himself with desk work, copy reading and writing 
on the Times, one of the best edited papers in the east. 
For one season he was the yachting editor of that paper 
handling nautical terms and furnishing the New Yorkers 
with the latest news of one of their favorite sports. 

When his father, Mr. Daniel Davis, engaged in the coal 
business in 1900, Mr. Davis returned from the east to 
assist him in the management. At the time the Young 
Business Men's Club was formed Mr. Davis was elected 
secretary of the new organization and did much to estab- 
lish it on a firm basis. 



WILLIAM KING HAMILTON 



IT was back in the nineties that William King Hamilton 
donned the stage attire in which we here see him. For 
one brief season he trod the boards doing parts from 
juvenile to character old man. He was ambitious, had 
talent, and would have made a success on the stage, as his 
friends will admit, but the public was not as appreciative 
as it might have been. He essayed roles in "Hobbies," 
"Confusion" and "A Texas Steer" but he could not live 
on "rolls" alone. It was necessary to appease the inner 
man at times. 

William Hamilton was just two years old when he left 
Chicago. This was immediately following the big fire. 
He came direct to Terre Haute where he has lived ever 
since. He aspired to be a lawyer at one time and for five 
years was a page in the circuit court. But events changed 
the course of his life considerably. For five years he was 
in the office of the county clerk and then he had his theat- 
rical experience. Entering the office of the city clerk in 
1893, he thoroughly familiarized himself with the duties 
of the position and made a race to procure the plum for 
himself in 1898. He was elected by a big majority and 
held the position down for four years, serving the public 
faithfully. 

In 1902 Mr. Hamilton became secretary and treasurer 
of the United States Trust Company, one of the new but 
solid financial institutions of Terre Haute. 1 He is a pop- 
ular member of the Elks lodge and has assisted frequently 
in the giving of amateur entertainments. As a member 
of Euclid lodge of the Masons he had the distinction of 
being the youngest Worshipful Master and Past Master. 
He is also a member of the Knights of Pythias and of the 
Royal Arcanum. ^ ,_, .^j 





AUGUST A. LE TELLIER 



IF August A. LeTellier had his own way all bookkeepers 
w'ould do their work sitting down. However, we do 
not mean to infer that the assistant secretary of the Mer- 
chants Distilling Company is afflicted with "hookworms," 
the new germ that causes laziness and which was recently 
discovered by a Philadelphia doctor. On the other hand, 
all of his friends will agree that there is not a more indus- 
trious citizen in the town. "Hook worms" are probably 
very prevalent in Philadelphia and this may account for 
the town being so slow. The wonder is that the Phila- 
delphia scientist did not find out what was tlie matter with 
his town long before this. 

The distilling interests are something to be reckoned 
with when considering the industries of Terre Haute. The 
business of these concerns is far reaching and during his 
entire residence in Terre Haute Mr. LeTellier has been 
identified with them in some responsible position. Day- 
ton, Ohio, is the birthplace of the subject of this sketch, 
and the year that he happened was 1874. At six months 
of age Mr. LeTellier's parents moved to Shelbyville where 
the young man remained until he was fourteen years of 
age, then coming to Terre Haute. His first position was 
with the Wabash Distilhng Company where he started in 
as an office boy. Within less than a year he was head 
bookkeeper in the office, filling the position made vacant 
by the death of his father, Emil LeTellier. In 1894 Mr. 
LeTellier accepted a position in the office of the Indiana 
Distilling Company where he remained one year, next 
accepting a place in the offices of the Terre Haute Distilhng 
Company. He became connected with the Merchants 
Distilling Company in 1899, and having become interested 
in the business was advanced to his present responsible 
position. He is an Elk, a Knight of Pythias, a member 
of the W'abash Cycling Club and a director of the Young 
Business Men's Association. 



GEORGE G. HOLLOWAY 



MAN passes through seven distinct stages of being 
photographed, each one exceUing all previous efforts 
in that line. This according to a most eminent 
authority on photography. No doubt the photograph 
habit when once formed is a most baneful one, but most 
of the photographers say that the habit has reached that 
point only in a few exceptional cases. The average man 
dreads the photograph gallery worse than he does the 
chair of the dentist and why it is so it is hard to figure out. 
What is more interesting than the family album? Silently 
the old finger-marked book, lying so unostentatiously on 
the centre table, points out the mile-stones from infancy 
to age. The album is an entertainer that has few equals. 
Will you ever forget the time when your first sweetheart 
brought out the allium and proceeded to tell you all about 
her cousins and aunts? Well, we guess not! 

Incidentally, George Holloway will tell you that the 
same old album will convey to you some idea of the pro- 
gress that has been made in photographic art. The pho- 
tographer of former days used to have a wild, hunted look 
about the eyes and a joyless sag about the knees. This 
was caused by the great nerve tension and mental strain 
the result of trying to photograph peo])le. Now, it is 
different. The modern photographer puts a person at his 
ease, has the victim look perfectly natural and while dis- 
cussing the latest musical comedy, snaps the shutter. 
Mr. Holloway began to learn the art of photography just 
as soon as he left school and he has been progressing in 
this Une ever since. For fifteen years he has been pro- 
prietor of the Modern studio. In that time he has won 
a big batch of medals and more silver cups than he can 
conveniently carry at one load. 

In October, 1904, Mr, Holloway was elected president 
of the American Photographers' Association and he has 
also served as president of the Indiana Association and 
the Indiana Art League. He is in demand at the Pho- 
tographers' conventions as a toastmaster and has achieved 
a reputation among the craft in this line. He is secretary 
of the Young Business Men's club and one of its most 
active members. 



^J^ 





WILLIAM J. KINSER 



WILLIAM J. KINSER lias the distinction of being one 
of the first contractors to use an automobile in his 
work of building railroads, parks and canals and 
paving streets. We have just kodaked Mr. Kinser at 
Section 7 of the new Chicago division of the Southern 
Indiana railroad. It is very likely that he has covered 
some forty miles in his machine by dinner time and that 
before the day is over he will have taken a run over to 
Indiana where he has another railroad contract. 

What do you think of a firm here in Terre Haute doing 
a business of nearly three millions of dollars a year and 
making such little noise about it? Perhaps this is the 
reason why the Kinser Construction Company is so suc- 
cessful. William J. Kinser, the treasurer of the company, 
was born in Terre Haute in 1872. After attending high 
school and commercial college he went into the contracting 
business with his father, Thomas W. Kinser. Much atten- 
tion was given to municipal work at the start but the firm 
broadened its operations and there isn't a job in the 
country too big for it now, Mr. T. W. Kinser was in the 
business a good many years before the firm was changed 
to T. W. Kinser & Son, W.J. Kinser coming in as a partner. 
In 1895 it was T. W. Kinser & Sons, Harry L. Kinser be- 
coming a member and in 1903 the company was incor- 
porated under its present name. 

Here are some of the big contracts completed ; Building 
of sewerage and paving systems for Terre Haute and a half 
dozen other cities in Indiana; gun emplacement fortifica- 
tion for the United States government at Portland Harbor, 
Maine; three hundred miles of railway for tlie M. K. & T. 
system in the west; forty miles of the Hennepin canal in 
Illinois; water works at Cambridge, Mass., and now con- 
structing one hundred and fifty miles of the Chicago 
division of the Southern Indiana and seventy miles of the 
Indianapolis division of the same road. The contracts of 
the Southern Indiana road alone amount to two and one- 
half million dollars. 

Mr. Kinser is a member of the Lodge of Elks, the Knights 
of Columbus, and is also a member of the Illinois Athletic 
Club, of Chicago. 



JAMES H. SWANGO 



ATTORNEY SWANGO 'S interest in a pack of hunting 
hounds just over the line in lUinois gave the artist 
a suggestion for his drawing. Mr. Swango has en- 
joyed many a day of hunting with hounds at his old home 
in Kentucky, but the sport is not so greatly enjoyed in 
this particular section as it is in many other parts of the 
country. The sign board sticking in the sand gives an 
inkling of Mr. Swango's interests outside of the practice 
of law. 

From the heart of the Blue Grass region in the good old 
state of Kentucky came Mr. Swango. He was born at 
Mt. SterUng, and there grew up with all that makes Ken- 
tucky famous, blue grass, thoroughbred horses, beautiful 
women and fine tobacco. He lived on a farm until he 
became a young man and has had the exjierience of most 
lawyers — he has taught school. He prepared for the legal 
profession at Center College, Danville, Kentucky. Grad- 
uating from that institution he received the degree of B. A. 
in 1903 and the degree of LL. D. in 1905. In school Mr 
Swango was much interested in the different societies and 
his greatest interest centered in oratory. For some time 
he was in the law office of Ex-Governor Proctor Knott at 
Frankfort and values this experience greatly because of 
his contact with one of the country's most intellectual 
men. For three years previous to coming to Terre Haute 
Mr. Swango was in the land department of the lUinois 
Central Railway, being located in Mississippi. 

In 1899 he located in Terre Haute. Since coming here 
Mr. Swango has widened his acquaintance greatly. For 
one }'ear, in 1904, he was president of the Jackson club. 
Outside of the practice of law he is interested in the 
Wabash Sand & Gravel Company, occupying the position 
of treasurer. Mr. Swango was married in 1903 to Miss 
Elizabeth Williams, of Paris, Illinois. 





TTfi.Ui',: 



DAVID L. WATSON 



"XV/E have a snapshot of "Grandpa" Watson engaged 
' ' in his favorite sport. If there is any other outdoor 
sport that he enjoys more than hunting we have yet 
to learn what is it. There never was a time when Mr. 
Watson did not look upon life with a roseate hue and it 
might be said that he is right now in the heyday and fizz 
of existence, enjoying life and incidentally keeping busy 
enough to lay away a few simoleons for a rainy day. 

To be exact, Mr. Watson was born at the southwest 
corner of Third and Mulberry streets in a frame house 
that is still standing. This was in March, 1859. After 
leaving school he mastered the plumber's trade in the 
establishment conducted by his father, D. W. Watson. 
Plumbing was not altogether to his liking and he went to 
Texas where he engaged in the raising of horses. He 
made frequent trips with stock to Terre Haute and was in 
this line for eight years. As a politician Mr. Watson can 
give a few cards and spades and beat an ordinary hand to 
pieces. "The smile that won't come off" did the work for 
Mr. Watson when he became a candidate for the nomina- 
tion for county clerk in 1894. He was elected by 1,000 
majority on the republican ticket and was re-elected to 
the same position in 1898. He was secretary of tlie repub- 
lican city committee for several years. 

Mr. Watson, since leaving office has purchased 12,000 
acres of land in North Dakota and is doing much to form 
a Terre Haute colony in the northwest. He is president 
of the Interstate Oil Comjiany of Ohio and is also inter- 
ested in the firm of D. W. Watson's Sons. For two years 
he was exalted ruler of the local lodge of Elks and also 
served as district grand exalted ruler of Indiana. Mr. 
Watson is a Mason and a member of the Knights of 
Pythias. 



JAMES W. LANDRUM 



1\ /IR. LANDRUM came from the little town of Emin- 
'■^ ^ ence, Morgan county, Indiana, to Terre Haute. The 
village hardly deserves such a pretentious name 
for only now it has some prospect of getting a steam rail- 
way past its borders. However, Mr. Landrum had little 
choice regarding his birthplace, and even if Eminence has 
not progressed very much in the past fifty years, he still 
has a warm spot in his heart for the place where he first 
came into existence in a little log cabin. 

We have Mr. Landrum loaded down pretty heavily, but 
his shoulders are strong and he likes nothing better than 
being busy. After graduating from the high school class 
of 1874, Mr. Landrum adopted the teaching profession 
and followed it for a number of years. He was principal 
of the Fourth district school when it burned and was also 
principal of the Seventh district school for several years. 
For three years he served as secretary of the school board. 
hVom 1881 to 1887 he was in the office of the auditor of the 
\'andaha and then embarked in the mercantile business, 
becoming manager of the Terre Haute Coal & Lime Com- 
pany. Starting with one horse and wagon the business 
for the first year amounted to $14,000, and at the close 
of the seventh year the books showed a volume of business 
amounting to $75,000. Trade has steadily increased and 
the company only recently moved into its new building on 
Wabash avenue, near Ninth street. Since 1893 Mr. 
Landrum has been secretary of the Coal Bluff Mining 
Company which operates in Greene, Vigo and Clay coun- 
ties. He is also secretary of the Mechanics Building and 
Loan Association. 

Mr. Landrum has been active in politics as far as every 
good citizen should be, and is identified with Centenary 
church as a member of the official board. He is a Mason 
and a member of the Ben Hur order. He has been con- 
nected with the Young Men's Christian Association since 
its organization and is at present chairman of all of the 
most important committees. 





JOHN E. BUDD 



MANY people have traveled all of their lives and yet 
do not know how to behave when on the road. A 
western ticket agent who was anxious to teach 
something about railway etiquette posted the following 
rules: "In traveling by rail on foot, turn to the right on 
discovering an approaching train. If you wish the train 
to turn out, give two loud toots and get in between the 
rails, so that you will not muss up the right-of-way. On 
retiring at night on board a trian do not leave your teeth 
in the ice water tank. If every one should do so it would 
cause great confusion in case of wreck. If you have been 
reared in extreme poverty, and your mother supported 
you until you grew up and married, so that your wife 
could support you, you will probably sit in four seats at 
the same time and extend your feet so that they can be 
wiped off on the clothes of other people." 

It is not within the province of the modern ticket agent 
to tell a person how to act while traveling ; we are supposed 
to know how by this time. But it is a part of the pas- 
senger man's pleasure to tell you all about the best route, 
the beauty of its scenery and superlj eciuipment of his 
road. Mr. Budd is seen here calling attention to the 
Frisco. The catch phrase, "There is something to see 
along the Frisco lines," has become famous. 

Mr. Budd was born in the vicinity of Terre Haute in 
1867. After graduating from a commercial college he 
accepted his first railroad position with the Evansville & 
Terre Haute road as operator and agent at Elnora. Nexj 
he was located in Terre Haute three years for the road as 
an operator and then accepted a position as ticket agent 
for three different railroads at the Paducah, Kentucky, 
union station. Seven years Mr. Budd spent in the west 
in railroad work and then returned to this part of the 
country, identifying himself with the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois railroad. He was stationed in Terre Haute in 
1900. April 1, 1905, he was promoted to his present 
position as city passenger and ticket agent for the Chicago 
& Eastern Illinois and the Evansville & Terre Haute 
roads. 



MALCOLM A. STEELE 



ttX/E are wrong there," said Pilot Steele. "There ain't 

■*■ anything afloat that can get ahead of this craft. 

Good mon, just look how she travels ! 'Tis a biggish 

load for this boat but we will make Provost Landing before 

the sun sets." 

There was a moment of silence and the passenger who 
had been talking to the pilot looked down into the deep 
blue of the beautiful Wabash. Below, a piece of weed 
now and then flashed past, looking like an eel or snake as 
the sunlight glittered upon it. 

"Speaking of my early sailing days," resumed the pilot, 
"I've sailed in a man-'o-war that would clean the sea of 
all floating things in six months. I well remember my 
expedition in the South Sea Islands in 18 — ." Here the 
narrative of the pilot was interrupted as the "City of 
Terre Haute" barely escaped a snag. 

Malcolm A. Steele, who is one of the staunch friends of 
the Wabash, was born in Bullitt county, Kentucky. In- 
stead of being interested in horses as you would naturally 
expect, he is interested in boats. This can be accounted 
for when it is learned that he left the Blue Grass country 
and came to Terre Haute when he was five years of 
age. Upon leaving the high school he entered the office 
of the Wabash Lumber Company and remained there 
until he was appointed clerk in the office of County Clerk 
David Watson in 1 896. Mr. Steele has thoroughly familiar- 
ized himself with his duties and has remained in the county 
clerk's oflice since 1896, having been re-appointed when 
Mr. Berry took charge. 

His greatest hobby is the river and recently Mr. Steele 
had the "City of Terre Haute" built, which plies between 
Terre Haute and the towns south (m the river within a 
distance of fifty miles. 





HARRY T. SCHLOSS 



'T'HERE is no doubt about the political faith of Harry 
T. Schloss. His democracy is just as firm as that 
of David B. Hill or Grover Cleveland, both illustrious 
men in their jiarty. The emblem that Mr. Schloss holds 
to view is one he has been stamping ever since he was old 
enough to vote. While its crow was very nearly stifled at 
the last election, Harry feels that it will flap its wings 
again in victory just as soon as all factional differences are 
settled, and the people return to the ])rinci])les first enun- 
ciated by Andrew Jackson, ct al. 

After leaving school Mr. Schloss entered the clothing 
store which had been established by his father, Philip 
Schloss, one of Terre Haute's best known merchants. One 
year after the death of Mr. Schloss, Sr., a partnership was 
formed by the son with Judy Thorman, the firm now 
being Thorman & Schloss. While giving the proper 
amount of attention to his business, Mr. Schloss has been 
honored liy his ])arty and represented the citizens of the 
old and new Second wards six years in the city council. 
True to his democratic principles he has always regarded 
the interests of the people paramount as his record in the 
council shows. In 190,'! Mr. Schloss rallied the demo- 
cratic forces as county chairman. 

In religious work he is prominent, being president of the 
board of directors of Temple Israel and president of dis- 
trict No. 2 of the B'nai Brith order. Six states are em- 
braced in the district and the position is one of responsi- 
bility as well as honor. Mr. Schloss is a member of Euclid 
lodge No. 573, of the Masonic order and is a director of 
the Phoenix club. 



ROMEO A. WEINSTEIN 



A WELL known liuniorist who enjoys a good cigar, 
tells a story of an experience he had in the west at 
a small town where he was engaged to deliver a 
lecture. After eating his supper he approached the cigar 
counter and purchased a cigar from the proprietor of the 
hotel. The hotel man was talkative and spoke frankly 
about his cigars. After selling the humorist a brand that 
he knew to be good, he picked up an odd looking smoker 
and told this story: "If you will notice you will see that 
each cigar has a spinal column, and this outer debris 
is wrapped around it. One man bought a cigar out of 
that box last week. I told him though, just as I am telling 
you, that they were no good. But he took one and went 
out on the veranda to smoke it. Then he stepped on a 
melon rind and fell with great force on his side. When 
we picked him up, he gasped once and expired. We 
opened his vest hurriedly and found that this cigar with 
the spinal column had been driven through his breast 
bone and had penetrated his heart. The wrapper on the 
cigar never so much as cracked." 

This story emphasizes the difference in cigars. Patrons 
of the Terre Haute House never go out of the building 
for a good cigar. When Romeo Weinstein hands a cigar 
to a customer, the customer knows that it is good without 
any explanations. Mr. Weinstein has been selling cigars 
and tobacco in the Terre Haute House for fifteen years. 
None but high grade tobaccos are handled. This is a very 
good picture of Mr. Weinstein as you may see him a good 
many times in a day. While advising people to "smoke 
up" Mr. Weinstein is also interested in seeing them dress 
up. He is associated with his brother, Louis Weinstein, 
in the men's furnishing business, their Wabash avenue 
store being the most exclusive of its kind in the city. 

Mr. Weinstein is an Elk and a Mason and his greatest 
recreation is fishing. 




^IFOR THE (-C ^ " 




ORVILLE E. RAIDY 



■VTATURE lias endowed the hen witli only a limited 
amount of brain quality, hence she is likely to wander 
on railroad tracks and meet an untimely end. Orville 
K. Raidy is seen here in the act of protecting a few of his 
favorite chickens which arc meandering over the right- 
of way in the vicinity of his farm at St. Mary's. Mr. 
Raidy is a chicken fancier as well as an experienced rail- 
road man. It is his opinion that the hen is not fully 
appreciated. No one can look upon the still features of 
a young hen overtaken by death in life's young morning 
without being visibly affected. And again the death of 
an old hen is regretted, especially by those called upon to 
officiate at her obsec|uies. 

Mr. Raidy is a native of Havanna, Huron county, Ohio. 
He has been in the railroad business since he was fifteen 
years of age, accepting his first position as a fireman on 
the Sandusky division of the Big Four. Later he was with 
the Lake Shore railroad and came to the Vandalia in 1877. 
Starting in as a brakeman on the Terre Haute and Indian- 
apolis division Mr. Raidy has been advanced in rapid 
order, becoming trainmaster of the main line and the Mich- 
igan division in 1885. He held this responsible position 
until 1901 when he was again promoted, being made train- 
master of the Peoria division and road foreman of engines. 
Mr. Raidy has rounded out twenty-eight years in the ser- 
vice of the company. 

He enjoys fishing and is a great lover of liaseball. Seat 
No. y in the Atheltic Park grandstand is generally occupied 
by Mr. Raidy when he has time to see the Hottentots 
play, and he is an energetic "rooter". Mr. Raidy is a 
thirty-second-degree Mason. 



HARRY P. TOWNLEY 



IN 1874 Harry P. Townley came to Terre Haute from 
Cincinnati to visit his brother, James P. Townley. He 
was so favorably impressed with the town that he 
decided to remain and immediately engaged in the hard- 
ware business with his brother. In the language of the 
country editor, what has been Cincinnati's loss is Terre 
Haute's gain 

Mr. Townley was born and reared in Cincinnati and he 
graduated from the Woodward high school in the same 
class with William H. Taft, President Roosevelt's right 
hand man. It was shortly after this that Mr. Townley 
came to Terre Haute. Until- 1884 he was associated with 
his brother in the conduct of the business of the firm known 
as Townley Brothers. At that time the firm became the 
Townley Stove Company, Mr. James L. Townley leaving 
to go to Kansas City, where he is engaged in the same line. 
A general jobbing and retail business is done by the local 
company. While always a busy man Mr. Townley has 
found time to devote his energies to more important 
things than mere money-making. He has always been 
interested in educational affairs and was one of the men 
to organize the Young Men's Christian Association. For 
eight years he was the president of the board of directors 
and still holds a position as director. He was president 
of the board of trustees of Coates College when that insti- 
tution was in its most flourishing condition. He is treas- 
urer of the Winona Assembly and Summer school and is 
deeply interested in the welfare of the Winona Agricultural 
Institute at Winona Lake, and the Winona Technical 
Institute at Indianapolis, both the outgrowth of the 
assembly. 

That Terre Haute is enjoying a cheaper gas rate than 
years ago is probably due to the Fuel Gas Company, of 
which Mr. Townley and several other active citizens were 
promoters. This company operated for eight years, 
making a water gas from crude oil, one of the first plants 
of its kind in the country. Keen competition stifled the 
enterprise and it was finally sold to a rival concern though 
Terre Hauteans for the first time in years, bought gas 
more cheaply than they had before. 





ARTHUR F. GOLDSMITH 



'T~'HIS caricature would have fitted Arthur F. Goldsmith, 
•*■ of the Vigo Commission Company, very well a few 
short years ago, for at that time he was gaining a 
practical knowledge of the business, and juggled numerous 
barrels of cabbages and crates of strawberries during the 
rush hours of the day. There is nothing easy about the 
work connected with the commission business. In the 
summer time it is extremely exacting. For example, 
during the strawberry season Mr. Goldsmith was obUged 
to be up at four o'clock unloading the crates from the 
cars, and he is very glad to have the other fellow do the 
getting up now. The commission men have their troubles 
as well as men in other lines of business. In the summer 
time there is a loss in fruit from decaying, and in the 
winter time there is the constant danger of loss by freez- 
ing. 

Mr. Goldsmith is general manager, secretary and treas- 
urer of the Vigo Commission Company, which does an 
extensive business within a radius of one hundred miles 
of Terre Haute. The business has steadily grown since it 
was taken in charge by Mr. Goldsmith and his brother, 
Fred, five years ago. Mr. Goldsmith was born in St. Louis 
in 1875 and came to Terre Haute when he was five years 
of age. He cjuit the high school before completing his 
course and immediately went into the commission line 
with his father, Charles Goldsmith. Here, both Fred and 
Arthur received the training which has been so valuable 
to them in the conduct of their own establishment. Mr. 
Goldsmith is a member of lodge No. 86, Benevolent and 
Protective Order of Elks, and of the Young Business Men's 
club. Recently he was made an honorary member of 
the Terre Haute Automobile club through the insistence 
of Thomas G. Beggs, and has provided himself with a pair 
of goggles and a long coat at the suggestion of his friend. 



JAMES M'CALL 



A MONG the younger physicians of Terre Haute, Dr. 
James McCall is one of the best known. The mirror 
that the doctor has on his head enables him to peer 
into the cavities of eye, ear, nose and throat and treat 
aihng humanity for its numerous ills. In an age of special- 
ism Dr. McCall has found it to his advantage to confine 
himself more or less to office practice. 

He is a native of the Wolverine state. South Haven 
being the city of his liirth. This is a famous summer 
resort now, but the doctor recalls the time when land that 
is now worth a fabulous price could have been bought for 
a few paltry dollars. Chicago and Kalamazoo furnished 
exceptionally good educational advantages for Dr. McCall 
and he attended school in both of these cities. He did 
not prepare for the medical profession immediately after 
leaving high school, but became a traveling salesman 
representing the hardware department of one of Chicago's 
biggest wholesale houses in Illinois, Iowa and Nebraska 
for some time. During the World's Fair at Chicago, the 
doctor was superintendent of the marine transportation 
department, although he admits that his saihng has been 
confined exclusively to fresh water. He began the study 
of his profession at the Indiana Medical College at Indian- 
apolis and was graduated from that school in 1897. It 
was but a short time afterward that he suffered a severe 
case of blood poisoning the result of wearing an illfitting 
shoe and his left leg was amputated. After Dr. McCall's 
recovery from an illness of six months he was interne at 
the Post Graduate Hospital of Chicago, where he gave 
particular attention to the eye, throat, nose and ear. He 
practiced at Niles and Kalamazoo, Michigan, before coming 
to Terre Haute in 1903. The doctor is genial and sociable 
and has made a large number of friends. 





SIGMUND UFFENHEIMER 



AVT'E would not have you labor under the impression 
by any means that Mr. Uffenheimer is a confirmed 
baseball crank just liecause you see him boarding 
a car bound for tlie liall park. However, when Mr. 
UlTenhcimer is not too busy and can sjiare the time from 
the Herz estaljlishment, it is more than likely tliat you 
will see him every once in a while going to the game. If 
the Hottentots have their batting clothes on and make a 
home run or two, the smile on Mr. Uffenheimer's face 
remains there for several days. Thus does baseball 
smooth the pathway of life and add long years to the 
career of the fan. 

We are very glad that Mr. Uffenheimer took it into his 
head to come over to this side from the old world. He 
was born in Burgebrach, Bavaria, Germany, and when 
he was sixteen years of age sailed for the United States. 
He was located in Philadelphia for one year, but found 
the town too slow and came on west to Terre Haute. He 
began his business career in the Herz Bazaar, a store that 
has had a remarkable growth. From the start Mr. Uffen- 
heimer worked hard for the store's success and has seen 
his hopes realized. He is general manager of the Herz 
establishment and is interested in the business financially. 

The store has had several different locations, each time 
outgrowing, its quarters and is even cramped now in its 
present location on account of the immense volume of 
business transacted. Mr. Uffenheimer is a member of 
the Humboldt Masonic lodge, the B'nai Brith and the 
Phoenix club 



HARRY G. THOMPSON 



IV yiR. THOMPSON is seen here quite busily engaged in 
^ '■'■ looking over the distillery reports and records from 
the storekeepers and gaugers of this district. Uncle 
Sam does a mighty big business here and gives employ- 
ment to a large number of deputy collectors, who see that 
he gets all that is coming to him. The individual who 
attempts to make "wet goods" or sell them without 
Uncle Sam's supervision is monkeying with an awfully bad 
buzz saw. Nicely engraved certificates that cost money 
are absolutely necessary to both the manufacturer and 
the retailer. Then when you get these certificates you 
must not forget to tell Uncle Samuel about what you are 
doing. 

Mr. Thompson is the son of "Indiana's grand old man," 
Colonel Richard Thompson, who for many years was 
prominent in public life. If you enter Mr. Thompson's 
office today you will find a fine portrait of his father there 
and many reminders of the career of the illustrious states- 
man who Hoosiers honored so highly. Harry G. 
Thompson, after graduating from the high school entered 
the law office of his father and studied law for several 
years. When Colonel Richard Thompson became secre- 
tary of the navy he selected his son Harry as his private 
secretary. Returning from Washington, Mr. Thompson 
engaged in journalism for a short time. He was con- 
stantly associated with his father for several years, except 
during the time he was a member of the clerical force in 
the Indiana legislature in 1885. Before being appointed 
to his present position, Mr. Thompson was a deputy in the 
county clerk's office. In 1897 he was appointed de|)uty 
revenue collector under Collector Henry. As deputy in 
charge of the distilleries Mr. Thompson's position is one 
of much responsibihty. His greatest and most enjoyable 
recreation is wheel riding. 





WILLIAM H. BERRY 



ITERE we have n very good likeness of William H. 
Berry, tlie (lis])enser of happiness at the court house. 
Thciui,'h the new law makes it a little mure difificiilt 
tlian formerly to };et a license In wed. Cniinty Clerk Berry 
lias not noticed any diniinishment in I lie vnlume of busi- 
ness. He insists that marriage will always be po]5ular 
in spite of the machinations of the law makers. 

( )n a farm near Weston, West X'irs^inia, the cimnty clerk 
was born. He availed himself of what educational facil- 
ities the times afforded, there being no free schools in 
West Virginia at that time, and when the free schools 
were established he wielded the birch for nnc winter. Then 
he assisted in building a number of free school houses. 
His first railroad position was with the Baltimore & Ohio 
and he fired an engine for a brief time. He next accepted 
a position in the shops of the com])any at Bellaire, Ohio, 
and was there until 1874, when he came to Terre Haute. 
For thirty years and forty-five days Mr. Berry was a 
valued employe of the Vandalia railroad company, work- 
ing upward from various positions in the shops until he 
became general foreman in 1894. 

Mr. Berry's first experience in pohtics was in 1888, 
when he was elected to the legislature. He was re-elected 
to represent Vigo county in 1896. In 1902 he became a 

candidate for the nomination for county clerk on the re- 
l)ublican J ticket. Mr. Berry worked along very quietly 
liut etTectively and won out over his opjionent Ijy 431 
votes. He entered the office in Xovember, 1904, and is 
making a very excellent record. Mr. lierry was married 
to Miss Tillie Deffenbaugh while in Oliio, and is the father 
of threesons, all grt>wn, George, Charles and Alvin. 



WILLIAM CREIGHTON BALL 

•"pUK suliject (if this sketcii was liorn in Terre Haute. 
With the exception of a few years s])ent at Ainlierst, 
Massachusetts, where he was graduated from Am- 
herst college, and a few years in which he tauglit, math- 
ematics chielly, in the St. Louis high school, he lias passed 
his entire life in Terre Haute and Vigo coimty, for which 
he has an intense loyalty. 

When c|uite a youth working on liis father's farm at 
Spring Hill, in Honey Creek township, Mr. Ball showed 
his fondness for fight and for taking part in pubHc affairs, 
by enlisting for service in the civil war. As he was then 
considerably under age, and as his father needed him 
badly on the farm, since an elder son was in tlie I'nion 
army, William was yanked out of the service, nuich to 
his regret. 

But as he entered journalism, after a brief career prac- 
ticing law, and as journalism that amounts to anything is 
one long battle, he probably satisfied his martial S])irit. 
He bought a half interest in the Terre Haute Gazette in 
1872 and retired from the Ijusiness in 1904, after thirty- 
two years useful and strenuous service with very few 
furloughs. 

He is now and has for many years been president of the 
board of trustees of the Rose Polytechnic Institute and a 
member of the Ijoard of trustees of the Indiana Reform 
School for Boys, at Plainfield. 

As a toastmaster Mr. Ball has few equals and his ser- 
vices have been in demand upon numerous occasions. 





J. IRVING RIDDLE 



ttVVT'AUSEON! Wauseon!" shouts the Lake Shore 
''V brakeman. And then the passengers look some- 
what startled as if they did not know whether 
"he" was "on" or not. It is related of one absent- 
minded passenger that when he heard the name of this 
station in Ohio called out for tlie first time he replied to 
the man in the uniform that the fellow had "got off" at 
the other station. 

Wauseon, Ohio, is the birthplace of J. Irving Riddle, 
state agent of the Phoenix Fire Insurance Company, of 
Brooklyn, and one of the best known men in the insurance 
business in Terre Haute. Properly speaking, Mr. Riddle 
was not born inside the city limits. He was one of the 
log cabin babies and grew up in a heavily timbered country 
where some strong muscular work was necessary in order 
to clear a place for the wheat, oats and corn. After at- 
tending the Wauseon schools and the Williams Center 
Academy, Mr. Riddle began teaching school and working 
insurance in the summer. He continued along these lines 
for nineteen years when he became the representative of 
the Phoenix in Wauseon, and had about ten counties in 
his district. In 1873 he came to Terre Haute and went 
into partnership w'ith W. B. Wharton in the insurance 
business. After the death of Mr. Wharton, the Riddle- 
Hamilton Company was organized, with Mr. Riddle as 
president. He was appointed state agent of the Phcenix 
in 1874. In this position Mr. Riddle has charge of four 
hundred agents, and travels on an average of 30,000 
miles a year. He figures that he has traveled one million 
and a c|uarter miles in his life time, which is doing pretty 
well. Every day the premiums of the company in Indiana 
amount to $1,000. 

Mr. Riddle finds great pleasure in hunting and each 
year visits Arkansas, where he owns a plantation which 
abounds in a great variety of game. Our snap shot was 
made in the tall timber there. He has always been inter- 
ested in church work and is a trustee of the Central Chris- 
tian church. Mr. Riddle's greatest hobliy is collecting 
portraits of well known insurance men. He has always 
been a republican and has been active in state politics for 
years though he has never cared for a public office. 



WORTH B. STEELE 



THE man leading the G. O. P. elephant is Worth B. 
Steele. He is appropriately thus pictured because 
he has been chairman of the republican city central 
committee three different times and has been offered the 
job for the fourth time. He knows how to guide the 
republican elephant along paths of safety. He has been 
on its back in political campaigns of the past and under- 
stands all of its tricks. You will notice that the elephant 
is now willing to be led. It was Mr. Steele's abilities as a 
campaign worker and organizer that led to his selection 
by the republicans so many times. 

The pachyderm business is only a side issue with Mr. 
Steele. He is one of Terre Haute's best known business 
men and is the general manager of tlie Hooton Lumber 
Company. There is no man in Terre Haute more inter- 
ested in seeing the town develop, for this means that more 
lumber will be sold from the Hooton yards. Mr. Steele 
was born at Hustonville, Ilhnois, and moved to Terre 
Haute when he was sixteen years of age. He supple- 
mented his training in the public schools with a Com- 
mercial college course and held his first position as a book- 
keeper in a wholesale grocery house at I,iiuisville. He 
returned to Terre Haute in 1881 and engaged in the lumber 
business with T. B. Johns. In 1897 he became general 
manager for the Hooton Luml^er Com])any. The concern 
does a large retail business and its yards are among the 
most extensive in the city. 

Mr. Steele has served as councilman from the old Second 
ward and has led the elephant through three city cam- 
paigns. He enjoys automobiling and spends his vaca- 
tions at Maxinkuckee in the summer time, where he fishes 
for bass. He is a member of the Masonic orders and, 
withal, a very genial Terre Hautean. 





RAY FORTUNE 



nPHE average lover of the weed knows littlejaboutjtlie 
■*• trouble the work incident to the manufacture and 
llie sale of a cigar or a plug of tobacco. In the first 
jilace, the manufacturer must give a strict accounting in 
this district to Mr. Fortune, as to the quantity of tobacco 
he has purchased. Then he must tell him how many 
cigars he has made out of the tobacco purchased and also 
inform him of the number of revenue stamps cancelled. 
Down at the brewery, Mr. Fortune watches the pipe and 
bond cellar and knows almost to a teasjjoonful how nnich 
beer goes into the bottling department. He carries the 
keys that unlock the big storage tanks of beer, and looks 
carefully to see that the government is given the right 
accounting. 

Mr. Fortune is still living in the same house in which 
he was liorn on North Twelfth street, in 1878. He played 
around the front gate of his home with the other boys of 
North Twelfth until he started to scliool and got tixi big 
to play. He spent three years in the high scliool and 
then completed a course in a commercial coUe.ge. Among 
his first positions was that with the J. R. Duncan Com- 
pany, with whom he became cashier. Then he acce])ted 
a place in the mechanical department of the Vandalia. 
For one year and a half he w'as work inspector in the 
machine shops of the Union Pacific, under \A'. R. McKeen, 
Jr., at Cheyenne. One experience that Mr. Fortune will 
always remember was his venture in tlie real estate busi- 
ness in Colorado after leaving Cheyenne. He was sent 
from Denver to boom a town site where a railroad was 
expected to transform a lonely cut in the mountains into 
a western metropolis. The railroad failed to strike the 
town, property values dropped, and the real estate agent 
came back to Terre Maute. Mr. F'ortune was appointed 
dejiuty revenue collector in March 1905. 



ADOLPH NEUKOM 



THEY tell the story of a deaf old lady, win., with her 
daughter, happened to be aboard a railmail train 
which jumped the track and jumbled the passengers 
together in heaps. The two ladies were rescued uninjured 
and assisted to a grassy knoll, where they were left to 
recover from their shock, while their rescuers turned their 
attention to more serious cases. Among the passengers 
was a kindly disposed elderly gentleman who passed from 
one group to another seeking to comfort and reassure the 
distressed. On reaching the two referred to he said 
gentlv, as he j^laced his hand soothini^dv u])on llie mother's 
arm; 

"Have courage, ladies, and rememlier that a kind 
heaven bends over all." 

Turning quickly to the daughter, tlie mother asked in 
jerky syllables: 

"What's the old fool saying about men's overalls?" 

Of course it would have been foolish to discuss such a 
subject at such a time; however, if Adolph Neukom had 
been there it wouldn't have been astonishing to hear him 
broach the subject even under such unfavorable con- 
ditions. This is because overalls are his hobby. He is 
superintendent of the Stahl-Urban Company, which makes 
carloads of these necessary garments each year. In fact 
workingmen's garments of all kinds are made by this com- 
pany. We know that llr. Xeukom is a republican and 
he seems strongly in favor of "protection" for the work- 
ingman. 

Mr. Xeukom is a native Terre Hautean, and was born 
here in 1886. Upon leaving the high school he went into 
the office of the Havens & Geddes Company, and after 
being there six years accepted a position with the Stahl- 
Urban Company, where he has become an indespensable 
])art of the establishment. He is a jolly good fellow ; an 
Elk, a Mason, a member of the Kni.ghts of Pythias and an 
I )dd Fellow. He would rather bowl ten ])ins when he has 
the time than to do anything else. 





JOHN J. CLEARY 



IT is really necessary to be a natural born good fellow in 
■'■ order to be successful in the hotel business. The per- 
sonality of the man behind the register has much to 
do with keeping the house well tilled and the guests in 
good humor. Mr. Cleary has the happy faculty of doing 
both of these essential things, but he does not lill his 
guests as the St. Nicholas is not operated on that ])lan. 
We see Mr. Cleary here in the act of tapping the bell. 
This is a call for help and is quickly answered unless the 
helper — the bell boy — is asleep or reading a tale about 
Deadwood Dick. 

Thirty-one years ago Mr. Cleary was born in Terre 
Haute. He enjoyed Hfe just like all other boys and 
commenced to get more serious wlien he entered the high 
school, graduating with the class of 189.i. His first 
position was in the office of County Clerk Roquet, and he 
remained there four years and a few months, serving the 
last four weeks of his time in the office under Mr. Watson, 
the successor of Mr. Roquet. 

In 1899 Mr. Cleary became a partner with Mr. Frank 
Hoerman in the seed business. After learning more about 
the seedy families than he ever knew before, Mr. Cleary 
retired from the seed business in 1902. Along about this 
time be became interested in politics and procured 
the nomination for auditor on the democratic ticket. He 
made a very creditable race for election but could nut stem 
the big republican landslide which took with it several 
other good democrats. After organizing the Cleary Coal 
and Supply Company, later disposing of his interests, 
Mr. Cleary became a partner with Maurice Walsh in the 
conduct of the St. Nicholas hotel. In June, 1904, Mr. 
Cleary became sole proprietor of the hostelry on Ninth 
street. The St. Nicholas is deservedly popular with the 
commercial travelers. Mr. Cleary is a member of No. 86, 
lodge of Elks. His greatest s])ort is fntmd in shooting 
ducks and other wild game. 



EDWARD A. KIEFNER 



IT has not Ijeen so very long ago that Edward A. Kiefner 
^ was a traveUng salesman. For eleven years he 
chucked indigestible food at various hotels in Indiana 
and made up his mind that if he ever left the road he 
would manage a hotel and give the "drummers" some- 
thing good to eat, a clean bed and ice water when they 
asked for it, Mr. Kiefner knows that of all men the 
traveling man has a hard life and there is nothing so much 
appreciated by the fraternity as a good place to sleep and 
eat. 

At nineteen vcars of age .Mr. Kiefner (|uit slacking hay 
on the farm in Illinois on which he was born and came 
to Terre Haute. His first position was ])rocured at the 
Filbeck hotel, where he gained some knowledge of the 
business but did not put it into practical use until many 
years later. He was not in the hotel very long until he 
was offered a place with the United States Biscuit Com- 
pany, which was later absorbed by the trust. He began 
as shipping clerk and worked his way upward, until he 
was sent out nn the road to sell the baking ]]roducts made 
by the cnmpanv. He was quite successful as a salesman 
and remained in this position for eleven years. In 
March, 1904, Mr. Kiefner became proprietor of the New 
National hotel. From the first day he took charge, the 
hotel began to show the effect of Mr. Kiefner's hustling 
and within a remarkably short time the business had 
increased wonderfully. There is no more popular 
stopping place in the town for the travelers and it is 
virtually "T. P. A. headquarters." 

Mr. Kiefner is one of the most active members of Post 
G, of the Travelers' Protective Association, and for one 
year was its president. He has served as a director on 
the post board and was a member of the state board two 
years. He is also an active memljer of the I'niled Com- 
mercial Travelers, the Knights of Pythias and the Masons. 





FRANK LESLIE CAMPBELL 



\/( )r wiiiild immediately infer fn)in tliis caricature tliat 
Mr. Cumpliell is a railnjad man frnm head tn feet. 
He is. He has swimg a lantern in just this fashion as a 
freight l^rakeman and has even smashed trunks as a bag- 
gage master. His upward rise in the railroad world has 
l5een very ititeresting. Tliere are yet a few people in 
Terre Haute wlio remember Mr. Campbell when he stood 
on tlie front end of a street car and drove a mule cm the 
line tliat ran from I lie old Chestnut street depot to the 
Terre Haute hcmse. One of tlie first problems in trans- 
portation that he had to overcome was tlie old mule 
"Dixie," the biggest mule that was ever used on the local 
street railway sytsem. Before the advent of electricity 
in tlie street railway business Mr. Campbell had become 
a railroad man. 

He has about lived down the fact tliat he was born in 
Evansville. Mr. Campbell left there when he was five 
years of age. He Hved in \"incennes and Cinncinati after- 
wards, getting his education in these cities. He arrived 
in Terre Haute from Cincinnati in 1873. He drove a 
grocery wa.gon and "Dixie" and was in the Union depot 
restaurant before lie Ijecame a Vandalia yard clerk in 
1879. Xext he smashed trunks, twisted brakes, was a 
freight conductor, took up tickets on a passenger train 
and in 1894 was ])roiiioled to tlie posilitm of trainmaster 
of the Peoria division. In 1896 he was made road fore- 
man of engines in addilimi to his duties as trainmaster. 
In Decemljer, 1901, he was advanced at liis present respon- 
sible position, that of trLiinmaster of the main line of the 
Vandalia. 

He is an Klk and a member of several fraternal orders. 



JAMES B. WALSH 



■ I 'HE hippopotamus and the elephant need no shoes. 
■*■ Nature has provided them with a covering that will 
protect their feet under ])ractically all circumstances. 
In the garden of Eden Adam roamed about barefooted, 
Sandals were good enough for the Romans and Greeks. 
As civilization has progressed, there has been more and 
more doing in the shoe business, until now, no respectable 
American cares to go about barefooted if he can help it. 
It is now up to the people to provide themselves with 
something in which to clothe their feet. As we see Mr. 
Walsh here, we almost expect to hear him say something 
about the sole-construction, honest workmanship and the 
faultless style of the shoe which he is holding. 

AVith all due respect to Canada, we insist that there 
are greater opportunities in the United States for the 
young man. Mr. Walsh came to this conclusion when 
he was twenty years of age. He was born at Port Hope, 
Ontario, where he received his education. He took his 
first position on this side of the great lakes in a whi lie- 
sale commission shoe house in Cleveland. The firm witli 
which Mr. Walsh was identified, later moved to Chicago. 
In the Windy City, Mr. Walsh became confidential man 
for the commission house and gathered a greater knowl- 
edge of the shoe business. His first venture in the retail 
line was at Springfield, Illinois, where, with a partner, he 
opened a large store. A branch store w'as established in 
Terre Haute in 1899 and Mr. Walsh came here to take 
charge. Upon the dissolution of the partnership Mr. 
Walsh became proprietor and manager of the store here. 

There is no more active worker in the Knights of Co- 
lumbus Council than Mr. Walsh, who is grand knight. 
He is warden of the State Council and has represented the 
Terre Haute Council in the state conventions four times. 
Mr. Walsh is one of the directors of the Retail Merchants 
Association and is a firm believer in Terre Haute's future. 
When it comes to recreation he would rather see a good 
base ball game than any other outdoor sport. 





R. VOORHEES NEWTON 



OO far as is known, Sir William Blackstone wrote upon 
*^ a great many subjects and lias proved a great friend 
to the lawyers. The volume that Mr. Newton is 
taking from his book case is one on mining but we are in 
doubt about the author of the book being the same Black- 
stone who wrote the celebrated commentaries on the laws 
of England. Mr. Newton has few hobbies, but outside 
of law he is interested, to some extent, in mining. 

He is a director and attorney for the Tornado Mining 
Company, whose property is located in Saguache county, 
Colorado. The stockholders are Terre Haute people and 
the business of the company is conducted on a purely 
mutual plan. Several valuable claims are held, and gold, 
silver, and lead are found on the property, the assays 
showing up remarkably well. Already improved ma- 
chinery has been put in operation at the mines and ore 
is being taken out in large quantities. The local officers 
are: Dr. W. H. Baker, president; W. I. Law, vice-presi- 
dent; H. C. Albrechl, secretary; Frank Teel, treasurer; 
directors, including the officers, Charles M. Miller, F. O. 
Froeb and R. V. Newton. 

Mr. Newton is a native of Parke county, having lieen 
born on a farm near Rosedale. He attended the Indiana 
State Normal School and the Indiana Normal School at 
Ladoga, later taking a commercial colle.ge course. For a 
time he was in the office of J. R. Duncan & Company, and 
then began the study of law in the office of Rhoades & 
Wilhams. He went to Ann Arbor in 1891, graduating 
from the law department in 189.T. Returning to Terre 
Haute, he commenced the practice of law in the office of 
Rhoades & WiUiams, continuing there until the death of 
Judge Rhoades, when he formed a partnership with W. A. 
Kerns. After three years he opened an office for himself. 
Mr. Newton has given particular attention to the probate 
feature of the civil law, though his practice is general. 

He is Past Grand Master of Terre Haute lodge I.O. <). F., 
No. 51, and is also a member of Canton McKeen. 



HUGH H. SHIRKIE 



r'ROM Aryshire, in the lowlands of Scotland, came 
Hugh Shirkie to the land of the stars and stripes, 
when he was nine years of age. Family after family 
of the Shirkies have lieen engaged in the coal mining 
Ijusiness and when this liranch of the Shirkie family settled 
in Vdungtsown, (Jhio, they continued at tlieir old trade. 
Hugh Shirkie knows the mining business from bottom 
to top. He is practical if anything, and this no doubt 
has contributed no little amount to his success. This is 
a very good picture of Mr. Shirkie as he might have been 
seen a number i>f years ago. However, at present it is 
ciuite dilTerent. 

Mr. Shirkie did not reside long at Youngstoun until he 
came to Carbon, Indiana, where the family located. He 
began to develop the coal interests of Indiana immediately, 
opening a mine at lUiana. Then he moved to Clinton 
and engaged in mining on a more extensive scale, and 
became in time one of the best known operators in the 
state. He was with his father and brother in the business 
for some time and finally became the owner of three mines. 
These he sold recently to the Dering Company, of Chicago. 
The Dering people wanted a good man and selected Mr. 
Shirkie to look after their eight mines. He is district 
manager of the company with offices in the Grand Opera 
House block, and is kept pretty busy. The output of the 
eight shafts is between seven and eight thousand tons 
daily, a majority of them being in the vicinity of Terre 
Haute, while the shaft farthest distant from this citv is 
the Big Four mine near St. Louis. Mr. Shirkie is a mem- 
ber of all of the Masonic bodies and is also a well known 
member of the local lodge of Elks. 





HARRY CARGILL HAMPTON 



WHEN the "Hottentots" are winning, a smile plays 
on the face of ,Mr. Hampton and he has Ijeen known 
to stick by the team pretty well even when a losing 
streak is encountered. But there remains one great 
privilege to the fan, lie is entitled to "knock" or "boost" 
just as he pleases. If there were no base ball games of 
the professional kind in Terre Haute, it is safe to say that 
Mr. Hampton would lend his presence to any cross-lot 
contest that might be in progress, either in Fasigville or 
West Terre Haute. He would do this because he likes 
the game and considers base ball about the greatest sport 
ever invented. 

Mr. Hampton was Ijorn in Bob Taylor's state, "Sunny 
Tennessee," in the old river town of Memphis, in 1867. 
His father, Henry Hampton, was one of the proprietors 
of the "Appeal-Avalanche" in its early days and the son 
had a narrow escape from becoming a newspaper man. 
Mr. Hampton, Sr., moved to California when Harry was 
fjuite young, having charge of extensive properties be- 
longing to Ben Holladay, a well known character in the 
boom days of the Pacific coast towns. After living in the 
west for several years, Mr. Hampton returned to the east 
and located in New York. He later attended school at 
Washington, D. C. After his school days in Washington 
Mr. Hamjjton went to Memphis, where he was engaged two 
years in the cotton business with an uncle. He returned 
to New York and was in the publishing offices of Frank A. 
Munsey, being business manager of the Daily Continental 
which was pubHshed a short time by Mr. Munsey. 

Twelve years ago Mr. Hampton came to Terre Haute 
and began his work with the Vandalia system. He was 
appointed assistant treasurer when Mr. Thompson was 
elected to the position of treasurer. Mr. Hampton has a 
wide circle of friends and is deservedly popular. He is a 
memlicr of tlie I'Hks lodge. No. 86. 



DAVID B. STEEG 



IF you intend to go to Xew York or some other eastern 
point just ask Mr. Steeg what train on tlie ^■andalia 
is the best one for your trip. He will rejily immedi- 
ately that No. 26 is aliout the greatest train that the 
VandaHa system ever |nit on the road. Mr. Steei; is the 
traveling passenger a.i;ent for the \'andalia and knows 
what he is talking aliout. You will note in the picture 
that Xo. 26 is carrying; somewhat of a load, vet making 
enough headway to cause the jiassenger on top to retain 
a firm hold. 

Mr. Steeg has been in the railroad business practicallv 
all of his life, learning tclegraijhy at I.imedale [unction. 
The station was but a short distance from his home and 
th.e click of the telegra])h instrument was music to his 
ears, even when he \Nas a small boy loitering aliout the 
station jjlatform. He held his first position at the junc- 
tion depot as an operator and was promoted to be a.gent 
at that station in 1894. Mr. Steeg attended strictly to 
his business and when the officials wanted a man to repre- 
sent them in this territory they selected the agent at Lime- 
dale Junction. Mr. Steeg's territory is from Indiana]:iolis 
to St. Louis and all lines tribula'v. He has some very 
keen competition, but e\idently the Vandalia is getting 
its share of business. Train No. 26, as well as the other 
excellent trains on the system, is "boosted" ])retty hard 
by Mr. Steeg. 

Limedale, in Putnam county, is the birthplace of Mr. 
Steeg. He attended school there and at Greencastle. He 
is a thorough Terre Hautean now and is a member of the 
Young Business Men's club and Euclid lodge of the Masons. 





ROBERT BELL THOMPSON 



■ I 'HERE is no chance for any one else to get into the 
sack while Mr. Thompson occupies his [jresent 
position as treasurer for the Vandalia railroad. A 
Scotchman knows his duty and generullv performs it well. 
The treasury of any institution is ]>retty well res])ected 
and it furnishes an incentive to work that is simply won- 
derful. When the bill is D. K.. Mr. Thomjison pays it. 
It is from this big sack that Paymaster Crawford gets his 
money, and later it finds the way into channels of trade 
that greatly lienetits Terre Haute. 

Abroath, Scotland, is the birth])lace of Mr. Thf>mpson, 
and he lived there until he was ei.ght years of age. Then 
he moved to the smoke-lie.grimmed and foggy town of 
London, where he remained two years longer. It was 
then that his parents learned of Terre Haute through an 
old friend who had already settled down on the banks of 
the \\'abash. The Thompsons decided to come to Indi- 
ana. Upon -Mr. Thompson's arrival he proceeded to get 
rid of his broad accent by going to school. He left the 
high school before completing the full course and accepted 
his first position in an insurance ofhce where lie acted as 
collector and wrote policies. He received his hardest 
bumps in the capacity of collector. He dates his term 
of service with the old relialile \andalia from 1881 when 
he began work in the local freight office. He spent seven 
years in this department and was then one year in the 
auditor's ofTice. In 1889 he became clerk in the ofhce of 
Treasurer J. W. Cruft. \Mien Mr. Cruft resigned in 189,3 
Mr. Thompson was elected to succeed him. 



THOMAS GIBSON BEGGS 



A UTOMOBILEXSIS has a firm grip on a number of 
Terre Hauteans and no one has suffered a more 
severe attack than has Mr. Beggs. He is not looking 
for a cure, l^ecause he enjoy autoing too well to give up 
the pleasure. In fact, he has a hopeless case. When made 
up for one of his long distance trips Mr. Beggs strongly 
resembles a deep sea diver. He has made several remark- 
ably quick trips to Clinton, the sign board indicating that 
he is bound for the mining city now. With his Peerless 
car carrying five passengers, Mr. Beggs made the run from 
Clinton to Terre Haute in thirty minutes last summer 
The record, however, was smashed shortly afterwards by 
Herman Hulman, five minutes being clipped ofi the time. 
Mr. Hulman's car was completely stripped for the trial, 
which gave him a considerable advantage. 

Mr. Beggs is a Hoosier by birth, his voice first being 
heard by the people of the thriving village of Laurel, near 
Connersville. He mcjved from Laurel to Shelbyville, the 
stronghold of Indiana democracy, at nine years of age. 
He attended college at Lebanon, Ohio, and upon finishing 
his course came to Terre Haute shortly afterwards, in 
1891. Mr. Beggs' father had been engaged in the dis- 
tilling business and it was natural that the son should 
adopt a business which has been closely associated with 
the family name for so many years. 

Mr. Beggs is superintendent of the Commercial Dis- 
tillery, the largest independent concern of its kind in the 
country. He has a thorough and practical knowledge of 
the art of distilling and has been very successful. Mr. 
Beggs is an Elk and one of the best known 3'oung men in 
the citv. 





J. HARRY MILLER 



J HARRY MILLER apjiears here in a garlj that is very 
■ familiar to tlie ])olo fan. As a goal tender he was 
unquestionaljlv one of the best in the city amateur 
league during the first two seasons that tlie game was 
seen in Terre Haute. He admits this liimself, and he 
ought to know. It is no snap to tend goal in tlie modern 
game of roller polo. It is the fastest indoor sport on earth 
and can be rougher than a foot ball game when the referee 
isn't looking. It oftimes becomes the painful duty of the 
goal tender to throw his crooked stick in front <jf a rusher 
that is dangerously near the cage, and by keeping the 
stick swinging in a threatening manner constantly to in- 
timidate any ojjposing player who is playing soHtaire with 
the liall at the rear of the cage. A real dj'ed-in-thc-wool 
polo fan will ]ia\vn his shoes at any time to see the game. 

But this is only a side issue of Harry's. He has other 
more important affairs. Besides rigging himself u]) in a 
goal tender's suit he is kept busy as a member of the 
tailoring firm of Millers in rigging up other men in suits of 
serge, flannels, worsteds and other more expensive cloths. 
He is associated with his brother, Charles A. Miller, in the 
tailoring business, their stores being established in the 
Grand Opera House block and at No. 813 Wabash avenue. 

Mr. Miller was born on February 29th — note the date — 
in 1880, a leap year. He attended the local schools and 
spent three years at Culver Military Academy. He has 
always been a lover of athletics which accounts for the 
interest he has taken in polo. Just as soon as he was out 
of school he went into the tailoring line. He is an Elk 
and a member of the I'niform Rank i>f the Knights of 
Pythias, Company No. 3. 



THOMAS GIBSON BEGGS 



A UTOMOBILEXSIS has a firm grip on a number of 
Terre Hauteans and no one has suffered a more 
severe attack than has Mr. Beggs. He is not looking 
for a cure, because he enjoy autoing too well to give up 
the pleasure. In fact, he has a hopeless case. When made 
up for one of his long distance trips Mr. Beggs strongly 
resembles a deep sea diver. He has made several remark- 
ably quick trips to Clinton, the sign board indicating that 
he is bound for the mining city now. With his Peerless 
car carrying five passengers, Mr. Beggs made the run from 
Clinton to Terre Haute in thirty minutes last summer 
Tile record, however, was smashed shortly afterwards by 
Herman Hulman, five minutes being clipped oft' the time. 
Mr. Hulman's car was completely stripped for the trial, 
which gave him a considerable advantage. 

Mr. Beggs is a Hoosier by birth, his voice first being 
heard by the people of the thriving village of Laurel, near 
Connersville. He moved from Laurel to Shelby\'ille, the 
stronghold of Indiana democracy, at nine years of age. 
He attended college at Lebanon, Ohio, and upon finishing 
his course came to Terre Haute shortly afterwards, in 
1891. Mr. Beggs' father had been engaged in the dis- 
tilling business and it was natural that the son should 
adopt a business which has been closely associated with 
the family name for so many years. 

Mr. Beggs is superintendent of the Commercial Dis- 
tillery, the largest independent concern of its kind in the 
country. He has a thorough and practical knowledge of 
the art of distilling and has been very successful. Mr. 
Beggs is an Elk and one of the best known young men in 
the citv. 





J. HARRY MILLER 



J HARRY MILLKR appears here in a garli that is very 
* faniihar to tlie ])(ilo fan. As a goal tender he was 
nn(|ueslional)ly one of tlie l)est in the city amateur 
league during the first two seasons thai the game was 
seen in Terre Haute. He admits this himself, and he 
ought to know. It is no snap to tend goal in the modern 
game of roller ])olo. It is the f;istest indoor sport on earth 
and can be rougher than a foot ball game when the referee 
isn't looking. It oftimes becomes the painful duty of the 
goal tender to throw his crooked slick in front i.if a rusher 
that is dangerously near the cage, and by keeping the 
stick swinging in a threatening manner constantly to in- 
timidate any opposing player who is jilaying solitaire with 
the ball at the rear of the cage. A real dyed-in-the-wool 
polo fan will pawn his shoes at any time to see the .game. 

But this is only a side issue of Harry's. He has other 
more imporlant affairs. Besides rigging himself up in a 
goal tender's suit he is kept busy as a member of the 
tailoring firm of Millers in rigging up other men in suits of 
serge, flannels, worsteds and other more expensive cloths. 
' He is associated with his brother, Charles A. Miller, in the 
tailoring business, their stores being established in the 
Grand Opera House block and at No. 813 Wabash avenue. 

Mr. Miller was born on February 29th — note the date — 
in 1880, a leap year. He attended the local schools and 
spent three years at Culver MiUtary Academy. He has 
alwavs been a lo\cr of allilclics which accoimts for the 
interest he has taken in jiolo. Just as soon as he was out 
of school he weiU int(j the tailoring line. He is an Elk 
and a member of the Uniform Rank of the Knights of 
Pythias, Com])any No. .3. 



AMAZIAH W. VAUGHAN 



NEWCASTLE on the Tyne, England, is the birthplace 
of one Terre Haute public ofticial, Aniaziah W. 
\'aughan, a member of the board of public works. 
All the world knows that England produces men who 
know how to govern and who regard a public position as 
one of public trust. This may account for the conscien- 
tious manner in which Mr. \'aughan discharges his duties, 
whether as a member of the city council or in his present 
responsible position. 

For the first time in many years the streets are present- 
ing a cleanly appearance. For this we must thank Mr. 
\'aughan and his colleagues who recently brought 
about the change by purchasing some modern street 
flushers. Mr. Vaughan was so much in earnest about the 
streets being cleaner that a photograph has been taken 
of him as he is driving one of the new flushers. 

When four years of age Mr. Vaughan's parents moved 
to this country, locating at PittsLiurg. He attended 
school in the Smoky City for a time, until his parents 
moved farther west, to Canton, Illinois. For two years 
Mr. Vaughan studied medicine in Canton, but finally de- 
ciding that a business calling would suit him better 
engaged in the retail tobacco trade. Later he went to 
West Virginia where he learned the nail manufacturing 
business. He came to Terre Haute in 1877 and was as- 
sistant superintendent of the old nail mill here for four 
years. He remained with the Crawfords in the iron business 
holding the position of roll turner and has been in that 
trade more or less for a number of years. Mr. Vaughan 
has been given a thorough trial by the people in the city 
council and has not been found wanting. He represented 
the Third w'ard as republican councilman for four years 
and served another term of two years as councilman-at- 
large. He was elected a.gain for a two-years term and 
resigned his seat in the coimcil to accept a place tendered 
on the board of safety by Mayor Bidaman. Mr. \'aughan 
is a Mason and also belongs to the .\ncienl Order of United 
Workmen. 





BEN TEMPLE WEBSTER 



WHILE leaning on the New York Life, Mr. \\'ebster 
might give you a few good reasons why. He is 
thoroughly conversant with the subject. In fact, 
life insurance is Mr. Webster's hobby. It is one hobby 
he rides a great deal, but it will stand without hitching. 
In a day and age when poeple think for themselves on 
matters of life and death, the insurance c|uestion is one 
that is always timely. He would have you lean on the 
New York Life just as he does. Wlien it comes lo de- 
ciding, he would have you "Do it now." 

Mr. Webster did not go into the life insurance business 
because he had nothing else to do. In fact he was trained 
for the legal profession. He believes that the insurance 
business is about the most important of all. By care- 
fully studying it from the ground floor to the roof garden 
he has made a success of it and has been honored with a 
responsible position by his company in Terre Haute, being 
agency director and having charge of western Indiana. 

Mr. Webster was born in Fredonia, New York, a pretty 
little city of the Empire state, in w'hich one of the normal 
schools is located. Mr. Webster finished the graded 
schools and for a time was a student in the normal school. 
He had his eye on the legal profession and entered the 
law department of Georgetown University at Washington, 
D. C, where he graduated. LIpon the com])letion of liis 
legal course he entered the employ of tlie New York Life 
Insurance Company. Mr. Webster re])resented liis com- 
pany in Peoria, Illinois, for nearly seven years, three 
years being spent as district manager. He became agency 
director in Terre Haute in 1904. The com])any with its 
many different forms of pohcies and substantial founda- 
tion has met with favor here. Offices are maintained in 
the Rose Dispensary building. 

Mr. Webster believes the New York Life is the biggest 
coniiiany in every way and has good ]iriiof and argument 
with whicli to l)ack u]i liis belief. 



AMAZIAH W. VAUGHAN 



NEWCASTLE on tlie Tyne, England, is the birthplace 
of one Terre Haute public official, Amaziah W. 
Vaughan, a member of the board of public works. 
All the world knows that England produces men who 
know how to govern and who regard a public position as 
one of public trust. This may account for the conscien- 
tious manner in which Mr. ^'augllan discharges his duties, 
whether as a member of the city council or in his present 
responsible position. 

For the first time in many years the streets are present- 
ing a cleanly appearance. For this we must thank Mr. 
Vaughan and his colleagues who recently brought 
about the change by purchasing some modern street 
flushers. Mr. Vaughan was so much in earnest about the 
streets being cleaner that a photograph has been taken 
of him as he is driving one of the new flushers. 

When four years of age Mr. Vaughan's parents moved 
to this country, locating at Pittsburg. He attended 
school in the Smoky City for a time, until his parents 
moved farther west, to Canton, Illinois. For two years 
Mr. Vaughan studied medicine in Canton, but finally de- 
ciding that a business calling would suit him better 
engaged in the retail tobacco trade. Later he went to 
\\'est Mrginia where he learned the nail manufacturing 
business. He came to Terre Haute in 1877 and was as- 
sistant superintendent of the old nail mill here for four 
years. He remained with the Crawfords in the iron business 
holding the position of roll turner and has been in that 
trade more or less for a number of years. Mr. Vaughan 
has been given a thorough trial by the people in the city 
council and has not been found wanting. He represented 
the Third ward as republican councilman for four years 
and served another term of two years as councilman-at- 
large. He was elected again for a two-years term and 
resigned his seat in the council to accept a place tendered 
on the board of safety by Mayor Bidaman. Mr. Vaughan 
is a Mason and also belongs to the .\ncient Order of United 
Workmen. 





BEN TEMPLE WEBSTER 



WHILE leaning on the New York Life, Mr. Webster 
might give you a few good reasons why. He is 
thoroughly conversant with the subject. In fact, 
life insurance is Mr. Webster's Imliliy. It is one hobby 
he rides a great deal, but it will stand without hitching. 
In a day and age when poeple think for themselves on 
matters of life and death, the insurance question is one 
that is always timely. He would have you lean on the 
New York Life just as he does. When it ci>mes to de- 
ciding, he would have you "Do it now." 

Mr. Webster did not go into the life insurance business 
because he had nothing else to do. In fact he was trained 
for the legal profession. He believes that the insurance 
business is about the most important of all. By care- 
fully studying it from the ground floor to the roof garden 
he has made a success of it and has been honored with a 
responsible position by his company in Terre Haute, being 
agency director and having charge of western Indiana. 

Mr. Webster was born in Fredonia, New York, a pretty 
little city of the Empire state, in which one of the normal 
schools is located. Mr. Webster finished the graded 
schools and for a time was a student in the normal school. 
He had his eye on the legal profession and entered the 
law department of Georgetown I'niversity at Washington, 
D. C, where he graduated. Upon the completion of his 
legal course he entered the employ of the New York Life 
Insurance Company. Mr. Welister re])resented his com- 
pany in Peoria, Illinois, for nearly seven years, three 
years being spent as district manager. He became agency 
director in Terre Haute in 1904. The company with its 
many different forms of pohcies and substantial fimnda- 
tion has met with favor here. Offices are maintained in 
the Rose Dispensary building. 

Mr. Webster believes the New York Life is the big.gcst 
company in every way and has good ijroof and argument 
willi which 1(1 back up his belief. 



CHARLES A. KELLEY 



A NV man wlio travels on an average (if four thousand 
■»*■ miles a month is obliged to do some tall hustling 
at times to catch trains. Mr. Kelley is seen here 
capturing the rear end of a vestibule for a trip into Mich- 
igan. Before the week is over it is hkely that he will have 
visited Grand Rapids, Big Rapids, Lansing, Gladstone and 
Red Jacket. In the winter time he has been in the upper 
Peninsula when the snow was just a little less than eight 
feet in depth. While adjusting fire losses, he is supposed 
to call on a few agents of the St. Paul Fire Insurance Com- 
pany and has little difficulty in keeping himself busy. 
He even sleeps and eats while traveling and is seldom 
guilty of eating his meals at home, 

Mr. Kelley came from vSullivan county to Tcrre Haute 
when he was seven years of age. He attended the high 
school for a time and then got busy. One of his first 
positions was with A. Herz & Company, where he was 
employed as a bookkeeper. Twenty-three years ago he 
entered into the fire insurance business, first being asso- 
ciated with B. F. Havens. Then he went into business 
for himself. For several years his partner was Nathaniel 
Allen, one of the best known of the older residents of 
Terre Haute. Five years ago Fred Wagner became a 
partner of Mr. Kelley. Nine fire insurance companies are 
repsesented by the firm and a large casualty business is 
also transacted. Mr. Kelley, as special agent and adjuster 
for the St. Paul Company, of St Paul, is out of the city 
most of the time, being in charge of two states, Michigan 
and Indiana. He covers a vast amount of territory in a 
year in making his rounds of agents and in adjusting 
losses. 

Mr. Kelley is a Mason, an Elk, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and is identified with the Young Business Men's 
Club and the Commercial Club. In politics he is a repub- 
lican but has never sought an olTice uf any kind. 





CHARLES A. MILLER 



DUFFON made liimself famous by declaring "Style is 
the man." If Buffon had been living in this stren- 
uous day and age he ])robal)ly would have changed 
liis mind. No man has such grace of form, gaiety of spirit 
and love of the l)cauliful that he can atTord to ignore the 
tailor. Mr. Miller will tell you that clothes have much 
to do with the style of the man and that it is really the 
style of the clothes that makes him good looking. To be 
frank about it, the tailor is ignored most when his bills are 
due. Conceding that men like to lie as well dressed as 
women, the ([uestion now arises, Who's your tailor' 

Mr, Miller is seen here displaying a piece of goods that 
will make up very well. By his long experience in tailor- 
ing, Mr. Miller is able to give you soiue good advice on the 
subject, and tit you out very well, making you as well 
dressed as any man you may lueet. The Miller name has 
been associated with the clothing and tailoring business 
in Terre Haute a goijd many years. No sooner had Mr. 
Miller left the high sclio(]l than he entered the store of his 
father, Mr. J. T. H. Miller, Mr. Miller and his brother, 
J. Harry Miller, became owners and ])artners in the present 
business in 1904. A branch establishment is conducted 
on Wabash avenue near Eighth street and is in charge of 
Harry Miller. Medium and high grade tailoring is the 
specialty of the firm and they cater to a large number of 
the best known men in the city 

Mr. Miller is ;in l'!lk, a Mason and a member of Uniform 
Rank, Com]>any No. .^. He enjoys base ball and is a 
lover of music. 



CHARLES A. KELLEY 



A XV man who travels on an average of four thousand 
•'*■ miles a month is obHged to do some tall hustling 
at times to catch trains. Mr. Kelley is seen here 
capturing the rear end of a vestibule for a trip into Mich- 
igan. Before the week is over it is likely that he will have 
visited Grand Rapids, Big Rapids, Lansing, Gladstone and 
Red Jacket. In the winter time he has been in the upper 
Peninsula when the snow was just a little less than eight 
feet in depth. While adjusting fire losses, he is supposed 
to call on a few agents of the St. Paul Fire Insurance Com- 
])any and has little difficulty in keeping himself busy. 
He even sleeps and eats while traveling and is seldom 
guilty of eating his meals at home. 

Mr. Kelley came from Sullivan county to Terre Haute 
when he was seven years of age. He attended the high 
school for a time and then got busy. ( )ne of his first 
positions was with A. Herz & Company, where he was 
employed as a bookkeeper. Twenty-three years ago he 
entered into the fire insurance business, first being asso- 
ciated with B. F. Havens. Then he went into business 
for himself. For several years his partner was Nathaniel 
Allen, one of the best known of the older residents of 
Terre Haute. Five years ago Fred Wagner became a 
partner of Mr. Kelley. Nine fire insurance comjjanies are 
repsesented by the firm and a large casualty business is 
also transacted. Mr. Kelley, as special agent and adjuster 
for the St. Paul Company, of St Paul, is out of the city 
most of the time, being in charge of two states, Michigan 
and Indiana. He covers a vast amount of territory in a 
year in making his rounds of agents and in adjusting 
losses. 

Mr. Kelley is a Mason, an Klk, a member of the Knights 
of Pythias and is identified with tlie Young Business Men's 
Club and the Commercial Club. In ])olitics he is a repub- 
lican but has never sought an office of any kind. 





CHARLES A. MILLER 



Dl^FFoX made liimself famous by declaring "Style is 
the man." If RutTon had Ijeen living in this stren- 
uous day and age he ])robal3ly would have changed 
his mind. Xo man has sucli grace of form, gaiety of spirit 
and love of the beautiful that lie can afford to ignore the 
tailor. Mr. Jliller will tell you tliat .clothes have much 
to do with the style of the man and tluit it is really the 
style of the clothes tliat makes him good looking. To be 
frank aljout it, the tailor is ignored most wlien his l)ills are 
due. Conceding that men like to be as well dressed as 
women, the c|uestion now arises. Who's your tailor!-' 

Mr. Jliller is seen here displaying a piece of goods that 
will make up very well. By his long experience in tailor- 
ing, Mr. Miller is al>le to give you some good advice on the 
subject, and fit you out very well, making you as well 
dressed as any man you may meet. The Miller name has 
been associated witli the clothing and tailoring business 
in Terre Haute a good many years. No sooner had Mr. 
Miller left the high school llian he entered the store of his 
father, Mr. |. T. H. Miller. Mr. Miller and his lirotlier, 
J. Harry Miller, Ijecame owners and ]iartners in the present 
business in 1904. .\ branch establishment is conducted 
on Wabash avenue near Kighth street and is in cliarge of 
Harry Miller. Medium and high grade tailoring is the 
specially of tlie tirni and they cater to a large number of 
tlie best known men in tlie city 

Mr. Miller is an Klk, a Mason and a mcmlier of Uniform 
Rank, Com])any Xo. .1. He enjoys liasc ball and is a 
lover of nuisic. 



FRANK B. MILLER 



|V yiR. MILLER is said to have made the remark once 
^'■l- that electricity is no joke, even if a lot of folks do 
make light of it. 

Frank is an electrician. He has lieen that way for a 
number of years and will probably never .get over it. He 
has helped to brighten as many homes and business 
houses in this community as any man could possibly do. 
Just as Ukely as not you were pushing one of Frank's 
electric bells when you made that call last eveinng; it is 
more than likely that the lights in the home were fixed 
there by him. 

Mr. Miller was born in Terre Haute in 1864 and isn't 
ashamed to admit it. He always had an ambition to 
learn something about electricity and has fitted himself 
especially for this line of work. He was a student in the 
electrical engineering department of the Rose Polytechnic 
for three and one-half years and studied electrical engin- 
eering two years at the Kansas State LTniversity. Upon 
the completion of his schooling he was associated with 
J. G. White of the Western Electrical Construction Com- 
pany. Next he was employed by the Edison Company, 
of Denver, Colorado, and was in that city three years. He 
was kept busy instaUing hghting plants in different 
parts of the west and had a hand in the building of the 
first overhead wire work for the Den\er Street Railway 
Company. 

Mr. Miller went into business for himself in Terre Haute 
in 1894 and has wired more large buildings than any other 
electrician in the city. The Root building, the Hulman 
building and Davis apartment house are some of the struc- 
tures that he has fitted up. Mr. Miller is an Elk and jolly 
good company. His greatest hobby a few years ago was 
canoeing. He has made the trip by water in a canoe 
several times from Lake Maxinkuckee, taking the Tippe- 
canoe and A\'abash rivers for his route. 





WILLIAM W. RAY 



r'ROM telegraph operator to coal operator was the step 
taken by William W. Ray when he quit the railroad 
business. However, there is a big difference between 
operating the telegraph key and a half dozen coal mines. 
Mr. Ray has been successful in doing both of these things. 
This is a very good likeness of Mr. Ray, and the shafts in 
the Ijackground give a hint of tlie industry that has done 
more than anything else to make Terre Haute "The Pitts- 
burg of the West." 

Mr. Ray was born at Camliridge City, Indiana, and 
began to learn telegraphy in tlie office of the Pennsylvania 
lines in tliat cily. He held his first position on the Rich- 
mond division of tlie road and in 1880 accepted a position 
with the Vandalia company at St. Louis. The following 
year he came to Terre Haute and became a dispatcher in 
the offices of the company. He was chief dispatcher from 
1894 to 1900. Then he switched into the commercial 
world, first organizing the Seelyville Coal and Mine Com- 
pany, being president of that concern. He is president of 
fifteen companies which are engaged in the mining of coal, 
jobbing, and retail business. Eight mines arc owned by 
these companies and they have a total i)Ul]nit of nearly 
seven thousand tons a day. Numerous large railroad 
contracts have been entered into and the volume of busi- 
ness amounts to aljout one million and a half dollars a 
year. The sum of 560,000 is paid out each month for 
labor alone. Fifteen hundred men are given employment 
in the immediate locahty of Terre Haute. 

It can be truthfully said that Mr. Ray's greatest 
hobby is his business and he enjoys himself best when he 
is engaged in looking after the affairs of the num'erous 
companies. He is a Knight Templar. 



FRANK B. MILLER 



IV yiR. MILLER is said tu have made the remark once 
^"■'- that electricity is no juke, even if a lot of folks do 
make light of it. 

Frank is an electrician. He has been that wav for a 
number of years and will probably never get over it. He 
has helped to brighten as many homes and business 
houses in this community as any man could possibly do. 
Just as likely as not you were pushing one of Frank's 
electric bells when you made that call last eveinng; it is 
more than likely that the lights in the home were fixed 
there by him. 

Mr. Miller was born in Terre Haute in 1864 and isn't 
ashamed to admit it. He always had an amljition to 
learn something about electricity and has fitted himself 
especially for this line of work. He was a student in the 
electrical engineering department of the Rose Polytechnic 
for three and one-half years and studied electrical engin- 
eering two years at the Kansas State L'niversity. Upon 
the completion of his schooling he was associated with 
J. G. White of the Western Electrical Construction Com- 
pany. Xext he was employed by the Edison Company, 
of Denver, Colorado, and was in that city three years. He 
was kept busy installing lighting plants in different 
parts of the west and had a hand in the building of the 
first overhead wire work for the Denver Street Railway 
Company. 

Mr. Miller went into business for himself in Terre Haute 
in 1894 and has wired more large buildings than any other 
electrician in the city. The Root building, the Hulman 
building and Davis apartment house are some of the struc- 
tures that he has fitted up. Mr. Miller is an Elk and jolly 
good company. His greatest hobby a few years ago was 
canoeing. He has made the trip by water in a canoe 
several times from Lake Maxinkuckee, taking the Tippe- 
canoe and Wabash rivers for his route. 





WILLIAM W. RAY 



'T'ROM telegraph operator to coal operator was the step 
taken by William W. Ray when he quit the railroad 
business. However, there is a big difference Ijctween 
operating the telegraph key and a half do/cn coal mines. 
Mr. Ray has been successful in doing both of these things. 
This is a very good likeness of Mr. Ray, and the shafts in 
the background give a hint of the industry that lias done 
more llian anytliing else to make Terre Haute "The Pitts- 
burg (jf the West." 

Mr. Ray was born at Cambridge City, Indiana, and 
began to learn telegra])hy in the oHice of the Pennsylvania 
lines in that city. He licld his first position on the Rich- 
mond division of the road and in 1880 accepted a position 
with the X'andalia company at St. Louis. The following 
year he came to Terre Haute and l)ecanie a dispatcher in 
the offices of the company. He was chief dispatcher from 
1894 to 1900. Then he switched into the commercial 
world, first organizing the Seelyville Coal and Mine Com- 
pany, being president of that concern. He is president of 
fifteen companies which are engaged in the mining of coal 
joliljing, and retail business. Eiglit mines are owned by 
these coniiKinies and they have a total out]iut of nearlv 
seven thousand terns a day. Numerous large railro; 
contracts have lieen entered into and the volume of bu 
ness amounts to about one millicm and a half dollars a 
year. The sum of S60,000 is paid out each month for 
labor alone. Fifteen hundred men are given em])loyment 
in the immediate locality of Terre Haute. 

It can be truthfully said that Mr. Ray's greatest 
hobby is his business and he enjoys himself best when he 
is engaged in looking after the affairs of the numerous 
companies. He is a Knight Templar. 



JACOB R. FINKELSTEIN 



T^HERE are too many Americans who toil not, neither 
■'■ do they spin. Tliey would be willing for some one 
to hand them a good thing, but would object to 
steering a large pair of steel gray mules from day to day, 
or engaging in any labor that would jiroduce a real good 
sweat. Perspiration and prosperity go hand in hand. 
This, Mr. Finkelstein has found out. Mr. Finkelstein is a 
"wrecker" at times. W'c have him photographed here 
holding a ten-tim boiler with comparative ease. The 
results of his labor are seen scattered about in every direc- 
tion. He is wiUing to toil that he may spin, and enjoys 
a spin C|uite often in his automobile. 

Mr. Finkelstein is a native of Creston, Iowa, and arrived 
on Christmas day in 1879. This was rather a convenient 
arrangement as he never has to lose any time celebrating 
his birthday. After one year in Iowa, tiring of the dull 
monotony of the landscape, he nmved with liis parents to 
Brazil. This has been about the only mistake Mr. 
Finkelstein has been guilty of. He never realized that it 
was time to move until 1900 when he eame to Terre Haute 
and entered into the second-hand machinery business. 
He is secretary and general manager of the A. Greenberg 
Iron and Rail Company. Some very large contracts have 
been entered into by the firm and tlieir business amounts 
to thousands of dollars annually. At jiresent, the com- 
pany is supplying tlie Snuthern Indiana Railroad Com- 
pany with steel culverts for its two new divisions running 
to Chicago and Indianapolis. The company deals in new 
and second-hand machinery of every description, handling 
pumps, engines, Ijoilers, shafting, pulleys, belting, ete. 

Mr. Finkelstein is a Mason, a member of the Commercial 
Club, the Phoenix Club and the Marion and Columbia 
Clubs of Indianapolis. 







Hill. 




WILLARD A. CALDWELL 



■yVT'ATER bills are as certain as death. Hence the 
"owed" to "Bill" When all is said, the water 
works company furnishes a very healthful commod- 
ity, and coni])aratively few ]ico]>le oliject to .i;i\ in^ Mr. Cald- 
well their money in exchange for this great necessity. 
There is some satisfaction in paying your money to a 
cheerful person, and Mr. Caldwell possesses this great 
virtue. After getting a receipt from him you feel like 
paying the bill right over again. 

The secretary of the Terre Haute A\'ater Works Com- 
pany is a Hoosier and ])roud of it. He was Ijorn at 
Lebanon, Boone countv, in 1871. He began his Ijusiness 
career as a shorthand repi->rter but found the life too 
strenuous and began looking for something that would 
afford him greater variety. He accepted a position in 
1893 with a prominent firm of contractors engaged in ex- 
ecuting a big part of the work on the Chicago drainage 
canal. He held a position that gave him a s])lendid 
prestige, that of paymaster. He was always welcome, 
especially on pay days. Part of the time during the 
building of the big ditch he was in the otfice and also had 
charge of the o])erating dc])artment. In January, 1900, 
he severed his connection with tlic contracting firm and 
came to Terre Haute as secretary of the local water 
company. He is still serving in tliis capacity and has 
made a large nnmlier of friends as a consequence of 
» coming in contact with so many people. 



JOHN C. VAUGHAN 



IV /IR. ^•ArGHA^■ is a f.ie to old age and insomnia. He 
is just as willinc; to pull a tooth as to replace a new 
one in your jaw. He is equipped for either emer- 
gency. If you have too much nerve, he will destroy it, 
but as a rule there is an apparent lack of nerve indicated 
by the man who has lain awake for six nights suffering 
with the toothache. He will go to the dentist when some 
friend agrees to go witli him and usually experiences more 
suflFering in the anticipation of the operation than when 
it is actually performed. 

If Dr. \'aughan could have had his own way about it he 
would have preferred to call Terre Haute his birthplace. 
He came to light in Pomeroy, ( )hio, the town that is built 
for seven miles along the liluft's of the ( )hio. He hastened 
from Pomeroy just as soon as he was able to travel and 
came to Terre Haute. He has been here practically all 
of his life. His amliition to l)ecome a dentist cropped out 
very early and he secured a position in the ollice of Dr. 
W. R. Mail. He ran errands and polished jjlates until he 
was entrusted with more important things and entered 
the Indiana Dental College at Indianapolis in 1893, grad- 
uating in 1896. Upon his return home he was associated 
with Dr. Mail four years longer and then opened an office 
for himself. Dr. \'aughan has formed a partnership with 
Dr. Mail again and will assist in taking care of a large 
practice. 

The doctor's greatest hobby is football. He gladlv 
would miss a meal to see a tirst class game. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Pythias, I'niform Rank Companv 
No. 3, and of the Foresters. 





W. ROBERT PAIGE 



TK order not to confuse Mr. Paige with the man who 
■'• "engineers" a prize fight or promotes a clever ]iohtical 
deal, we will begin by stating that he is a civil engineer. 
There is perhaps no older and more useful profession, and 
really no one knows who was the first great engineer. 
Ancient Rome claims the attention of the engineering 
student because its theatres, temples, aqueducts, brigdes, 
roads and drainiage-works were as good as those of modern 
times. Now the modern civil engineer is giving his atten- 
tion to interurban railways, telephone and telegraph lines, 
and a dozen and one things that the old Romans never 
dreamed of, though we admit they were smart folks. 
There is evidently no termination to the usefulness and 
necessity of the engineering profession. 

Mr. Pai.ge had engineering in view from the time he was 
a small boy. He sijent three years in the high school and 
then attended our own Polytechnic, graduating from the 
splendid institution in IS'M. His first engineering and 
surveying was done at Evansvillle where lie remained 
several months. Returning to Terre Haute, Mr. Pai.ge 
was in the employ of the city in the engineering depart- 
ment for several years. He was elected county surveyor 
in 1900, serving four years, part of that time acting also 
as county engineer. When Terre Haute decided on a 
belt sewer, the biggest piece of sanitary work ever ]ier- 
formed here, Mr. Paige was the man in charge of the con- 
structiim. 

In 1904 Mr. Paige was the chief engineer ft)r a company 
in Mississippi that built forty-five miles of interurban 
railway. He was very successful in carrying on this work 
and as a conseciuence feels rather pround of his part of 
the job in connecting the cities of \'icksburg and Jackson 

The first of the year, on his return to Terre Haute. Mr. 
Paige opened his oflficcs in the new .\rcade building. 



CHARLES J. KINTZ 



A S an art, building is of vast antic|uity, and has assumed 
(lifTcrent forms, according to the necessities of man- 
kind and the material available. Here is a con- 
tractor \vlio is acting as liis own Iniilder just for a minute. 
To insure that his plans will be carried out, and liaving 
some professional pride in the job, Mr. Kintz is demon- 
strating his abitily to build as well as to contract. The 
business of contracting, however, is to be ])referred, as it 
is much lighter work. Barring the interference of a walk- 
ing delegate, Mr. Kintz looks as though he would l>e able 
to complete his task in good style. 

While yet a small boy, Mr. Kintz would take nails from 
his father's workshop and drive them in all kinds <if im- 
aginable places. This indicated t<] some extent his inclina- 
tion, and liis father, P. C. Kintz, ha\ing been in the con- 
tracting business, gave the son a chance to learn more 
aliout nail driving when he was sixteen years of age. From 
that time on Mr. Kintz has been keeping busy in his pro- 
fession. He is enthusiastic for the growth (jf Terre Haute 
and his ])leasure is heightened every time tliat he com- 
pletes a nice modern residence or a store building. 

Mr. Kintz is secretary and manager of the Vigo Lumlier 
Com]iany which was recently organized and with special 
facihties is able to carry out contracts and orders promptly. 
As a member of the Elks lodge, the Young Men's Institute 
and the Knights of Columbus, Mr. Kintz has a wide 
acquaintance. He is a baseball and polo fan and enjoys 
outdoor sports very much. 





CHAPMAN J. ROOT 



X TATURALl.V every man is interested more deeply in 
•'■ ' the particular line of liusiness that he is engaged in 
than anything else. Wltile Mr. Root is displaying 
some of the ware from his plant in the south part of the 
city, the difference in sizes convey some idea of how the 
plant has grown since it was established in the fertile in- 
dustrial soil of Terre Haute. The glass industry has grown 
to big proportions here, and Mr. Root is one of the men 
who has helped matters along. 

If you ever travel in the northeast part of Pennsylvania, 
especially in Wayne county, you are likely lo liear of the 
Root family. Tliey took a ])retty firm liold on the soil 
in that part of the country and for a numlicr of years were 
engaged in the lumbering business, helping; to make that 
heavily wooded part of the coimtry habitalile. Mr. Root 
was born at Homesdale, but left there to accompany his 
]5arents to Portage coimty, Ohio, when he was three years 
of age. He located at Ravenna, and after leaving school 
started to learn the machinist trade in his father's sho]) 
but shortly afterwards went into the glass business. He 
first engaged in the manufacturing business at Ravenna. 
Then Mr. Root assisted in organizing the Cream City Glass 
Company at Milwaukee, being manager of the ])lant. Mr. 
Root came to Terre Haute in 1900. He organized the 
Root Glass Company in I'Mll. As president of the com- 
pany he has been instriunental in tripling the capacity of 
the factory, three furnaces now Ijeing in operation giving 
employment in all, to over six hundred ])ersons. The 
product of the local plant goes to all jiarts of the country, 
Cuba and Mexico. 

Beer and soda bottles are made exclusively and Terre 
Haute is being well advertised by at least one industry — 
the Root factory. 



ALBERT D. PENDLETON 



IT is a well-established fact that railmads cannot depend 
on the passenger traffic alone to keep (hiiij;s moving. 
It is really the freight that's moving which counts for 
a great deal when it comes to meeting operating expenses. 
To get the freight requires the services of several very 
good hustlers, and Mr. Pendleton belongs to this class. 
He is the division freight agent in charge of the main line, 
Peoira and Vincennes divisions of the Vandalia system. 
We have caught him at the Vandalia station in Illinois. 
From this town the Vandalia railroad got its name. It is 
very likely that the depot agent at this point has just re- 
ceived some instructions regarding freight and rates. In a 
few hours Mr. Pendleton may be chatting with the agent at 
Effingham. There are "softer" jobs than being a division 
freight agent, but like all other men who have grown up 
in the railroad business, Mr. Pendleton likes the life. 

Mr. Pendleton is a Maine man. He was born in that 
state in the little town of Yarmoulli, where ^n main- I'isli 
stories used to be manufactured and sent out to the "land 
lubbers." When he came to the great middle west he 
located at Indianapolis. As a boy be became a messenger 
in the service of several railroads at Indianapolis. His 
first position was with the Vandalia in the freight depart- 
ment. He was promoted through the different depart- 
ments until he became division freight agent at Indian- 
apolis. Two years ago Terre Haute was made his head- 
quarters. 

In the short time that he has been here Mr. Pendletim 
has procured a wide acquaintance among the shippers and 
other business men. He is a Scottish Rite Mason and a 
Shriner and also belongs to the order of " Hoo-Hoos." He 
is a lover of the light harness horse and enjoys fishing and 
hunting, but as a division freight agent is usually a very 
busy man. He has little time in wliicli lo indulge in his 
hobbies. 





JOHN S. COX 



npERRE HAUTE was never content to occupy a back 
seat and has always ulijected to trailing at the rear 
of the procession. We have had the best races, the 
fastest horses, the lii,t;,t;est distilleries, the most eloquent 
preachers, and the most distintjuished politicians and 
statesmen in our midst. A few years ago there were but 
three automobiles in the town. Now we have over sixty, 
which is a better showing than almost any other city of 
Terre Haute's size in the country can make. Mr. Cox is 
one of the men mainly resiionsible for such a condition of 
affairs in the automobile line. He owned one of the first 
machines and has been inducing other people to own them 
for the past three years. 

Mr. Cox is essentially a Terre Haute jiroduct. He is 
a graduate of the high school and received a diploma from 
the Rose Polytechnic in l.S')l. His technical education 
fitted him very well to become the superintendent of the 
Terre Haute Car Manufacturing Company, which position 
he filled from 1891 to 1892. When this big plant was 
sold, Mr. Cox turned his attention to autos. He organized 
the Terre Haute Automobile Company in 1903 and is 
president and general manager. The garage on Seventh 
street is one of the largest in the middle west. The com- 
pany is the agent for the Packard in Central Indiana and 
Mr. Cox never neglects to say a good word for the Packard, 
as he owns one himself. Mr. Cox holds the local auto 
record from Brazil to Terre Haute, having made the trip 
from the Davis house in Brazil to the local garage in thirty- 
two minutes. The distance is sixteen and one-eighth 
miles. When the Terre Haute Automobile Club was 
organized recently, Mr. Cox was elected as its jiresident. 



JAMES J. PAGAN 



■ I 'HE man in the picture liustling the freight end of the 
Evansville and Terre Haute and the Chicago and 
Eastern Illinois is James F. Fagan, who not so 
many years ago was carrying messages as a Imy to and 
from the freight offices at Tenth street and Wabash avenue. 
James still retains his youthfulness but he has jirogressed 
beyond the carrying of messages and is now the commercial 
agent of the two roads named. 

By liirth .Mr. Fagan is a Terre Hautean. He attended 
St. Joseph's school and ])rogressed so far as the iunior 
year in the high school, when the screech of the freight 
engine called him into the business. Mr. Fagan began 
as a messenger under J. R. Connelly who was then general 
agent of the Evansville and Terre Haute and the Chicago 
and Eastern Illinois. Fmni ihat time on the youthful 
railroad man filled every [io?itiim at the freight house 
until he received his present appointment as commercial 
agent April 1, 1905. First Mr. Fagan was seal clerk, then 
yardmaster's clerk, bill clerk, chief bill clerk, train desk 
clerk, checked rates and bills, hcljied out in the car service 
department, skirmished around and solicited business, 
and then was given just what he had been working for — 
his present position. 

This is what husthng accomjilishes, and Mr. F'agan has 
made a wide circle of friends by his pleasant business 
methods. The position he holds is a very responsbile one 
and is one of the middle niunds in the ladder that leads 
to a successful railroad career. He is a memljer of the 
Young Men's Institute and recently liecame a memljer of 
the Young Business Men's Club. 





GEORGE J. NATTKEMPER 



WITH old King Coal reigning supreme in this particular 
section it has atTorded openings for an army of 
hustling young men who see to it that the product 
is jiretty well scattered over tlie country. It is im])ossible 
for Terre Haute to consume all of the coal, though we 
admit that tlie town has been a warm proposition until 
cooled by recent events. Mr. Nattkemper for several 
years was engaged in railroad work, that is one reason 
why we have associated him with the brake at the rear 
of the coal train w'hich is slowly crawling on its way to 
Chicago. It might be proper to add that brake-twisting 
was not Mr. Nattkemper's specialty. It was his duty to 
see that the cars handled liy his coni|ianies were always 
loaded. 

Mr. Xattkemper grew up in Riley. When he wasn't in 
school he was at the depot. Eventually he mastered 
telegraphy, and the Evansville and Terre Haute railroad 
finally appointed him agent and operator. He filled the 
position very creditably and w'as given a place in the olTice 
of the genearl agent of the Chicago and Eastern lUinois 
in Terre Haute. In 1896 he was appointed traveling 
freight agent. He continued in the last named position 
until January, 1904, when he engaged in the wholesale and 
retail coal business witli John F. Murphy. The first of 
the present year Mr. Murphy retired from the firm and 
Mr. John R. Connelly, who had been formerly associated 
with Mr. Nattkemper in railroad work, became a partner. 
The firm is sales agent for the Soutliern Indiana Coal 
Company which operates nine different mines in this 
locality and does an extensive Inisiness. 

Mr. Nattkemper is an Elk, a member of the Knights of 
Pythias, the Masons and the Young Business Men's Club. 
He is the happy fatlier of a son and daughter. He was 
married to Miss Nora Wallace of Terre Haute, in Novem- 
ber, 1894. 



CHARLES PATTON 



PVER since the time of Hippocrates tlie physicians and 
surgeons have been accused of enjoying the art of 
cutting people into small sections, sawing off legs 
and arms, reducing dislocations and setting fractures. 
Hippocrates was criticised a great deal for being some- 
what clumsy in his work and even the modern surgeon is 
looked upon as a man to he feared, especially by the indi- 
vidual who has a pain in his side and imagines that appen- 
dicitis has him in its grasp. With one stroke of the knife 
Dr. Fatten could give us a sectional view of the eye and 
no doubt deliver an interesting little talk on ophthal- 
mology. By so doing he would throw some light on the 
optic nerve which conveys the impression to the sensorium. 
With the increase of knowledge, specialties naturally 
develop themselves and such has been the case in medicine 
and surgery. When Dr. Patton started out he concluded 
that he would rather know a good deal about a few things 
than know little about a great many things. Dr. Patton 
was born in Rome — not the eternal city — but Rome, 
Indiana. He was reared between the corn rows of a farm 
in Washington county until he was twenty-one years old, 
and then decided to follow the profession adopted by his 
father. He attended the Louisville Meidcal College and 
the Kentucky School of Medicine, and later went to \e\v 
York City where he studied for some time. He practiced 
in Southern Indiana and in Iowa before locating in Terre 
Haute six years ago. The doctor has specialized in tlie 
treatment of the eye, ear, nose and throat. He is a Fellow 
of the American Academy of Ophthalmology and Oto- 
Laryngology, a member of the State Medical Association 
and the Aesculapian Society. 





SAMUEL T. GREENBERG 



T T K R 1{ we see Mr. Greenberg as he a])peared at the last 
enterlaininent given l>y the Wabash Cycling Clul) 
in tlie role nf a nKinolngue artist. .Some one has 
said tliat tliere are 6,0(111 vaudeville i)erfiirnicrs in the 
I'nited Stales. ( )!' this niunlx-r Ijut 600 acts in vaudeville 
are classed as being good. .\11 of the rest are merely 
"fillers." Terre Haute has more good talent to the 
square inch than any otlier town of its size in the country. 
It lias provided the vaudeville sta.ge with some good per- 
formers. Mr. Greenberg would have done well as a mon- 
ologist but he has preferred tlie life of a Inisiness man 
where three good meals a f'ay are always secured. 

Mr. Greenberg was " jnit oil" at HulTalo shortly after 
tlie P'ourtli of July in bS7o. He moved afterward to 
Detroit, tlicnce to Indianaiiolis and then to the best town 
on earth, Terre Haute. Here his friends stand for his 
monologue stunts and jokes and he finds life altogether 
desirable. Mr. Greenlierg cannot repress a smile even 
yet, when he tliinks of liis first position. It was in a 
feather foundry. In other words, he assisted for the 
short s|)ace of one week in removing feathers. The job 
was not to his liking and lie then went into the clothing 
business. For fourteen years he helped to dress Terre 
Hauteans over tlie counters of the Thornian & Schloss 
clothing store. He next became a member of the llrm 
of the A. L. G;cenber,g Iron and Railway Com]umy, which 
dues an extensive business in Terre Haute and locality. 

For a good many years Mr. Greenberg has been one of 
the most active members of the Wabash Cycling Club and 
has always tctken a directing hand in the amateur enter- 
lainnienls given by tlie club. In 1004 he was ])iesident 
of the club. 



CHARLES F. GROSJEAN 



"YY/HEN you were a small boy in McGiilTey's Third 
"' reader and the teacher coni]iclled you to stand in 
the corner the rest of the afternoon just because 
you made those goo-goo eyes, or lilew a few paper wads 
against the ceiling, my, how you wished there was a way 
— any way — to get even with that schoolm'am. Oh! if 
you had only been in the place which this man Grosjean 
occupies. For, just think, he is the boss of about 160 
teachers in Vigo county. He's the superintendent of the 
county schools, and they do as he wants them to, provided, 
of course, that their wishes coincide with his. 

The quality and cjuantity of the output of the rural 
schools has kept up to the standard since Mr. Grosjean 
took his official position. Mr. Grosjean was born in Terre 
Haute forty-two years ago. He completed his Normal 
School work in 1882 and almost immediately went to 
teaching. He taught first in Honey Creek township and 
then in several other graded schools before he was elected 
county superintendent in 1889. He served one term of 
two years when the political complexion of affairs chan.tjed 
consideraljly and a democratic successor was put in the 
office. For one year he was principal of the Seventeenth 
district school resigning to go into the abstract business 
with Edward Gobin. The partnership was continued five 
years. In 1887 Mr. Grosjean was re-elected to his present 
position. 

The standard of the \'igo county schools is very high 
and the thorough preparation of all teachers in the rural 
districts is insisted upon by Mr. Grosjean. Conduct of reci- 
tations and discipline also receive the close attention of the 
superintendent. \'i,go county was the first in the state 
to establish an educational qualificali(jn for its teachers 
w'hich gives some idea of the efficiencv of the svstem. 





ELMER C. RHOADS 



IV /IR. RHOADS is an authority on kid shoes and knows 
something about the kind of shoes that older per- 
sons should wear. There is really nothing so im- 
portant Lifter all as shoes that fit and look well. Half the 
wrinkles in the world are caused by ill fitting shoes that 
hurt the feet. Mr. Rhoads will tell you that it is a ques- 
tion of getting fitted ]iroperly. Kids and fits, then, 
naturally go together. 

Mr. Rhoads is C|ualified for his position in the liusiness 
world of Terre Haute by a lifetime experience in selling 
shoes. He came to liglil in Hillsboro, Illinois, and after 
finishing his studies in the pulilic schools went into the 
shoe business with his father. For some time Mr. Rhoads 
was associated with his father at Alton, Illinois, and when 
Mr. C. H. Rhoads and Mr. W. N. Carhart opened a store 
in Terre Haute, Mr. Rhoads, Jr., came along as a salesman. 
He has never had cause to regret coming to such a good 
town. Vpon tlie death of his father, Mr. Rhoads became 
a partner with Mr. Carhart in tlie local store and another 
change took pliice in the ownershi]) ii])on the death of Mr. 
Carhart. July first, Mr. Rhoads succedcd the firm of 
Rhoads & Carhart and is manager and owner of the ])resent 
store. An excellent trade has been established since the 
opening of the store and a good medium class of customers 
is catered to, although the best of fine footwear is carried 
to satisfy the needs of all customers. 

Mr. Rhoads is one of the best known younger Ijusiness 
men of the town. He is a member of the Young Business 
Men's Club, the Wabash Cycling Club, the Knights of 
Pvthias and tlic Elks. 



CHARLES W. ABBOTT 



THE walls of a house may be built of wood, stone, brick, 
brick and timber, iron, mud, turf and even snow. 
In the Arctic regions a house with snow walls is felt 
to be fairly comfortable. In the tropics a strong tent, 
constructed of posts and palm leaves suffice for an abode. 
The first houses in Terre Haute were built of logs and some 
of the larger edifices, even when constructed of brick later 
on, were crude looking. In eighty-eight years, time has 
worked a wonderful transition. Terre Haute now con- 
tains an unusually large number of elegant homes and 
fine looking buildings. 

Mr. Abbott, whom we see in the picture, has a reason 
for feeling "stuck up." Wouldn't you, too, if you had 
built a magnificent structure like this? He has certainly 
done his share toward beautifying Terre Haute with hand- 
some buildings. We will pardon him for the pride he has 
evidenced in the construction of St. Benedict's church, for 
it is easily one of the finest churches in the middle west. 
As a contractor and builder, this church will stand for 
many years a monument to the ability of Mr. Abbott. 
The structure is built of brown stone and marble and when 
furnished represented an outlay of S200,000. Mr. Abbott 
is a Buckeye by birth, having been born at Cincinnati. 
He began learning the trade of bricklaying in the Ohio 
city, and came here when he was sixteen years of age. 
He has been in the contracting business ever since that 
time and has handled a number of big jobs. He is prac- 
tical in every sense of the term and knows when good work 
is being done 

Mr. Abbott's greatest hobby is boating on the historic 
Wabash. He is the owner of the steamer "Anyone" and 
enjoys frequent trips with his friends during the season 
up and down the most beautiful banks of the river. He is 
a Knight Templar and a member of the Travelers' Pro- 
tective Association. 








CAMILLE A. URBAN 



IV /IR. I'RBAX is mil greatly given to crowing over any- 
thing tlial he achieves but his "over-all" sweep in 
the Central Roller Polo League is still remembered 
by the fans who saw the Danville team play at the Coli- 
seum last season. We will give Mr. Urban credit for 
having a very good team and we still regret that we didn't 
get the Ijig Frenchman. Polo is aliout the fastest game 
in tile world, and Mr. Urban is a great admirer of the si)ort. 
He was so enthusiastic over it that he dug down into his 
overalls an:l fished up enough mcjney to liecome one of 
the ])rincipal stockholders of the Danville learn, and is 
ready for another wliirl at the game. 

Mr. Urban was liorn in Illinois, i>ul he left there at such 
a tender age that he has grown up under Hoosier influences 
and yiiu can now find no trace of his ever having been a 
sucker. He received his edcuation in the graded schools, 
the high school and attended Connnercial College. His 
first position was in the office of Zimmerman & Stahl, 
makers of men's garments. He has remained in this busi- 
ness from the start and became a jiartner with Mr. Stahs 
in 1894. Working men's clothing of all kinds is made l.iy 
Messrs. Stahl & Urban and they give employment to 
three hundred jiersons here, besides having a branch fac- 
tory in Danville, Illinois, which employs one hundred 
and fifty people. The product of these factories finds a 
ready sale in all parts of the United States and does much 
to advertise Terre Haute. Tlie Danville liranch \\as 
established in 1890. 

Mr. Urban's hobliies are polo and autoraobiling. He is 
a member of the antlered herd here, No. 86, and is also a 
member of the Travelers Protective Association. 



GEORGE MAIER 



IV yiAXV things have contributed to Terre Haute's fame, 
'■^ '^ but if you -were to ask any one who has ever tasted 
of the product of the Terre Haute Brewing Com- 
pany as to what he considers the biggest institution in the 
town he would probably reply that the brewery impressed 
him a good deal. Laying all jokes aside, this is true. Xo 
wonder, though, when you think seriously for a minute. 
The product of the Terre Haute Brewing Company is 
found in every hamlet, town and city in this part of the 
country and even if you should land in some city a good 
many hundred miles away the chances are that you could 
be provided with a drink of "\'elvet" if you were real 
thirsty and had the price. 

As secretary of the Terre Haute Brewing Company, 
Mr. Maier has had his part in the development of an an- 
dustry that gives employment to a large number of men 
and advertises Terre Haute quite thoroughly. Thou- 
sands of dollars are paid out annually for raw material. 
With keen competition the local company has made its 
way, growing larger each year. 

Mokena, Illinois, is the birthplace of Mr. Maier. He 
came to Terre Haute when he was seven years of age. He 
tried several different lines of work before he fell into the 
niche which he fitted. He "deviled" in the printers' 
trade, worked in a grocery and even started to learn the 
painter's trade. He became secretary of the Terre Haute 
Distilling Company in 1886 and accepted his present 
position in 1892. As secretary of the brewing company 
Mr. Maier fills a position of great responsibility. The 
volume of business now amounts to over two millions of 
dollars a year. 

Mr. Maier has tackled golf on the links of the Country 
Club, but his favorite sport is fishing. Usually, once a 
year he finds time to hie himself away to some northern 
lake resort where he enjoys angling after bass and other 
game fish. Mr. Maier is a member of the antlered herd. 
No. 86, and is also a Mason. 








AUSTIN R. NORRIS 



IV yiR. NORRIS, whom we see here, comes from the 
strongliiild of In<liaiia democracy — Sliel1)yvillc. He 
was iKirii in the county of barbecues in 1871, on a 
farm, but ilid not remain there long enough to learn much 
about feeding stock or "ijailing" cows. He was seven 
years of age when lie landed in Terre Haute. 

He has lieen in the grocery business jiraclically all of 
his life and has become firmly wedded to it. He did not 
consume mucli time in ])rocuring an education Init early 
began hustling. His first work was on a delivery wagon 
and he "made good" with his em])loyer because lie always 
delivered the meal in time for dinner. After serving his 
apprenticeship on the wagon he was employed on the 
inside, where he gave gratis a smile with every order, no 
matter if it was only a ]iound of sugar. Tliis won Air. 
Norris a good niaiiv friends. He was employed for eleven 
years as a grocery clerk in the building in which he is now 
located. Then he decided to go into business for himself, 
making the venture five years ago. Mr. Xorris has fully 
deserved the success he has met with. It's mostly work 
and no play in the grocery business and Mr. Xorris has 
fully realized this. He is busy all of llie lime. 

Mr. Xorris has always thrown liis inlluence in the direc- 
tion of those things wliicli go t(] the making of a lietter 
Terre Haute. He is a member of the Voung Business 
Men's Club. He is a great lover of base ball and ]xilo and 
always "roots" for the Hottentot aggre.gatiim. 



WILLIAM E. M'KEEVER 



(< A M I ever asked any foolish (|uestions? Well, I 

^^ should hasten to say that I am," was the reply 
of Mr. McKeever the other day. "The best one 
ever asked me" he continued, "was by an old farmer 
about two weeks ago. Vou know I have lieen here a good 
many years selling tickets for the roads that enter this 
station, but this 'took the bake shop' above all others. 
I was unusually busy and a long hne of prospective ticket 
buyers waited their turn. Among them was an old man 
who patiently kept his place. I could tell that he was a 
farmer. I had just finished selling a ticket to Kokomo 
when the old man reached the window. He hesitated a 
minute and then he said: 

"'How much will it cost me to send a half bushel of 
potatoes to Linton?' 

"It was really pathetic, but I couldn't help it. I re- 
strained myself as much as possible and told him that we 
handled neither freight or express. He probalily came 
from some small town where the station agent combines 
about six positions." 

Mr. MeKeever, whose genial and Ijenevolent looking 
countenance we present here, was born in tlie city of 
Terre Haute in 1858. As soon as he was out of school he 
accepted a position with the Vandalia railroad as a mes- 
senger boy. This was in 1873. He was first located at 
the old depot. Tenth and Chestnut streets. Since that 
time he has filled responsible places in the auditor's office, 
treasurer's office, the freight office at East St. Louis and 
in the local freight department. He was appointed to 
his present position three years ago. The first ticket that 
Mr. McKeever sold when he assumed his new position 
was one to Macksville. The fare is seven cents and rep- 
resents the smallest amount of money accepted by the 
Vandalia for one of its tickets. It is unnecessary to say 
that Mr. McKeever is one of the most popular ticket 
agents that the Union depot ever had. 




THE 
[P/-AC 




GEORGE W. PARIS 



MR. Paris affords another example of the young man, 
who, under adverse circuitistances, may make his 
own way and finally reach a ])lace of honor and 
influence in the worlld. 

f)n a farm near Rensselaer, in jasjier county, Mr. Paris 
was born in 1854. As a boy he worked and went to 
school by turns until he was eighteen years of age. In the 
fall of 1872 he entered the old Asbury University, now 
DePauw, at Greencastle, and was graduated from that 
institution with his class in 1877. The college class of 
that year was one of the largest and perhaps the ablest 
ever sent forth from the halls of DePauw. Mr. Paris had 
worked his way tlirough the school and appreciated his 
training all the more. He had already chosen law as his 
profession and began his law studies almost immediately. 
He was admitted to the bar in Greencastle but after his 
graduation entered the law office of Claypool & Ketcham 
at IndianapoHs. Two years he spent in Colorado whence 
he had accompanied Mrs. Paris, who sought the Colorado 
chmate on account of impaired health. He returned to 
Terre Haute in 1880, forming a partnership with Samuel 
R. Hamill. Always interested in politics, Mr. Paris 
served as county chairman of his party for four years. 
He was county attorney in 1891, this being his first public 
position. In 1894 he was nominated as the candidate 
for congress and after a hard campaign was elected with 
a majority of 2,569 votes. He Was re-elected in 1896 and 
in 1898. During his congressional career Mr. Paris served 
on a number of important committees, among them the 
Pacific Railroads, manufacturers, and elections. 

He has met with a large degree i>f success in his pro- 
fession and is one of Terre Haute's best known citizens, 
Mr. Paris is active in the promotion of social interests and 
religious work, lieing a mcnilier of the Methodist li]>iscoiial 
church. 



JOHN NELSON WHITE 



1\ /IK. \\"HITE, betlur known as "Ca])tuin," was inducted 
•^ ''••■ into the joys and tribulations of this world at Bain- 
bridge, Ross county, Ohio. Ohio is a good state 
to come from but Indiana is a much better state to live 
in, so Mr. White moved to Terre Haute in 1857. This is 
one move in his life that he has never regretted. Captain 
White has made himself very useful as a citizen and his 
usefulness was greatly increased when Mayor Bidaman 
came into office. In looking about for a man who would 
make a good member of the board of public works the 
mayor selected Mr. Wliite. We have produced a good 
likeness here of the secretary of the board. When not 
busy making out vouchers he is seeing that the minutes 
of the meetings are properly entered in the secretary's 
book. 

Captain White has never been afraid of work, so wlien 
the position was tendered him he accepted it. He knows 
just what it means to earn his living by the sweat of his 
brow. He was a young man of sixteen years when he 
came to Terre Haute and his first position was secured 
with the Vandalia railroad, where he learned the trade 
of stone cutter. Next he built a few bridges for the Van- 
dalia and from 1873 to 1875 held a position in the employ 
of the state at the Julietta asylum. Upon his return, Mr, 
White learned the wood turner's trade and has been en- 
gaged in that business more or less ever since. He was 
in the employ of Clift & Williams for sixteen vears, being 
in charge eight years of the planing mill machinery. For 
three years the captain was a deputy under Sheriff Fasig, 
and stepped from the court house to the city hall when 
he accepted his present position. 

For eleven years Mr. White was captain of Canton 
McKeen and he is at present colonel of the Fourth Indiana 
Regiment of the Patriarchs Militant. He will take the 
members of the local Canton into the prize drills at Phila- 
delphia in September. Mr. White is also captain of 
Terre Haute Division No. 5 of the Maccabees. He is a 
Mason and a member of several other fraternal organiza- 
ti(ms. 





WARREN HUSSEY 



■ I "HE; Hussey name has been associated with tlie l)aiiking 
history of Terre Haute from the time it was only a 
small town. Preston Hussey, the father of Warren 
Hussey, whose face is seen on this page, recently rounded 
out forty years as president of the Xational State bank. 
Previous to tliat time lie was connected with two other 
financial institutions, one of them being the branch of the 
old State bank. Just recently the bank changed its name 
to the Terre Haute National bank. Mr. Hussey, Jr., is 
its cashier, and one of the best known young men of the 
town. Quiet and unostentatious, he fills an important 
place in local banking circles. 

Mr. Hussey was born in this city thirty-three years ago. 
He was one of Mr. Wiley's pupils in the high school for 
three years and then entered the Rose Polvtechiiic Insti- 
tute where he took a course in mechanical and electrical 
engineering, graduating in 1892. For three years he was 
engaged in tlie contracting liusincss at Cliicago and then 
returned home to accejjt a position as bookkeei)cr in tlie 
National State bank. He was jiromoted from this position 
to tluit of cashier. The liank is one of the soundest in 
the city and its conservatism has won it a large numlier of 
depositors. Tlie capital slock under llie new charter is 
$300,nOn, surplus, ?4.^,(in(), and the tleposits now amount 
to nearly one million dollars. 

The suggestion in the caricature indicates tliat Mr, 
Hussey is a lover of the great national .game, whicli is true. 
He is a menilier of the Young Husiness Men's clul) and 
several other organi/ations. 



WILLIAM P. BLAIR 



QPEAKING of brick, the earliest examples of this lirancli 
*^ of the ceramic art were doubtless the sun-dried bricks 
of Egypt, Assyria and Babylon. That bricks will 
outlast several centuries is shown by the discovery of 
them in ruins that are known to be at least four thousand 
years old. So, Mr. Blair is correct when he says that a 
brick will last much longer than the average individual. 
Bricks, while durable, are also very handy at times and 
many a man has answered in police court to the charge 
of laying them on other people's heads. 

Mr. Blair has been interested in the clay industry for a 
good many years and he knows what he is talking about 
when he says that bricks of the vitrified kind when laid 
right make the most lasting pavement. Mr. Blair 
first became interested in mining and the manufac- 
ture of clay products at Brazil in 1873. He moved to 
Terre Haute in 1894 and with Brazil and Terre Hatilc men, 
organized the Terre Haute vitrified Brick Companv. The 
plant is located across the river, west of the city. The 
plant turns out sixty thousand paying brick daily and 
the product is shipped to all parts of the United States. 
Since the vitrified brick busienss has been established, the 
use of the brick has not been confined to paving alone, 
but they are used extensively in building because of their 
impervious nature. Terre Haute vitrified brick is getting 
a splendid reputation and the company in which Mr. Blair 
is interested is constantly enlarging its capacity. In 
May Mr. Blair was elected President of the National 
Paving Brick Manufacturers Association, an organization 
which represents ninety-five per cent of the ])roduction. 

Mr. Blair was born in Hendricks county, Indiana, on a 
farm. He attended Earlham college three years and then 
began teaching school. For a time he read law and then 
entered into the manufacturing line. 





:^m^- 



HOMER B. TALLEY 



1\ 4R. TALLEV is taking a lirief rest from his labors. 
^"^ As sales agent for the Coal KlulT Mining Company 
he has a busy time of it, the product of nine big 
mines finding its way into the market each year mainly 
through his efforts. The company he repsesents has 
easily been the largest one for several years operating in 
this locahty, and has grown as the industry developed. 

While Mr. Talley is a young man for the position, he 
naturally falls into the coal business, as his father, J, 
Smith Talley, is one of the pioneer operators of this 
bituminous field. That the man with a college training 
has the advantage over many others is readily shown in 
all walks of life. Mr. Talley was born in Terre Haute in 
1877 and has taken full advantage of the educational 
opportunities oiTered him. He attended the local high 
school two years before entering DePauw University at 
Greencastle. He graduated from this institution in 1898 
with the degree of A. B. He then spent a year at Fontanel 
in charge of one of the company stores before entering 
the graduate school of Harvard, wliere he remained a 
year. Returning to Terre Haute, Mr. Talley liegan his 
services with the comjiany in his ]iresent ])ositiim July 1, 
1900. 

In addition to acting as salesman for the Coal Bluff 
Mining Company and the Plymouth Block Coal Company, 
Mr. Talley is secretary of the latter. The nine mines 
owned by the corporation are operated in Sullivan, \igo 
and Greene counties. Employment is given to about 
four thousand men. Mr. J. Smith Talley is president and 
treasurer of the Coal Bluff Company, Mr. W. E. Eppert, 
vice-president and Mr. J. W. I^andrum, secretary. 

At colle.ge Mr. Talley was a member of the Phi Kappa 
Psi fraternity. He is a lover of outdoor s]W)rts and enjoys 
automobiling. 



PETER VALENTINE GARTLAND 



JUST to show tliat he is practical, .Mr. r.artland, t)f the 
Gartland Foundry Com|iany, ]iused f<ir the "Phiz" 
artist as you see him here. He is seen in the act of 
pouring moulten metal into a mould. When cooled and 
shaken out of the black sand a queer looking piece of iron 
will be found. This casting will probably prove to be 
one of the parts of a lawn mower. Just recently the 
Gartland company received a contract which means about 
forty thousand new lawn mowers in the world. Imagine 
the aching backs that will result I 

The little state of Connecticut has furnished the country 
a great many manufacturers and this is the native state 
of Mr. Gartland. He was born in Westport on St. Valen- 
tine's day, 1872. The parents had little trouble in sup- 
plying a middle name for the new boy so his friends now 
know- what the "\"' stands for. Mr. Gartland engaged 
with his brother in the iron business in Cleveland when 
he was twenty years of age. He is practical from the 
ground up, in the casting of gray iron. When he heard 
of Terre Haute and its superior advantages, he and his 
brother came to Terre Haute and established a plant here 
in July, 1904. The company is incorporated as the 
Gartland Foundry Company, Mr. Gartland being general 
manager. Over one hundred men are given employment 
and the new industry has been busy ever since it started, 
making gray iron castings for lawn mowers, tyjjewriters, 
sewing machines and electrical machinery. The plant 
employs one hundred and fifty skilled workers. 

Mr. Gartland has identified himself with the city's 
interests by becoming a member of both the Commercial 
and the Manufacturers Clubs. He is an Elk and a mem- 
ber of the Knights of Columbus. Bowling and baseball 
are two sports in which Mr. Gartland is always more or 
less interested. 





CLAUDUS H. MARSHALL 



IT is just twenty-seven years ago that Mr. Marsliall Ijegan 
yelping for a rattle box and a tin whistle. He has 
been playing a successful tune in life ever since. We 
have him pictured here as one of the representatives of 
the House of Baldwin. In his jiresent capacity he is en- 
gaged in the scattering of sweet melody all over this part 
of the country and lUinois in the form of jiianos and organs 
that are made by this famous house. 

Mr. Marshall is a graduate of the Terre Haute high 
school. Upon the completion of his course he entered 
the Indiana State University, graduating from that institu- 
tion in 1901. with the degree of A B. He associated him- 
self with his father, Mr. J. A. Marshall, in the D. H. 
Baldwin Company in 1901 and is in toucli with all phases 
of the extensive business done in this district. Five 
coimties in Indiana and |)ractically all of Illinois witli the 
exception of the territory immediately adjacent to St. 
Louis and Chicago is taken care of by the Terre Haute 
office. Twenty-five salesmen and office employes are 
kept busy every day looking after the interests of the firm 
here. The Wabash avenue building contains a splendid 
display of the different styles and makes of musical instru- 
ments made by the House of Baldwin and a portion of the 
third floor is given over to the music room. Terre Haute 
is indebted to the D. H. Baldwin Comjiany for a number 
of rare musical entertainments wliich liave added to the 
pojiularity of the Baldwin goods. 

Mr. Marshall's greatest hobby is his Ijusiness, pianos, 
es])ecially of the Baldwin make, affording him greatest 
scope. He is identified with the Young Business Men's 
clul), lielongs to the local lodge of Klks and is a member 
of the Masonic order, lodge No. 19. 



HARRY BOGGS 



HERE we present the picture of an ex-newsjraper man 
and we candidly admit that we do it with a degree 
of envy. Any man who gets away from the news- 
paper business, having full possession of his faculties, 
retaining all of his friendships and able to wear "the smile 
that won't come off," deserves credit. A majority of men 
inveigled into the journalistic profession hang on until 
it is too late. Mr. Boggs did not do this. He admits 
that his newspaper experience has been invaluable and 
contends that there is no better training school in the 
world than is to be found in the modern newspaper office. 
Mr. Boggs has chased tlie "elusive item" and knows what 
it means to "fall down" on a story and has felt the thrill 
which a scoop imparts to a man w'ho is writing it. He 
has done funerals, runaways, fires, base ball, city council 
and has even attended a session of the Science Club. 

Mr. Boggs was born in Terre Haute. He received a 
diploma from Mr. Wiley in 189.r This diploma was 
handed to him on Friday night when he imagined that he 
was a modern Atlas. The following Tuesday he was driving 
a deUvery wagon for the Havens & Geddes Company. He 
was promoted from the wagon to one of the inside depart- 
ments and after getting this mercantile experience began 
as a "cub" reporter on the morning Express. After two 
years on the Express Mr. Boggs accejited a position in the 
editorial rooms of the Tribune. He was successful in 
his work and progressed very well, deserting journalism 
after six years experience to become deputy city clerk 
and com])troller under City Comptroller Buckingham. 
Mr. Boggs made the race for the nomination for city clerk 
in the recent campaign but did not procure quite enough 
votes. He has not soured a single bit, and w-ill issue you 
a vehicle or dog license quite cheerfully, at the same time 
showing every solicitude about your health and success. 
Mr. Boggs is a popular member of the Uniform Rank 
Knights of Pythias and is one of the best liked young men 
in the town. 





HERBERT BRIGGS 



IV yiR. BRIGGS, l)y his past ex|)erience, is in a position to 
■^ '••■ say something regarding the modern school building 
and education. When it comes to municipal prob- 
lems he could instruct us just as well on that subject. Mr. 
Briggs is not entirely theoretical. He has been one of our 
instructors for so long and has taken an interest in those 
a (fairs that mean so mucli fur the welfare of the city tliat 
he is thoroughly practical. 

Just when the civil war was at its hei.yht, Mr. Briggs 
was l5orn in Otter Creek township. He was left an orphan 
at nine years of age and for three years made his home 
with W. A. Jones, the founder of tlie Indiana State Normal 
school. Just as soon as Mr. Briggs graduated from the 
furrows he began teaching school. He attended the State 
\ormal School and qualified himself further for his pro- 
fession. He began teaching the young idea how to shoot 
in 1881 and since that time has been principal of the 
Eighth, Thirteenth an<l Eighteenth district schools. For 
the past nine years he has been at the Eighteenth district 
building, one of the model schools of the city. 

Mr. Briggs was elected as a republican meml)cr of the 
city council from the old Tenth ward in 1892 He was 
re-elected in 1894 and 1898 and represented the new Fifth 
ward in the council again in 1902. He did much during 
his councilmanic experience to modernize our school 
architecture, and was always a worker for a better sewer- 
age system. He favors the practical manual training 
idea in education and has always been interested in the 
boy. Mr. Bri,ggs has stood for those things that stand for 
the best government of a city. In 1905 he was a can- 
didate for the nomination for mayor, but was defeated. 

Mr. Briggs assisted in the organization of the Terre 
Haute Stove and Furnace Company and is its secretary. 
In secret orders, Mr. Briggs is a member of the Ddd Fellows 
and the Knights of Pythias. 



EDWARD J. WALSH 



""pHIiRK are a good many Walshes in tlic town, but 
only one Edward Walsh, as jiis friends will admit. 
There may not be nuieh in a name but sometimes 
it indicates ancestry. lidward Walsh is a descendant of 
a long line of Irish kings and they are to be found all over 
this broad land where a stout heart and willing hands are 
needed. If there had never been an Ireland we would 
have never had an Emmet and oiu police forces would be 
badly crippled. And do not forget that a majority of our 
citizens of Irish descent make gcjod jjoliticians and land 
frequently in prominent places. 

Edward Walsh was born in Terre Haute and he is pnjud 
of it. Just at the close of the \sar he became a citizen 
here and has stuck l)y the town through thick and thin. 
He attended St. Joseph's parochial school and after com- 
pleting his work learned the in>n mill business. He was 
engaged in this work for four years and in 1889 became 
a traveling salesman, representing the S. C. Barker whole- 
sale li(|uor house. He has had abundant opportunity to 
advertise Terre Haute as the best town on earth. After 
all, the advertising that a traveling salesman can give a 
city is considerable and he is no small factor in the life of 
Terre Haute. After engaging in the retail Inisiness for a 
brief time Mr. Walsh again returned to the road and later 
bought an interest in Mr. Barker's house, the firm being 
known as Barker S: Walsh. An extensive business is 
done in central and southern Iniliana and eastern and 
southern Illinois. Mr. \\ alsh is a member of the Elks, 
No. 86, the U. C. T. and the T. P. A. 





JOHN O. PIETY 



r^ID you ever stop to think that most of our lawyers 
^-^ comefrom the country ? Well, tliey do. John (_J. Piety 
is no exception to the rule for he was born in Prairie 
Creek township just at the close of the civil war. At four 
years of age he removed with his parents to Illinois and 
came dangerously near having to bear the appellation 
given residents of the great neighboring commonwealth, 
for he remained there imtil he was a yoimg man. 

Most of Mr. Piety's boyhood days were spent in Clark 
county, IlHnois, on a farm. He acquired the rudiments 
of his education in the country district schools and by 
doing considerable reading Mr. Piety fitted himself for 
teaching school. He used this profession as a stepping 
stone to that of the law. He taught school in Illinois for 
six years, studying Blackstone and other authorities 
during the summer vacations. For a time he was in the 
ullice of Colonel T. J. Golden, of Marshall, Illinois. After 
passing a rigid examination Mr. Piety was admitted to 
the Illinois bar in 1889 and shortly afterward located in 
Terre Haute, beginning the practice of law with his 
brother, James E. Piety. The partnership was con- 
tinued until 1896 when James E. Piety was elected circuit 
judge. Since that time Mr. Piety has been engaged in 
practice alone. He is interested in politics and has always 
been a republican. 

From 1894 to 1896 Mr. Piety was city attorney and 
during his term of office the famous Ohio street litigation 
with the Evansville and Terre Haute Railway began 
After an investigation Mr. Piety gave it as his opinion 
that the street could be opened at grade, providing dam- 
ages were paid, and began proceedings before the city 
commissioners. Suit was brought by .the railroad to 
enjoin the city and the case was taken to the supreme 
court where a decision was given in accordance with the 
opinion of the city attorney. Mr. Piety also prepared the 
law making it possible for the city to build a belt sewer, 
])aying for the same out of the general funds. 



TIMOTHY EDWARD M'NAMARA 



MR. M'NAMARA may be getting u line on prices or 
has received an intimation that tlie puHtical situa- 
tion in Cincinnati is undergoing great changes. 
In either event he is eager to hear the news. Mr. Mc- 
Namara has the news instinct pretty highly developed 
from his experience in journalism and it comes very 
natural for him to have his ear open for anythin.1;; affecting 
the distillery interests or the G. ( ). P. 

In Mayo county, Ireland, Mr. McN'aniara was liorn in 
the year 1846. This was just two years before the re- 
bellion in whicli Wilham Smith O'Brien and his followers 
figured so strongly. Just as the war broke out, Mr. 
McNamara landed on the shores of tlie United States. 
He settled at Dunkirk, New York, and began to learn 
telegraphy, having first served the Western l^nion com- 
pany as a messenger boy. He enlisted in the Ninth New 
York Cavalry in August, 1862, being sixteen years and 
four months old. The youthful soldier was in the army 
of the Potomac and remembers something of Gettysburg, 
Chancellorsville and Cedar Creek. After being mustered 
out in 1865 he was employed as a clerk in the war depart- 
ment at Washington for a time, and then located in Cin- 
cinnati. After a brief experience in the wholesale grocery 
business he became identified with the wholesale distilling 
trade and has been engaged in that line ever since. Mr. 
McNamara succeeded John E. Beggs as manager of the 
Terre Haute Distilling Company in July, 1903. 

As we have intimated, Mr. McNamara has been inter- 
ested in politics in Ohio for a great many years. Most 
Ohioans make good politicians and Mr. McNamara is no 
exception to the rule. At several different times he has 
conducted political papers and has a trenchant pen. In 
Ohio, Mr. McNamara is known as "Colonel," getting his 
title when he served as a colonel on the staff of Governor 
Charles Foster. Fishing is enjoyed by Mr. McNamara 
very much and when it comes to teUing whopping big 
fish tales he does not take a hack seat for the best of them. 
In all, Mr. McNamara is a genial man to know. 









JAMES C. HOLDEN 



ITERE we have one of the promoters of Lakeview Park 
*■ ■'■ calling attention to the great li\ing curiosities to 
be seen on the inside. The artist lias depicted Mr. 
Holden as a "sjieiler." To disabuse the minds of those 
who do not know Mr. Holden's position, we wish to say 
that he is the manager and not a "speller" after all. In a 
polite way, he might be called one, for it is his business 
to "boost" Lakeview with the aid of a good press a.gent 
and get the pubUc to pass through the turnstiles and leave 
a little money for expenses. Mr. Holden has other duties 
too numerous to mention. The lake must he ke])t filled 
with water. The scenic railway tracks must be well 
greased at all times. Some one must look after the 
monkey family and all balloon a.scensions must be made 
promptly on the hour advertised. Occasionally a vaude- 
ville star will have a kick coming because his act was not 
featured big enough, and again trouble results if new 
slides do not arrive the first of every week for the illus- 
trated songs. There are so many details to be looked 
after in the amusement business that it takes a good 
natured man to fill tlio bill and Mr. Holden is giving entire 
satisfaction. 

Mr. Holden came to Tcrre Haute from Cincinnati in 
1884. He was intending to go on west, until the con- 
ductor yelled "Terry Hut," and he took a look at the 
town. He decided to remain over for a few days. These 
days were prolonged into weeks, months and years. Mr. 
Holden first engaged in business here on Poplar street in 
1887, and in 1895 moved to his present location on North 
Seventh street. Mr. Holden was one of the promoters of 
Lakeview in 1903, and the new anmsement place opened 
for its first season in 1904. He is secretary, treasurer and 
general manager. Mr. Kolden was born in I^awrenceburg, 
Indiana, and went to Cincinnati when he was two years 
of age. He attended the public schools of the Queen 
City and spent two years in an academy at Middletown. 
He is a member of the Eagles, the Red Men, the Knights 
of the Ancient Essenic Drder and is deserveilly ])(i]nilar. 



SYRELL J. BRESETT 



«tN TOW, what else will you have Mrs, Jcines!' Potatoes? 
Oh, yes, two car loads of them. Arrived from 
Michigan yesterday. Eggsi" Freshest in town. 
Got them from the country yesterday. All laid the day 
before. Never sold a pound of Ijutter from this store yet 
that had a hair in it, and it's too late to start anything 
like that now. That'll be all, will it ^ Tliank you, Mrs. 
Jones, we'll get these down before dinner time," 

Syrell Bresett is geniality itself when waiting on a cus- 
tomer. We have him in the picture here as you are likely 
to see him any day when passing by his grocery store on 
east Wabash avenue. His store is a bee hive of industry 
from early Monday morning until late at night and if you 
were to ask Mr. Bresett about the snaj) in the grocery 
line, he would probably tell you there is nothing to it but 
work. It is a fact that a lazy man never made a success 
of the grocery business. Mr. Bresett's father was a grocer 
and just as soon as the son, Syrell, finished his school work 
he began to learn the business. New tricks are bobbing 
up in the trade every day. Mr. Bresett has a strictly 
cash store and believes that he can sell cheaper for cash 
than any other way. Goods are bought in large quantities 
direct from the manufacturer by Mr. Bresett and quick 
sales are the rule. 

Besides being interested in the grocery business, Mr. 
Bresett is a director in the Merchants Ice and Cold Storage 
Company. He was one of the men instrumental in organ- 
izing this company which is mutual to a great extent 
among the merchants. Mr. Bresett enjoys driving and 
is a lover of a good horse. Among the different sports 
he perhaps enjoys base ball the best. 





ALVIN 



HIGGINS 



WK liave a guotl view liere nf a real business lawyer, 
one that not only can give advice in business 
affairs but can conduct a commercial enterprise 
successfully himself. Jlr. Higgins is seen in the dual role 
of United States Commissioner and a manufacturer of 
United States mail wagons, ambulances and all kinds of 
vehicles, excepting lumber wagons. 

Mr. Higgins came very near Ijeing the first white child 
born in Superior, Wisconsin. This was Xoveniber 19, 
1866. His father was one of the pioneer preachers of the 
northwest and when the son came into the world, Superior 
was yet a small tow'n and almost inaccessible in some re- 
spects. Mr. Higgins received his collegiate training at 
( )berlin Colle.ge and came to Terre Haute in 1887, begin- 
ning the study of law in the offices of Stimson & Stimson. 
He was admitted to the bar here and began the practice 
of his profession alone, .^t jiresent lie is professionally 
associated with Mr. A. G. Cavins. Mr. Higgins has given 
much of his attention to that phase of the law pertaining 
to civil and business ])ractice. He became a memlier of 
the bar of the supreme court of the United States in 1899, 
and has served as commissioner for this district for several 
years. 

In |iolitics Mr, Hig,gins is a re])ublican and has always 
lieen an active worker. He served as jiresident of the 
Indiana f-icpublican f.eague in 1896 and 1897. He has 
lieen trustee of the Terre Haute Buggy and Carriage Com- 
pany since 1896, and has made a success of the business, 
tlie ]iroduct of the factory tindin.g its way to every ])art 
of the country. Government rural mail wagons, am- 
bulances and delivery wagons are manufactured. Mr. 
Higgins is also identified with the American Asbestos 
Company which owns extensive projierties. 

He is an lilk and a member of tlic Columbia Club of 
Indianapolis 



WILLIAM LEON HALSTEAD 



THE number of really successful newspaper|"men is 
small, which, after all, shows that the individuals 
will! are always ready to tell you how to "run" a 
newspaper, lack something when it comes to "delivering 
the goods." As an evangelist of moral welfare, prosperity 
and trade, the newspaper man stands in the front rank. 
Of course, he is liable to make mistakes at times, for, in 
no other profession are the faculties called into play so 
often in a single day. The modern journalist is constantly 
on the alert. He must seek facts, weigh evidence, choose, 
judge and act on the instant. Incidentally he nmst be 
able to pay off the pressmen, stereotypers, mail room 
employes, compositors, office help, editorial force, and 
meet all other necessary bills at least once a week. " Run- 
ning" a newspaper would be easy if it didn't reciuire a 
lot of hustling and some business ability. 

Mr. Halstead, the general manager nf tlie Tril)une- 
Gazette, whom we see here with the "extra" is a native 
of Spencer, Indiana, having been born there March ,3, 
1876. He received his education at Indiana University 
and the University of Nebraska, graduating from the latter 
school in 1898, receiving the degree of B. A. He received 
his first newspaper experience at Evansville, spending 
three years in that city. In turn he was reporter, city 
editor and advertising manager, occupying the last named 
position on the Courier. Mr. Halstead came to Terre 
Haute five years ago, first doing special advertising work. 
Next he was advertising manager for the Express and then 
was connected with the Success Magazine for a time. He 
returned from the east to acce])t the position of adver- 
tising manager on the Tribune. Within three months he 
was business manager and within less than a year was 
made general manager, having cimiplete control over both 
editorial and business dejiartments. He is one of the 
youngest managers in the country and has had sjjlendid 
success. 

Mr. Halstead is a lover of atliletics and was a memlier 
of the winning Nebraska footljall team. In college he was 
a member of the Signa Nu Fraternity. He is identified 
with the Commercial Club and the Young Business Men's 
Club, and is also a member of the antlered herd. No. 86. 




'^■^^ 




CLIFFORD G. HAMMERSTEIN 



A CERTAIN form of music seems to have existed in 
in all countries and at all times. Shakespeare gets 
off the following; 
"The man who hath no nuisic in himself 
And is not moved 1))' concord of sweet sounds 
Is fit for treasons, stratagems and spoils; 
The motions of his spirit are as dull as night 
And his affections as dark as Erebus; 
Let no such man be trusted." 
Mr. Hammerstein, whom we see here, is an enthusiastic 
jjromoter of "rag-time" and queejisware. He has done 
much to save us from being all that Shakespeare has de- 
scribed and we are grateful to him. As an exponent of 
"rag-time" he has wonderful interpretative powers and 
he is equally proficient in bringing out the best points on 
pottery queensware and china. He Ukes the notes of 
Uncle Sam's persuasion and confidentially states that he 
could not exist on note meal. 

It hasn't been so very long ago since Mr. Hammerstein 
was born in Terre Haute. To give the exact year, it was 
in 1882, before boards of safety caused so much trouble. 
After completing his education in the public schools he 
went into the queensware store of his father, George Ham- 
merstein. He has paid strict attention to business and 
one year ago became a member of the firm. The firm 
easily does the largest business of its kind in this section 
of the country, carrying a complete and up-to-date fine 
of glassware, cjueensware, pottery and china. The whole- 
sale end of the store re(|uires the services of the junior 
member of the firm on the road a part of the time as sales- 
man and he covers territory within a radius of fifty miles 
of the city. Four floors are used by the firm in its Wabash 
avenue place. 

Mr. Hammerstein is one of the musically inclined mem- 
bers of the Elk's lodge, No. 86, he is also a member of the 
Young Business Men's Club, the Travelers Protective 
Association and the United Commercial Travelers. 



OTTO C. HORNUNG 



' I 'HERE was an old woman who lived in a shoe, but this 
isn't she. No, this is a young man who doesn't live 
in a shoe. He makes his living out of shoes, how- 
ever, as he is tlie proprietor of one of tlie liest known 
retail shoe stores on Wabash avenue. 

Vou will notice that the shoe seems to fit Mr. Hornung 
first-rate. That's a peculiarity of the goods sold at his 
store and that, in addition to their good quality and style, 
explains why they are so popular. 

Mr. Hornung began his business career several years 
ago as a cash boy at the big store of Hoberg, Root & Com- 
pany. "Cash" was hammered into his ears so persist- 
ently that he determined to get into a place where he could 
get more of it and he was soon occupying a position in the 
office. For ten years he was with the Stein-Hecklesberg 
Shoe Company, obtaining an experience that has stood 
liiin well in the conduct of his present business. He was 
manager of the Palace Shoe store and spent two years as 
a traveling shoe salesman. In 1892 he engaged in the 
shoe business with Mr. Bernheimer, this partnership being 
dissolved shortly afterwards. As proprietor and manager 
of his present establishment he caters to a big trade. 

Mr. Hornung has always taken an interest in the affairs 
of Company No. 3, Uniform Rank, Knights of Pythias, 
and is its second lieutenant. He has participated in all 
of the company's famous prize drills since 1892. His 
greatest hobby is fishing. 

Mr. Hornung is a director of the Young I3usiness Men's 
Club and is secretary of the Retail Merchants Association. 





SAMUEL C. BUDD 



WHEN' a Iniy (ill llie I'arin in Hniiey Crt-c-k tipwiisliip, 
Wr. Hudd luul :i desire to become a merchant, liut 
he took a roundaljout way to gain his point. He 
actually gave up teaching school for a position in the mer- 
cantile world that paid him a much smaller salary. But 
he is satisfied with the change and would rather sell a suit 
of clothes any day than instruct the young idea in the 
simple elements of geography, arithmetic and grammar. 

Mr. Budd has Uved in \'igo county all of his hfe and 
hasn't a complaint to make about it. He attended the 
private seminary of Professor Finney, at Prarieton, and 
later spent several terms at the Normal. Then he began 
his teaching career, still keeping an eye on the day when 
he would be behind a counter in Terre Haute. Finally the 
opportunity came and Mr. Budd accepted a position in 
the Meyers clothing store at a salary that was much 
smaller than that he was receiving as a pedagogue. After 
getting a valuable experience as a salesman he became a 
member of the firm of the A. C. Brice Company. Later he 
was general manager of the drj' goods department of the 
Hoberg & Root Company and assisted in the opening of 
the big store. He was with Pixley & Company several 
vears before becoming general manager of their local store. 

It was following the big fire that Mr. Budd solicited 
local merchants to attend a meeting at the Terre Haute 
club, where the nucleus of the ])resent Commercial Club 
was formed. At tliis meeting the by-laws and constitu- 
tion were discussed which made possible the ])resent 
splendid organization. 

Mr. Budd has always been an active republican and 
served the city as councilman-at-large one term. He was 
one of the first merchants to assist in forming the local 
baseball association and believes that a good baseball team 
helps to advertise the city. Mr. Budd has served as 
president of the Thompson club and at present is a member 
of both the Commercial Club and the Young Business 
Men's Club. He is adjutant of the first battahon of the 
Sixth Regiment Knights of Pythias, and has always been 
active in pronmtin.g Pylliianisni. He enjoys his vacation 
periods on a farm whicli lie recently acfpiired in Owen 
county. 



JOHN R. CONNELLY 



|\/IK, COXNULLY liad answered the call for empty 
^" ^ "flats" a good many years in Terre Haute and 
\ icinity before he engaged in the filling of them 
lumself. This was when he occupied a position in the 
freight department of the Chicago and Eastern Illinois 
and the Evansville and Terre Haute roads. Now he knows 
just what it means to be "shy" several cars when they 
are badly needed. The coal business is so closely re- 
lated to the railroad business that it was comjiaratively 
an easy thing for Mr. Connelly to turn his attention to the 
former, after long years of service in the traffic world. 
Terre Haute owes considerable to the coal industry, and 
the railroads have done their share in ilcvelnping it to the 
present proportions. 

Thirty-five years ago Mr. Coiiik-11\- came to Terre Haute 
He was very small at the time and it was his first visit 
here. He soon adapted himself to his surroundings and 
has been able to get along very well. He began his rail- 
road career as a messenger boy for tlie Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois railroad and held his first position of any import- 
ance in the freight department. After ten years in the 
freight end of the business he was iironioted to the general 
agents' office. In 1894 he became conmiercial agent of the 
Evansville and Terre Haute and the Chicago and Eastern 
Illinois and was promoted to the position of general agent 
June 15. 1895. Mr. Connelly took care of the interests of 
the two roads in Terre Haute in this cajiacity until he 
resigned in April, 1905. It was then that he became a 
partner with George J. NattkemjJer in the coal business. 
The firm is sales agent for the Southern Indiana railroad 
and is one of the best known in the citv 

Mr. Connelly is an Elk, a niciubei of the Kinghts of 
Pythias and Knights of Columbus. 




MYRON A. BOOR 




pvR. MYRON A. BOOR was born at Staunton, Clay 
^'^ county, Indiana, in 1872. After completing his 
work in the graded and high scliools he studied 
medicine at the Indiana llniversity and the Polyclinic 
of N'ew York Citv. 



HARRY L. KINSER 



IF we sliduld tell a stranger that Harry I,. Kinser gains 
■^ his livelihood by digging in the earth, or, rather, by 
watching and directing the other fellows while they 
do it, he might get the idea that Harry is either a miner 
or an oil speculator or a gas man or an artesian well driller 
or a farmer, or one of a dozen other kinds of workmen 
whom that expression would quite accurately describe, 
liut he isn't. True, he was a mimir until he reached his 
majority, but then he quit off short. Mr. Kinser is con- 
nected with the Kinser Construction Conqiany, and to 
him falls a great deal of the work of superintending large 
contracts at various points in the country. The opera- 
tions of the Kinser company are chiefly in the line of 
building sewer systems, parks, paving streets, building 
railroads, etc. In fact there is hardly anything too big 
for the concern to undertake and carry tlimugh success- 
fully. Tlie company is constantly busy handling big con- 
tracts of this kind, and, as a consc(|uence, Harry has to 
keep moving. 

Mr. Kinser. is a Terre Haute product l)ut is guilty of 
having lived in Muncie for a time, where he attended 
school. In 1892 he engaged in the contracting business 
with his father and his brother, William Kinser. At 
])resent the firm is handling a large contract for the South- 
ern Indiana railroad, building the biggest portion of the 
Chicago division and the enitre Indianapolis division of 
the road. Mr. Kinser is vice-president of the firm and is 
watching the building operations of the road most of the 
time in Illinois. 

Mr. Kinser is a baseball and ]ic>lii fan and knows Vjoth 
games quite thoroughly. When nut ti>i> busy he will dis- 
cuss either subject with you. He is a member of the P'lks, 
No. 86, and is also a member of the Kni.ghts of Cohunbus. 




yM 




"^> 



FRANK W. RAY 



A I'TER jamuiry 1. 1'»I5, Mr. Ray, wIkisc excellent 
likeness we present here, will be the man to take 
vour "fives" at the conrt house. He is the county 
treasurer-elect and has already familiarized himself with 
the most important duties of the office. TJnce before the 
taxpayers had a Ray for county treasurer. Tliis time it 
is the son that is honored. C. A. Ray was treasurer from 
1880 to 1884 and filled the olTice with credit to himself and 
liis friends. The son, Frank, gives every ])romise of doing 
as well. 

Mr. Ray is nol aslianicd of the fact that he was born on 
a farm in Riley township. To be exact, the date was 
March 1, 187, >. h'rank was a small boy when he came to 
Terre Haute in 1880. at the time his father assumed the 
duties of the ollice He remained in Terre Haute just 
four years when he returned to the farm and followed the 
])low mitil he was ready to enter the Terre Haute high 
school. After three years in the high school tlie county 
treasurer-elect went to the Indiana State I'niversity 
where he took iioth the law and classical courses, graduat- 
ing in 1901. 

The year of his graduation Mr. Ray was a])pointed 
deputy treasurer under Mr. Clark and has been in the 
office ever since. He made a successful race for the nom- 
ination for treasurer and won out over his democratic 
opponent with several votes to sjiare. Mr. Ray is an Elk, 
a Mason and a member of llic Knights of Pythias as well 
as the Wabash CycUng Club. He is an authority on duck 
hunting along the Wabash, and never fails to do a little 
shooting every spring and fall. 



H. EARL WEBER 



■ I 'HE typewriter is the vehicle by which many a person 
■*• has been carried to splendid success. Every little 
while w'e read of some plain, demure stenographer, 
succeeding in capturing her wealthy employer for a hus- 
band. Evidently these young ladies are tired of being 
dictated to Ijy a horrid man and know tliat tliis is the only 
way to get a chance to turn the tables. There are several 
reasons for tliis. Take, for instance, an old l^iachelor. too 
mucli wrapped up in Ijusiness to go out into society or in 
other ways mingle with the fair sex. Shut in his private 
room, a frown upon his brow, he dictates: "John Jones 
and Company, New York. Gentlemen: W'e have yours 

of what was the date of their letter. Miss Brown?" 

sternly addressing the girl with the machine and notebook. 

"The sixteenth, sir," she replies sweetly. 

He is looking directly into her deep, Ijrown eyes, whose 
long, dark lashes droop as they meet his clianged expres- 
sion. He had never seemed to look at her before. To 
him she was suddenly transformed into a radiant, beautiful 
being, too heavenly, too precious to hear another word 
about John Jones and Company, or any other common- 
place mortals. It is the beginning of the end. ,Soon a 
new girl is at the typewriter. Perhaps she w'ill capture 
the chief clerk or the janitor. 

Mr. Weber is the man wlio is liack of all this sort of 
thing in the vicinity of Terre Haute, as he is tlie district 
representative of tlie Underwood Typewriter Com])any. 
Born and reared in Wabash, Indiana, he later resided at 
several points in the state, finally landing in Indiapanolis 
where he learned all about typewriters. He has been 
successful in selling a large number of the Underwoods in 
Terre Haute and locality. He has good reasons for pro- 
claiming the Underwood tlie liest machine on the market. 





GEORGE OSCAR DIX 



/^ EORGE OSCAR DIX was born'thirty-one years ago 
in Prairie Creek township, \"vj.o eminty, on what is 
known as the old Dix farm, this farm liaving been 
in the family since 1836, during whicli time it has been 
occupied by his father, grand-father and great-grand- 
father. He is a great grandson of Elijah Thomas, who 
settled in this county in 1812, and who was one of its first 
coimty commissioners. 

His father died when George was but four years old and 
with his mother, the only immediate member of his family, 
he moved to Terre Haute in 1S90. He was graduated 
from the high school in 189.'> and from the law department 
of the University of Indianapolis in 1898, having carried 
away the thesis \>nve from that institution. He began 
the practice of law in the office of Stimson, Stimson & 
Condit, with whom he had studied, and in 1900 opened 
up offices for himself at Xo. 509 1-2 ( >hio street, where he 
is now located. Mr. Dix does not do any criminal prac- 
tice, liut confines himself exclusively to the civil law. He 
has given special attcniton to the laws of the various states 
and foreign countries relative to the creation and control 
of business corporations and he has a well selected library 
covering this subject. He has always stood for ]iro- 
gression and the modern ideas in law and liusiness. He 
has great faith in the future of Terre Haute and never 
loses an opportunity to assist in its advancement, He is 
a meiTiber of a number of the leading organizations of this 
city, among which are the Connnercial Chib, the Young 
Business Men's Club, the Country Club llic Terre Haute 
Literary Club and the Elks. 



FRED B. SMITH 



]\yiR. S.MITH has been experimenting so lung in the 
■^'■'- automobile line that he has become an expert 
chauiTeur and can repair his own machine when 
necessary. \\'e have here a glimpse of the thirty-six 
horse power machine that Mr. Smith drives. He is not 
stingy about taking his friends out riding either. Perhaps 
this is the reason that he has kept swapping and buying 
until at this writing he has the biggest machine in town. 
Mr. Smith is one of the original auto cranks of Terre Haute 
and enjoys nothing better than a run on the coimtry roads, 
where he can linger momentarily in the sliade of the tall 
sycamores and get a scent from tlie new mown hav. 

Mr. Smith came to Terre Haute from Mr. Bryan's state 
nearly a dozen years ago. In Neljraska City, Nebraska, 
Mr. Smith procured his first knowledge of the distilling 
business as an employe of the revenue department and 
was engaged in the manufacture of spirits there. When 
lie came to Terre Haute he was associated with Mr. George 
W'oolsey. Together they organized the Indiana Distilling 
Company and Mr. Smith became secretary of the com- 
pany. The plant was sold to the American Distributing 
Company and Mr. Smith assumed the management at 
which time he also built the Majestic Distillery for the 
same corporation. Mr. Smith resigned his position in the 
fall of 1898 to organize the Merchants Distilhng Company 
of which he is president and the largest stockholder. Re- 
cently a disastrous fire visited the jilant. The ashes had 
no more than cooled wlien Mr. Smith was at work superin- 
tending the rebuilding. 

Mr. Smith enjoys hunting and fisliing and lias a summer 
lionie at Burt Lake, Michigan, where he enjoys liinisclf 
every season. He is an entluisiastic niember of the local 
lodge of Elks, Xo. 86. 





WILLIAM H. MORRIS 



MR. MORRIS will never forget his first business experi- 
ence in Terre Haute. He and his brother, Jefferson 
Morris had been engaged in the restaurant and 
bakery trade at Danville, Indiana. A good patronage had 
been established and at the opportune moment they sold 
out, coming to Terre Haute to invest their $1,400. A 
shrewd Yankee book agent scented something doing and 
struck a bargain with them. He engaged the Morris boys 
to represent two states for him in the book business. 
Possessing slight knowledge of this particular line, the 
$1,400 soon disappeared and S.SOO additional. This was 
a lesson they never forgot and pluckily the brothers went 
to work, accepting the first ])osition that came their way. 
Tliey met all obligations and were on their feet again 
within a short time. 

Mr. Morris, who is seen liere identified with the .grocery 
business, was born in West \'irginia, but moved to Ken- 
tucky, near Covington, when he w'as three years of age. 
Until he was nearly of age he managed his father's farm 
and other interests, engaging in some trading on the side. 
He joined his brother in the restaurant business at Dan- 
ville, Indiana and then the disastrous book expeiience 
followed. While his brother, Jefferson, conducted a 
grocery store on Ohio street for two years, Mr. Morris wer.t 
to liis home. He returned and engaged in partnership 
with Iiis lirother and after three years became the sole 
proprietor, establishing himself at his present location 
w'here he has been in business ever since. Mr. Morris is 
ready to admit that there is no business more exacting, 
for he has not had a vacation since the store opened. He 
handles only first-class articles in the provision line, com- 
bining meats and fruits along with the staples. 

Mr. Morris is interested in real estate and has unbounded 
faith in Terre Haute. If he has a hobby it is his love for 
fine driving horses. This is excusable, however, as he 
comes from Kentuckv, 



DOW R. GWINN 



Dow R. GWINN will never forget his first experience 
as a timekeeper on a trench which was being dug 
for the w-ater works company at Quincy, lUinois, his 
former home. It was his first position with a water works 
company and a majority of the men who did the digging 
were sons of Erin. It was approaching pay day and Mr. 
Gwinn was making a few inc|uiries. 

"What's your name'?' he asked one of the workers down 
in the trench. 

"Six days and tliree-C|uarthers, sor," was the unex- 
pected reply. 

"How long have you l)een at work?" was the next 
question. 

"Teddy Waters is me name." 

"Well, how do you spell it?" 

Then Mr. Waters straightened up in the trench and 
rested his hands on his spade. Taking a square look at 
the timekeeper he said, "Spell it yersilf; that's phwat yez 
are gettin' paid for!" 

This is one way Waters had of getting acquainted with 
the timekeeper. 

Mr. Gwinn was born in Quincy, Illinois, in 1862. He 
had just completed the graded school's course when he 
began hustling. He "cubbed" in a printing office and 
cigar factory and finally landed in a candy manufactory 
where he worked his way u|] to a responsible place and 
then went to work for the Quincy Water Works Company. 
He advanced rapidly and w^hen he came to Terre Haute 
in 1901 he had been the secretary of the Quincy Company. 
He is president and general manager of the local comjiany 
and is also general manager of five other water works 
plants located in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Kansas. 

Since coming here a new settling basin has been installed 
by Mr. Gwinn and new engines placed, increasing the 
capacity of the local plant to forty-five million gallons daily 
though only four millions are needed now. Mr. Gwinn is 
foremost in all that pertains to a more beautiful city. He 
is interested in beautiful lawns and clean streets and would 
have all the bare and neglected corners of the city made 
more inviting by the planting of flowers. He is a director 
in the Young Men's Christian Association, the Social Settle- 
ment, the Ti.ght House Mission and the Terre Haute 
Cliaiitaii(|tia .'Vssendily, 





JOSEPH S. JENCKES, JR. 



"V/OU would liardly suspect that Joseph Jenckes, Jr., 
chief clerk to Su])erintendent Downini; of the main 
line division of llic- Wmdalia, is an inventor. W'licn 
not busy with llie detail work of his ]:>osition, or riuinin>; 
the main line division in the alisencc of Mr. Downing, Mr. 
Jenckes is cudgeling his brain to invent a device that will 
add still greater speed and safety to railway travel. Ever 
since George Stephenson employed locomotive power on 
the Killingworth railway, in England, in 1814, there has 
been a steady and wonderful develoimient in the railroad 
world. Mr. Jenckes is the inventor of a continuous cross- 
ing which may prove a great success. He enjoys delving 
into mechanics and enginering. 

Mr. Jenckes was born in the liiggest German town in 
the state of Iowa — Davenjiort. He left the odors of beer, 
sauerkraut and weinerwurst just as soon as he was old 
enough to travel and located with his jiarents at Indian- 
apohs. Finishing his ccjiirse of study in the pidjlic schools, 
he began to learn the printers' trade, but abandoned 
the art preservative when he had mastered the dots and 
hooks of shorthand. In 1894 he accepted a jiositicm in 
the office of Purchasing Agent Paddle, of the X'andalia, 
Indianapolis. He became a stenographer in .Sujierintend- 
ent Hatch's otTice in 1896 and came to Terre Haute in 
1899, to acce])t a place as stenf)grapher in Superinetndent 
Miller's ofiice. When Mr. \V. C. Downing was made super- 
intendent of the main line, in 1902. Mr. Jenckes was 
promoted to his present jilace as chief clerk. 



FRANCIS C. CRAWFORD 



MR. CRAWFORD, or "Major" Crawford, if you will— 
for he rightfully deserves the title — is just handing 
out an envelope to one of the fifty-five hundred 
employes of the Vandalia system. The boys along the 
Une welcome Major Crawford just as heartily as they do 
their money. For thirteen days out of every month the 
\'andalia paymaster is on the road making glad the hearts 
of the employes, from the man at the crossing to the one 
at the throttle. 

Mr. Crawford is a good fellow to know. He is interesting 
and has had lots of experience in this old world. He was 
born in Terre Haute October 13, 1839. He was a pupil of 
Weldon Modesitt at the Old Seminary and completed his 
education at Kenyon College, Gambler, Ohio. He was in 
Europe two years after leaving Kenyon and added to his 
collegiate course abroad. He had hardly returned to 
Terre Haute when he took up arms in defense of the flag 
and enlisted in the Eighty-Fifth Indiana Regiment of 
Infantry. He was placed on staff duty almost immedi- 
ately and served as adjutant-general of a brigade and later 
was in the same position with a division. Major Crawford 
will never forget his two months' experience in Libby 
])rison where he was held a prisoner. He got even with 
the Johnnies later when he made the march with Sherman 
to the sea. Upon being mustered out in 1865, Mr. Craw- 
ford engaged in the retail and wholesale shoe business for 
five vears and then went into the railroad business. He 
has been with the "Van" for twenty-seven years, most of 
the time in his present responsible position. 

Before the city began to put on airs, Mr. Crawford was 
a member of the old volunteer fire department and was 
captain of the Mohawk, one of the famous fire fighting 
machines of a quarter of a century ago. Of all towns on 
earth, the Major thinks Terre Haute the best of all. He 
is a Knight Templar and counts his friends not only in 
Terre Haute but everywhere the \'andaha pay carstops. 





CHARLES ABBEY MEWHINNEY 



THINK (if tlie ,L;iiiJ(i Mr. Mu\sliinney does as a manu- 
facturer of delicious ljon-l)ons. He is probably 
entitled to as much credit for the large number of 
weddings over the country as any other single individual. 
Take for instance the case of tlie young man who has 
hopes of winning tlie heart and hand and miUinery bills 
of the fairest damsel in tlie adjoining ward. Suppose he 
doesn't come right out and tell her what he's thinking 
about, but eacli evening when he calls, or at least on Sun- 
days, brings her a liox of Mewhinney's fine chocolates. 
No girl can withstand such treatment and especially when 
the voung man assures her that life will be one continuous 
round of Mewhinney bon-lions if she will but marry him. 
Charles Mewhinney has always fived here, having 
brightened the Mewhinney home in 1877 with his initial 
presence. He dutifully attended tlie graded schools and 
was ijersistent enough to win a diploma frcjm the local 
high school. Then he went into the manufacturing con- 
fectionary lousiness with his fatlier and brother. He is 
the secretary and treasurer of the comjiany and also sales 
manager. He travels a great deal, representing the in- 
comparable Mewhinney chocolates and other delicious 
confections in Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania and the south- 
west. Down in Texas and Louisiana and Mississippi, Mr. 
Mewhinney has added to the fame of Terre Haute liy sell- 
ing the product of the local factory. Local agents are 
maintained in Seattle, Pittsburg and Chicago, wliicli ccm- 
veys an idea of tlie volume of business done l>y the -Mew- 
hinney Company. 

Mr. Mewhinney is an Klk, a Mason and a member of 
Uie Voung Business Men's Club. He enjoys horseliack 
riding and [ilavs golf fre(|uently on the Country Club 
links. 



JOHN M. HEDGES 



■ I "HE picture doesn't illustrate what you would call an 
■*■ attitude of rest or repose. Mr. Hedges is seen here 
giving some of his em])loyes a little help in lowering 
a safe from tlic foiirtli floor of the Grand Opera house 
block. Tliere »oulcl lie \cTy little to chronicle if the r(j|)e 
should Ijreak. Hut just to prevent an accident, Mr. 
Hedges makes it his special business to see that his ro]ies 
and tackle are in first class condition. About all of tlie 
safes in town are loaded, and unloaded and hoisted and 
-lowered by >.Ir. Hedges. It is lietter this way, because 
it gives Mr. Fledges something to do and no one else seems 
especially fitted to perform the task. 

Mr. Hedges is a Hoosier by birth and has been a resident 
of Terre Haute for eighteen years, \\nien he first came 
to the city he engaged in the seUing of farm machinery 
and agricultural implements. Later he was associated 
with M. T. Hidden in the task of laying the dust on hot 
summer days and later gathered the dust from the mer- 
chants. Ten years ago Mr. Hedges established the I'nion 
Transfer Company. Five years ago he added a storage 
department to his liusiness. In his warehouse he has a 
floor space of about ten thousand square feet and you can 
find everything stored there from a baby carriage to an 
automobile. Mr. Hedges has made a specialty of handling 
safes, pianos and other heavy articles and is well equipped 
in every way for tlie transfer business. He gives em- 
ployment to a large numlier of men and kee])S Inisy all 
of the time. In e\ery way the Union Transfer Coni])any 
is the largest business of its kind in the citv and Mr. 
Hedges owes much of his success to huslliiig methods and 
prompt service. 

Mr. Hedges is a mendjer of the Kniglits of Pythias, Xo. 
81, and the Commercial Club, 





WILLIAM R. MATTOX 



ly /IR. MATTOX would have made either a preacher or a 
^"■*- lawyer. The argumentative side of his nature is 
well developed and he has tackled some mighty big 
questions. He has not been averse to engaging in debate. 
The first, last and only public debate in which the doctor 
engaged was with a Canipl)ellite preacher in the Armory 
a few years ago. It required three evenings for the de- 
baters to argue pro and con on a weighty theological ques- 
tion and satisfy themselves that they were right. The 
auditors had nothing to say and showed remarkable cour- 
age by filling the Armory each night. 

Dr. Mattox was born on a farm down in Orange county, 
Indiana. He taught eight terms of school and then began 
thinking about following some other profession. He 
imagined that he would starve to death if he quit teaching 
and then decided that he would starve if he didn't. He 
then attended the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louis- 
ville. He practiced seven years as an undergraduate and 
completed his medical education at Rush Medical College 
Chicago. He then located at Youngstown, this county. 
In 1890 he was elected coroner on the democratic ticket 
and was re-elected in 1892. Upon completing his last 
term as coroner he began the jjractice of medicine in 
Terre Haute. The doctor is a member of the Vigo Medical 
Society, the Aesculapian Society, and is also on the Union 
Hospital Staff. His son. Earnest L. Mattox, is now asso- 
ciated with him, having graduated from Rush College this 
year. 

Dr. Mattox is one of tlie Terre Haute physicians ulio 
enjoy the game of base ball thoroughly. He is an en- 
thusiastic fan and attends the Athletic Park games when 
his time will permit. He is a memljer of Conqiany No. 
83, of the Knights of I'ytliias. 



WILLIAM C. DORSEY 



IT cannot be said of William C. Dorsey that he is afraid 
of hard work. Any one who has "scraped" for a 
living from Mexico to Ishpeming must be somewhat 
of a hustler. It takes plenty of sand and gravel to keep 
going and William has always been able to obtain a firm 
grip on the rails, even though he had a mighty poor start. 
A jolt or two on the gravel wagon now has no terrors for 
Mr. Dorsey. 

Contractor Dorsey happened in Dubois county, Indiana, 
in 1663. When a very small boy he came to this city 
and began getting busy almost immediately. While at- 
tending the public school he sold newspapers, carried a 
route on the Express and eventually was the "devil" on 
that paper. He progressed further in the publishing 
business and ran the press. Next he took a course of 
study in a business college. Then he learned the machinist 
trade, and this was mainly responsible for him leaving 
Terre Haute and spending some years in other states 
where he picked up an excellent knowledge of men, ran a 
steamboat on the upper Mississippi, fired on a locomotive, 
learned civil engineering and something about contracting. 
Back to Terre Haute came Mr. Dorsey. For a time he 
worked for the city in its engineering department, was 
deputy state oil inspector eight years and then established 
himself in business as a general contractor. Mr. Dorsey. s 
business has reached big proportions and he does a busi- 
ness amounting to many thousands of dollars annually, 
and he employs a large number of men. His interests 
are extensive along other lines, mainly the drug business 
and farming. 

In 1889 Mr. Dorsey was imited in marriage to Miss 
Lilly Carpenter, of Brazil, who presides over a very 
comfortable and happy home on South Center street. 

He is one of the best known lodge men in town, being 
a member of the Elks, the Knights of Pythias, the Mac- 
cabees, Masonic lodge No. 19, and several other fraternal 
and secret organizations. 



.Z3- 





ROBERT OWEN MILLER 



FORMERLY, in EnsHsli law phraseology, a roll was 
denominated a book. There is yet a close relation 
existing between a "roll" and books. Take, for 
example, Mr. Carnegie. 

Mr. Miller, who we see here, is not ccmcerning himself 
with a deckle edge work of literature, but rather the 
ledger — the important hook of the modern business 
house. Mr. Miller is an expert accountant and knows 
the details of the bookkeeping system which enables the 
business man to ascertain just what condition his affairs 
are in. 

Mr. Miller is sentimental enough to remember Bridgeton, 
Parke county, as the place of his birth. Although the 
place never became a thriving city, it is remembered as 
a place where many happy days were spent by the bare- 
footed boy, who could hop out of town in a minute and 
find himself in a blackberry patch, or enjoy a chase after 
a ground squirrel. At nineteen years of age Mr. Miller 
came to Terre Haute. He accc])ted his first position in 
the Hoberg, Root & Company store as l^ookkeeper and 
after ten years of service became a member of the firm. 
He was in the dry goods business until 1904. when the 
Root stock was sold. 

There is not a more enthusiastic member of the Knights 
of Pythias in the town than Mr, Miller. It can truly be 
said that the Uniform Rank is his hobby. At present he 
is first lieutenant of Company Ko. 3, the oldest active 
uniform rank com])any in the world. Mr. Miller has par- 
ticipated in all of the big drills held by this famous com- 
jiany and has served from the ranks througli every position 
up to his present one. .\ny form of military tactics takes 
the eye of Mr. Miller. ( lulside of his (ileasure found in 
military afl'airs, Mr Miller pro1)ably enjoys shooting the 
l)est. 



WILLIAM F. CRONIN 



TJERE is disclosed to the view of the unsuspecting the 
*■ *■ interior of a "scoop" factory. Far be it however, 
to convey the impression that this is any subsidized 
section of the tool trust. W. F. Cronin is the city editor 
of the Terre Haute Tribune-Gazette. His tenure of office 
is of a most tenacious temperament, as it has survived 
about a half a dozen changes in management of that paper. 
W. F. arrived one lileak January night twenty-seven 
years ago. The stub-toe and short pants epoch was 
weathered without any conspicuous distinction, the young 
man having all that he could do in stilling two consuming 
ambitions. If he couldn't be a dog catcher, he intended 
on another route to fame — that of conductor on a street 
sprinkling cart. His education he pilfered from the paro- 
chial and high school of the city, he never having attempted 
to molest any of the institutions of higher education. The 
great school of experience, however, found him an early 
and insistent applicant and, as he explains himself, he is 
still taking the post graduate course in the primer class. 
The subject of this sketch modestly admits to an inventive 
turn of mind and his development of the burglar proof 
egg and non-collapsible macaroni attracted attention to 
him long before he became conspicuous in the world of 
journalism. Mr. Cronin was precipitated into the vortex 
of Ijusiness by way of a real estate office, but ere two weeks 
had elapsed he became convinced he had a message to 
deliver. Whether to deliver it by the Western Union or 
the Postal, vexed him. Then it was that a bright light 
broke in upon him. He'd deliver it himself. Why not? 
This explains his debut into newspaperdom. Mr. Cronin's 
style is something between that of Horace Greely and 
Thomas Lawson, but he exonerates both of these gentle- 
men entirely. Its effectiveness, however, goes without 
question when are recalled his memorable campaign against 
the embalmed beef at the press club's banquet and his 
advocacy of a navigable Wabash with ball bearing, rubber 
tired boats. Altogether his brief sojourn here has been 
crammed with affairs momentous, satisfying enough in 
themselves to allay any remorse over tlie stulted aspira- 
tions of^the_dog-catching-street-sprinkUng era. 





SAMUEL PRAGER 



MR. PRAGER was born in Vienna in 1867. While he 
was yet a small boy he decided Ihat he would hke 
to learn the jeweler's trade. His father was con- 
sulted and the young man became an apprentice, tlie 
parent being obliged to deposit one hundred florins in 
advance each year to insure the employer against all 
damage done by the beginner to tools and goods. Mr. 
Prager worked four years for this jeweler and at the end 
of that time wanted his certificate showing he was a full- 
fledged jeweler. The old world custom again came into 
play. The apprentice was obliged to work in fourteen 
dilTerent cities, getting letters from the jewelers he worked 
for, showing his proficiency. With these fourteen signa- 
tures, Mr. Prager again presented himself to the jewelers 
union and was granted his much desired diploma or cer- 
tificate. 

At eighteen years of age, Mr. Prager left \'ienna and 
came to the United States and located in Chicago, working 
at his trade. His skill in watch making aided him in 
procuring a position as inspector of watches in the Elgin 
factory, where he remained c.'ghteen months. Then he 
went east, locating in Pittsburg where he gained his knowl- 
edge of the retail business. In 1900 Mr. Prager opened 
a workshop in a small room on the second floor of the 
Erwin block. Then he moved to the White block, se- 
curing two rooms. His business began increasing and 
another move was necessary. This time he opened a 
store at No. 507 Wabash avenue. With a volume of trade 
constantly expanding, larger c|uarters w-ere necessary and 
Mr. Prager opened in his present location. No. 406 Wabash 
avenue, over a year ago. The beauty of the Prager display 
windows excites the attention of every passerljy, testify- 
ing somewhat to the artistic ability of Mr. Prager. His 
artistic temperament is not confined to decorating alone, 
for Mr. Prager is a musician of no mean ability and is an 
accomplished performer on the flute. He is a great lover 
of music and enjoys the acquaintance of a number of 
noted artists. Mr. Prager has been to Europe twice since 
leaving there, making one trip as a representative of the 
H. A. Langton Company and selling gun stocks to the 
war departments of foreign governments. 



EDGAR L. LARKINS 



A S Dr. Larkins is a great lover of cliiliin.'n we are not 
■*^ surprised that his prescriptiuns for tlicm are of a 
mild kind. Nothing would please Johnnie better 
than a box of chocolates or some peanuts when he is suf- 
fering from a badly stubbed toe, and a box of bon-bons 
would be just as suitable for Nellie, if she was compelled 
to remain indoors because she had an attack of the measles. 
Dr. Larkins is just as kind to duinli animals as he is to 
children, and the horse that draws liini about im his calls 
is always sure of good treatment and works just a little 
bit harder on that account. However, we naturally ex- 
pect kindness and sympathy fmni a ]ihysician. Some- 
times his opportunities for hiunanitarian work exceed 
those of the preacher. 

Dr. Larkins can be counted among tlie greal army of 
men who have come to the city from llie farm and are 
filling good positions in the commercial and professional 
worlds. He w-as born in Honey Creek township and did 
not leave the farm until he was twenty years of age. In 
the meantime he had attended the Terrc Haute high 
school and taught school two terms. He was ambitious 
to become a physician and be,gan his studies in the office 
of Dr. Link, remaining with him one year. Then Dr. 
Larkins entered the Medical College of Indiana, graduating 
in 1878. For one year he was associated with Dr. Link 
in the practice of medicine and then located at Staunton, 
Clay county, where he remained five years. He returned 
to Terre Haute at the expiration of that time and has 
been pretty busy ever since administering to the wants 
of the ailing. 

Dr. Larkins is a member of Masonic lodge Xo. 19, and 
Fort Harrison lodge of the t)dd Fellows. His oflices are 
in the Rose Dispensary Ijuilding. 





JAMES A. CRAWFORD 



V^OR several years Mr. Craufcird was tlie only oil mag- 
nate that Terre Haute had, but as the production 
from the local wells did not enable him to monop- 
olize the market as did Mr. Rockefeller, no hard feelings 
exist on the part of the pul)lic. vSincc Mr. Crawford has 
gone out of the oil business he is giving some attention to 
liis ranch in Xorth Dakota. He has always thought pretty 
well of horses and is en,L(ai;in,L,^ in the ranchin.g business on 
an extensive scale in tlie nortlnvcsl. He is alile to tell the 
difference between a Clydesdale and a Shetland, or be- 
tween a Galloway and a hairless Mexican dog. In North 
Dakota he will show the natives liow to raise horses that 
will sell well in the eastern market. 

Mr. Crawford was born and reared in Terre Haute. He 
attended school at Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and on re- 
turning home engaged with his father in the irt)n mill 
business, occujjying the position of shijiping clerk at the 
Wabash Mill from 1891 to 1899. When the Re])ublic Iron 
and Steel Comi)any purchased the Crawford mills, Mr. 
Crawford was puddle boss for the trust until 190.\ when 
they abandoned the plants here. 

Since that time Mr. Crawford has been engaged in the 
oil business and other different enterprises. He is asso- 
ciated with several other prominent Terre Hauteans in 
the North Dakota ranch and will give special attention to 
the breeding of first class horses. Mr. Crawford is a mem- 
ber of Mas(mic lodge No. 19. 



JOHN E. PEYTON 



rAISCRIMIXATING dressers are aware that good shoes 
•^^ are always a requisite. The development in the 
shoe business has been remarkable. It w'as a long 
step from the cowhide boot to the congress shoe and we 
are not surprised now- when we see shoes of all kinds and 
colors. We have the black shoe, the red, the tan and 
the white. There is a foot for every shoe but not a shoe 
for every foot. In some parts of the world the people 
are still going barefooted, but not in Terre Haute. Mr. 
Peyton is one of the shoe dealers who looks especially 
after the wants of the residents of the east end. He 
makes a business of selling shoes imly, and has had ex- 
perience enough to believe that he knows Imw to fit peo- 
ple's feet in good style. 

Mr. Peyton was born on a farm in Parke countv, near 
Belmore, and when six months of age moved into Sul- 
livan county. Here he communed with nature until he 
decided that he would teach school. He attended the 
Central Indiana Normal at Danville and for several winters 
used his knowledge in training the young hopeful in the 
elements of arithmetic, geography, history and other 
branches. Eight years ago Mr, Peyton arrived in Terre 
Haute and went into the wholesale shoe house of J. H. 
O' Boyle. He remained with the firm as shipping clerk 
until it went out of business and then engaged in business 
with his brother, W. P. Peyton, at Paxton, Indiana. A 
fire destroyed their merchandise store and they returned 
to Terre Haute, estabhshing the only exclusive shoe store 
on East Wabash avenue. 

About the biggest hobby Mr. Peyton has is admiration 
of a good horse. He enjoys driving and is usually behind 
a good stepper when business hours are over. He is a 
member of Amico lodge of the Odd Felolws and loyal to 
the interests of the east side. 





SAMUEL D. ROYSE 



1\ /IR. R( )VSE is stuck on the law business. The picture 
slious him in tlial interesting; attitude. 

He determined on tliis jjrofession some time ago 
and was alisent from Terre Haute for several years laying 
tlie foundation for liis legal career. If the reports are 
true wliich cclio from the scliools that Mr. Rosye attended, 
he lias all of the requirements to make him successful. 

Mr. Royse was born in Terre Haute in 1878. He was 
lient on taking advantage of the educational oi)])ortun- 
ities afforded liini and was graduated from the Terre 
Haute high school in 1896. Then he went to Indiana 
University where he spent ime year. Next, Mr. Royse 
entered Amherst College wliere he spent tliree years, grad- 
uating in I'lOO. Mr. Royse was a member of the Delta 
Kappa K]isilon society while at Amherst and was also 
dee])ly interested in atldeties. He played fooll)all on tlie 
college team and also figured in baseball affairs. He re- 
ceived the degree of A. B. at Amherst and in order to oljtain 
his legal education entered Columliia University, from 
which institution lie was graduated in I<)OJ.. Mr. Royse 
was a Plii Delta I'lii at Columbia and was an associate 
editor on tlie Law Review. He returned to Terre Haute 
after his graduation and became a partner with Mr. P. M. 
Foley in the practice of law. 

Mr. Royse is one of the best known young lawyers of 
the town. He is a memlier of the Vouiig Husincss Men's 
Clulj and the Country Club. 



ROY LAWRENCE 



OF all the arts which give the greatest pleasure to tlie 
greatest number the art of music stands first. This 
has been recognized from the earliest days, when 
man learned to play the simple reed pipes and to chant in 
musical numbers his noblest thoughts. The ancients 
rightly recognize a god of music who presided over this 
art and inspired the loftiest strains. There is no doubt if 
one will study the anatomy of the vocal organs and recog- 
nize the wonderful dehcacy and adaptibility of the parts 
which go to form sound, that man has the most wonderful 
musical organ imaginable. Experience has shown that it 
is capable of the highest cultivation. 

There are many who have, both by natural endow- 
ment and long training accomjilished wonderful results. 
Mr. Lawrence is a great lover of music and we are re- 
minded of a very clever iiuisical jiroduction entitled 
"Anchored" which was given by the Elks some few years 
ago. While Mr. Lawrence modestly disclaims any great 
musical talent, he had much to do with directing the re- 
hearsals and bringing about the results that made the 
piece a hit with the public. The artist has caught Mr. 
Lawrence as he might have appeared in the role of musical 
director. 

It has not been so very long ago since Mr. Lawrence 
came to Terre Haute. To be exact he made his appear- 
ance here September 19th, 1880. Like all boys, he at- 
tended the graded schools, and like a great many other 
boys, he attended the high scliool, but did not wait for a 
diploma. Upon leaving school Mr. Lawrence went into 
business with his father and is now secretary and treasurer 
of the Terre Haute Laundry and Dyeing Company. Just 
recently he took unto himself a wife, Miss Catherine Scott 
Braman, one of Terre Haute's best known young women. 
Mr. Lawrence is a jiopular member of the local lodge of 
Elks. 





FRANK M. BUCKINGHAM 



pRANK M. BUCKINGHAM, city clerk and ex-ufficio 

ccimptrdller, luid a narrow escape from becoming; an 

actor. Becanse a diet of grease, ])aint and make-up 

material did not agree with Frank, he left the glare of the 

calcium and decided to work for a living. 

Undoubtedly possessed of histrionic ability, it was ])er- 
ha])s fortunate for Mr. Buckingham that liis first experi- 
ence on the road with a ten-twenty-tliirty-cent aggrega- 
tion was disastrous. It is more prulilaljle to be city clerk 
than to win the plaudits of the "hoi poUoi" in such pro- 
ductions as "Hobbies," "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-Ay," "Con- 
fusion" and "A Texas Steer." 

Mr. Buckingham is^not averse to telling liis age. He 
was born in 1868. He coni])lcted his work in tlie common 
grades and was in the liigh school just one day. After 
being reprimanded for his failure to get a Latin lesson 
Mr. Buckingham secured a business college training and 
tackled life with a vengeance. For several years lie was 
a bookkeeper in well known establishments and was ap- 
pointed deputy clerk under William Hamilton in 1898. 

In \W2 he was the choice of tlie repul)licans for the 
position of city clerk and coni|itroUer and was re-elected 
in 1904. Mr. Hamilton has managed tlie affairs of the 
office in a very satisfactory manner. 

He finds his greatest recreation in hunting and fishing 
and when the opportunity ofl'crs, is out with rofl and gun. 
He is a popular Elk and is a member of the Uniform Rank 
of tlie Knights of Pythias. 



OMAR CONDIT MEWHINNEY 



X TO organization in recent years has enlisted such hearty 
■'• ^ support from the young men of the city as the 
Young Business Men's Club. The club has an influence 
that is greatly felt in affairs municipal. Its object, that 
of promoting more sociable relations among the younger 
business men, has been already fulfilled, though its organ- 
ization dates back but a little over one year. Mr. Mew- 
hinney, whom we see here in the president's chair, was 
one of five young men to promote the formation of the 
club and was its first presiding officer. 

Mr. Mewhinney was born in Indianapolis but came to 
the "Pittsburg of the West" when he was in short dresses. 
He received his education at tlie high solionl and tlie Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, graduating from the latter scliool 
in 1891 in the mechanical engineering course. He en- 
gaged in the manufacturing business with his father im- 
mediately afterward, the A. B. Mewhinney Comi^any 
now being recognized as one of tlie largest candy manu- 
facturing establishments in the middle west. ( )\er one 
hundred and fifty persons are given employment and a 
fine grade of confectioners' goods is turned out. The 
product is to be found in every part of the United States, 
the chocolate creams achieving a reputation second to none 
other. Mr. Mewhinney is vice-president uf the company 
and is also vice-president of the Mewhinney Land Com- 
pany. 

The technical training received by .Mr. Mewhinney has 
been put into ])ractical use in the management and con- 
duct of the factory, the entire steam plant having been 
installed under his supervision. Mr. Mewhinney is a 
member of the Masonic lodge, No. 19. He enjoys hunting 
and fishing and indulges in these sports whenever the 
opportunity is afforded. 





JOHN W. PARKS 



]\ /IR. PARKS, cliief ck'rk in the otTice of su])erintendent 
of motive jiower of llie \'andalia, has been caught 
by the artist taking a momentary rest. He has 
probably just finislied making out a re<|uisition for a lot 
of new material wliich will include a Imnch of car wheels, 
an engine or two and some new working tools. There is 
a whole lot to look after in the railroad liusiness and in 
this particular olTice Mr. Parks engineers matters very 
evenly. 

Mr. Parks' cxjierience lias been Hke that of a great many 
other railroad men who have stuck witli the liusiness and 
have been looking ahead to better things and ])laccs of 
greater responsibility. His railroad work began in the 
vicinity of his birthplace, I'hrichsville, I )liio, in the famed 
Tuscarawas valley. When he decided to lie a railroad 
man he began at the l)ottom. He accepted a position as 
a lilacksmith's helper m the Dennison shops of the Pennsy 
system in 1891. He kept his eyes open and made Iiimscif 
valuable. Mr. Parks was selected as the man to inlrodiicc 
the piece work system in the ^■andalia shojjs liere and 
began his task in 1897. The oflicials were so well pleased 
with him that lie was |)romotcd to the ])osition of store- 
keeper at the shops. Next he was chief clerk to the mas- 
ter mechanic and became Mr. Arp's right hand man in 
June, 1901. 

Mr. Parks is almost too busy to indulge in any holibies 
and is thoroughly in love with the railroad business He 
has many good friends and recently became a member 
of Social Lodge of the Masons. 



JAMES E. PIETY 



JUDGE PIETY began the study of law after having 
acquired a knowledge of agriculture and some experi- 
ence as a country school teacher in Illinois. When he 
began the perusal of Blackstone in the law office of Colden 
& Wilkin at Marshall, Illinois, he had received a training 
that fitted him very well for the profession he had in view. 
That he has succeeded is shown by his elevation to a place 
of dignity, authority and grave responsibihty. 

Judge Piety is a native of Prairie Creek township, having 
been born there in 1857. When he was eighteen years of 
age he went to Valparaiso where he entered tlie Normal 
school and prepared himself for teaching. For tlie next 
five or six years he taught school in Illinois and then began 
to study law. He passed the reciuired examination before 
the supreme court of Illinois and located in Terre Haute. 
For one year he was in the office of Davis & Davis and 
then formed a partnership with Attorney J. P. Stunkard. 
He was elected prosecutor by tlie repubhcans in 1888 and 
when his term expired became a partner with his brother, 
Attorney J. O. Piety. This partnership was continued 
until Mr. Piety was elected circuit court judge in Novem- 
ber, 1896. He was again honored by the voters of the 
county in 1902. During the nine years that Judge Piety 
has been on the bench he has not had a decision reversed 
by the supreme court, and l)ut two by the appellate court. 
The civil, criminal, probate and juvenile business of the 
court has grown with the increasing population of the city 
and has given the judge a vast amount of work, but he 
has remained the same — always genial, courteous and 
gracious. 

The judge is a lover of hunting and fishing and enjoys 
these recreations during his vacations. He is a niemlier 
of Euclid lodge of the Masons, is a Knight Templar, an 
Odd Fellow and of the Elks lodge. No. 86. 





THOMAS R. WOODBURN 



TALK is cheap. Xnt all kinds of talk, nor too much of 
the right kind, Imt just enough. A good salesman 
can use the right kind of a talk to a prospective cus- 
tomer, but when he comes to put that talk into print he is 
unable to present it in as forcible a manner as when he is 
face to face with the customer. Mr. Woodburn can pre- 
sent your talk in a printed form that will be convincing 
and to the point ; that will sell your goods just as well as 
your good salesman can and at less expense. A good talk 
is not necessarily a business-getter just because it is 
printed, but its value, Mr. Woodburn will tell you, de- 
pends entirely upon how it is printed. It makes no dif- 
ference how good your argument is, if it is talked or 
printed poorly, it is expensive ; but if it is talked or printed 
right, no matter what it costs, it is cheap. 

Mr. Woodburn has been identified with the ])rinting 
business ever since he was a boy, and as secretary and 
treasurer of the Viquesney Printing Company keeps ham- 
mering away at the doctrine of judicious and good print- 
ing. The \'ic|uesney Company, of which Mr. Bert Viques- 
ney is president, has had a remarkable growth in the time 
that it has been established. Binding, printing and blank 
book work are the S])ecialties and excellent facilties for 
turning out all kinds of ledger, journal, rule book, and 
catalog work, has given a great impetus to the business. 
The volume of trade at the new printery has increased five 
times since the first wheel was turned, and new machinery 
has been added almost monthly. Printing is secured in 
twelve difl'erent counties and a specialty is also made of 
railroad printing. 

Mr. Woodburn, whom you see here giving some timely 
advice about your stationary, was born in Clay City, but 
has hved in Terre Haute since he was a small boy. Im- 
mediately n]xm leaving the high school he became asso- 
ciated with Mr. Vi(iuesney and has served a thorough 
apprenticeship. Mr. Woodburn is identified with tlic 
Young Business Men's Club, the Manufacturers Club and 
is also an Odd Fellow, being a member of Amico lodge. 



OXIC would naturally think that a dealer in seeds would 
know a lot about growing them, but Frank Hoer- 
niann Ijlushes when any mention is made of the 
famous onion ])atch that he was interested in two years 
ago. 

He associated himself with two other well known busi- 
ness men in this venture and ten acres of onions were 
planted. A small army of boys set out the onions and 
after several strikes the mammoth task was accomplished. 
For a time the onions were cultivated and then the owners 
waited just long enough to give the weeds a chance. A 
mower was run over the patch two or three times but the 
deadly weeds had gotten in their work and visions of an 
income passed away. The following year, another man 
who rented the same ground reaped a harvest of young 
onions and profited from the labors of those who were out 
the rent and the sets. The onion sets were good, how- 
ever, for it is an old saving that "'if it's from Hoermann. 
it's good." 

Frank Hoermann was born in the state of Wuerttemberg, 
near Heilbronn, Germany. He came to the United States 
when he was fifteen years old believing that greater oppor- 
tunities existed in the land of your Uncle Samuel. His 
judgment proved very good. He first located at Law- 
rence, Kansas, entering the employ of an uncle, and after 
six months in the land of Sockless Simpson he came to 
Terre Haute. As a boy he sold newspapers in Terre Haute 
and worked for a while in one of the overall factories. In 
1890 he secured employment with J. A. Foote, who was 
conducting a seed store on Ohio street. In 1898 Mr. 
Hoermann and Mr. John Cleary purchased the store from 
Mr. Foote and continued in partnership until 1903, when 
Mr. Cleary retired. Frank Hoermann has met with good 
success in the wholesale and retail seed business and 
everyone who knows him admits that he is deserving of 
it. He is deputy grand knight of the Knights of Colundius, 
a member of the Young Men's Institute, the Commercial 
Club and the Retail Merchants Association. 




MALACHl R. COMBS 




T^HE artist has emphasized the mightiness of the sword 
•*■ in the case of Dr. Conilis. It's an old law that the 
pen is mightier llian the afore-mentioned weapon, 
but no question has ever lieen raised about the efficiency 
of the surgeon's knife. Dr. Combs does not perform 
operations with this sword. It was given to him in an 
interstate contest of the uniform rank companies of tlu- 
Knights of Pythias at San Antonio, Texas. As a lover of 
mihtary tactics, Dr. Combs takes first rank among the 
physicians, being one of the most active members of Com- 
pany No. 83, Knights of Pythias. 

Dr. Combs had the good fortune of being born in ( )hic> 
but congratulates himself that he had the lietter fortune 
of becoming a resident of the old Hoosier state. He was 
born at Hamilton, but moved to Indiana with his parents 
when he was very small. He located at Mulljerry, near 
Frankfort, and attended the high school in the latter city. 
He was a student at Butler college, Irvington, for a time 
and secured his medical education at Rush Medical Col- 
lege, Chicago, and the Indiana Medical College at Indian- 
apoUs, graduating from Indiana Medical in 1885. He 
began his practice at Kentland, but on account of poor 
health went to sunny Texas, where he built up a nice 
practice at Dallas. It was shortly after the World's Fair 
at Chicago that he visited Terre Haute and decided to 
make this his home. 

While in Texas tlie doctor was captain of both tlie 
Dallas and San Antonio companies. Knights of Pythias. 
He had organized and captained the Kentland Company 
and when becoming a Terre Hautean was soon the captain 
of No. 8.1. He has participated as commanding officer in 
prize drills at Indianapohs, Detroit and San Francisco. 
The doctor is a Mason and also an Elk. He is a lover of 
all outdoor sports and is a dyed-in-the-wool baseball fan. 



WICKLIFFE P. RAY 



■ I 'HERErare'still a'number of persons who enjoy riding 
in a vehicle that has for its motive power a good 
looking horse. The automobile has not put the 
carriage dealers out of business by a long way. The very 
fact that there is a greater demand than ever for high 
class vehicles shows that the autos are not decreasing the 
jjopularity of the carriage, and it isn't old-fashioned by 
any means to be caught riding in a Stanhope as we see 
Mr. Ray. To be frank about it, there are any number of 
persons who wouldn't mind owning most any kind of a 
carriage that would take them out into the country where 
a sniff of real fresh air can be had. 

For nineteen years Mr. Ray lived on a farm in Riley 
township and then he came to the \'i,go metropolis. He 
spent one year in tlie lii,i,'h sclmol and tlien joined his 
father at Indianapolis in tlie live stuck l)usiness. Con- 
cluding that Terre Haute was a good place to live in, Mr. 
Ray returned six years ago. As a salesman he was em- 
ployed with Fonts & Hunter for two years, with another 
firm for one year and then went into the vehicle business 
with his brother, Frank Ray. The firm met with success 
from the start and the Wabash avenue repository is now 
the largest in the city. Four floors are utilized and the 
best grade of vehicles is to lie found in the Ray establish- 
ment. A line of light farming implements is carried but 
a specialty is made in the selling of vehicles made by the 
best known manufacturers. 

Mr. Ray was born on Washington's birthday in 1877, 
and is intensely patriotic as a consequence. He is a well 
known member of the Elks, No. 86, and of Amico lodge 
of Odd Fellows. 




§?Mj3 



f 




ALEXANDER G. GAVINS 



13 ENOWN and fame were achieved in a single day by 
■^ ^ Mr. Cavins during the session of the Indiana Senate 
last winter. Some other senator had proposed an 
amendment to a bill which pertained to the quahfications 
of voters, when Senator Cavins, in a jocular mood, pro- 
posed that the word "male" be stricken out. His sug- 
gestion was greeted with applause and when the feminine 
population learned of the senator's motion he became the 
most popular representative in the Indiana Legislature. 
The measure came very near passing as Mr. Cavins sug- 
gested, and the men of Indiana had a narrow escape. 

Had Mr. Cavins tried ever so hard he could not have 
avoided being a lawyer. Several members of the Cavins 
family have been distinguished lawyers in southern Indi- 
ana. They have made their mark in the world as success- 
ful practitioners. Mr. Cavins was born in Sullivan county. 
He attended Wabash College and began the study of law 
in the offices of Hays & Bays in Sullivan. He gained his 
first renown as a ])oUtician by making a remarkable race 
for the office of prosecutor when he was nominated by tlie 
repubUcans of Sullivan and Greene counties. Mr. Cavins 
was barely jjast twenty-one years of age; he had just been 
admitted to the bar and his candidacy was taken as a joke 
by a great many people. The young attorney was in a 
hopelessly democratic community, but he started to mak- 
ing speeches and shaking hands. The results were very 
gratifying when the votes were counted. Mr. Cavins ran 
1,100'votes ahead of Mr. McKinley, but failed to get the 
office. 

The senator came to Terre Haute in 1X06, forming a 
partnershi]) with Attorney Alvin M. Higgins. He was 
elected county chairman in 1902 by the republicans and 
conducted a vigorous campaign. In 1904 he was elected 
state senator by a comfortable majority. As a senator he 
occupies places on several important committees, among 
them the educational. His wife was formerly Miss Alice 
Weinstein, of Terre Haute. He is the father of two pretty 
children. He enjoys "playing with the baby" and this is 
one of his greatest hobbies. 



WILLIAM L. ARNETT 



S( ) far no one has had to put his effects into the city 
liall and go to jail for lodgings. There are too many 
real estate men in Terre Haute to permit of anything 
like this happening, though it is admitted that frequently 
it looks as though Terre Haute would experience a house 
famine. Mr. Arnett is one of the men whose business it 
is to encourage the buying of lots and the building of 
houses. He does not believe in exaggeration but talks 
hopefully of Terre Haute because of its unbounded re- 
sources — its manufacturing, its healthfulness and a hun- 
dred and one other things that make it a desirable city in 
which to live. After you have bought a lot, and built 
the house, Mr. Arnett will insure you against any possible 
loss by fire, water or tornado. This is his business and 
he does not care who knows it. 

Perhaps you have noticed that Mr. Arnett is a very 
healthy looking real estate man. He took a course in 
physical culture down in Sullivan county. In fact he was 
born on a farm in that county and remained tliere until 
he was twenty years of age. He attended a commercial 
college in Terre Haute and his first office position was witli 
C. C. Smith & Sons. Mr. Arnett was with tliis firm for 
five years, accepting a position next with the I. H. C. 
Royse Company. He gained his first knowledge of real 
estate and insurance with this firm. In 1901 he accepted 
his present position with Mr. J. A. Dailey, having charge 
of the insurance, rental and real estate end of the business. 
Mr. Arnett is one of the dealers who believes in advertising 
just what he has for sale and thinks the liargains should 
be just a little bit better than advertised. He has met 
with good success in his special line. 

Mr. Arnett is a member of Euclid lodge of the Masons, 
Amico lodge of the Odd Fellows, the Encampment and 
Vigo Tent No. 43 of the Maccabees. He is not a faddist 
in any sense and likes baseball somewliat better than any 
other outdoor game. 





JAMES S. BARCUS 



WHILE tlie American Publishers Association has 
heaped honors upon him, while political recogni- 
tions galore have been showered at his feet, while 
lawmakers and the tribunes of the people have lavished 
him with evidences of confidence and regard, while public 
gatherings at home and abroad have hung on words and 
been swayed by the mastery of his pen, still Senator James 
S. Barcus is now and ever will be known as the first presi- 
dent of the Terre Haute Press Club. History has been 
interrupted by one banquet of the club, just one, and the 
senator paid the deficit. Thus is explained the potent 
fame that sends his name echoing down the corridors of 
time, the Charybdis tliat engulfs all other fames. Greece 
has had her Demosthenes; Rome, her Cicero; England, her 
Burke and Pitt ; Columbia, her Webster and IngersoU. 

But none of these can lay claim to the two distinctions 
of having been a foremost statesman and at the same time 
serving the Terre Haute Press Club as her president. 

Mr. Barcus is a native of Sullivan county, Indiana. His 
early days on the rostrum of the little red school house 
teaching the young idea how to shoot was an admirable 
training, fitting him for the greater world of business and 
statecraft in which he soon found himself launched. Even 
with his vast publishing business in New York, Mr. Barcus 
finds much time to give his newspaper property in Terre 
Haute, the Tribune-Gazette, and three times he has 
entered the arena of Fifth district politics as a candidate 
for the nomination for congressman by the republican 
party. His achievements in the general assembly, namely 
his banking law, his primary reform election law, his public 
health law, his railroad rate legislation enactment, all 
serve to illumine a brilliant career. Mr. Barcus threatens 
to usurp Chauncey M. Depew's positicm as the ideal post- 
prandial orator and his graceful and deUghtful efforts in 
this direction have made liini a favorite at social gather- 
ings. With all this, Mr. Barcus takes time to be a friend. 
Those who have enjoyed the privilege of knowing this side 
of the man, pledge tlieir word it is as consistent and as 
readilv shared as Providence's own free air. 



WILLIAM H. BOYLL 



IV /IR. BOVLI. is one of the three members of the board 
of safety. A\'e see him here looking over the speci- 
fications for the paving of East Wabash avenue. 
Eighty years ago there was no board of safety and little 
thought had been given to paving of any kind, for Terre 
Haute was then but a pioneer settlement. East Wabash 
avenue was merely a straggling path, according to early 
historians, and a log cabin here and there was the most 
pretentious structure. Time, of course, has wrought 
wonderful changes. The straggling path liecame the 
National road, and the road became one of the principal 
thoroughfares of a thriving and bustling city. Now, the 
board will see that the street is paved with brick made 
from the best of \'igo county clay, and apologies to visitors 
regarding the appearance of the street will no longer be 
necessary. 

Mr. BovU was burn in Linton townshi]) in 1856. He 
milked the cows, fed the stock, laid by tlie corn and helped 
in the harvest field until he was a l>oy of fifteen. Then 
he went into the lirick and tile business for six years. 
After disposing of his interests in this line, he moved to 
Terre Haute and since then has been engaged in street 
building and excavating work, being in the employ of 
Foulkes & Forkes, well known contractors, for some time. 
Mr. Boyll was appointed to his present position on the 
board by Mayor Bidaman in 1904. Since the new Ijoard 
members were appointed to their places a great number 
of improvements have started and are now under way 
that will add to the attractiveness of Terre Haute as an 
up-to-date city. 





GEORGE 



LINTS 



DKIXG the chief uf poHce in a city of sixty thousand 
people is no sinecure, es])eciaUy when there are "hds" 
t(i l>e put on, vice to be cliecked, and criminals to be 
run down 

George M. Lints became a jiatrolman in 1892, being 
apjiointed by the board wliich was com])osed of Jacob 
Kolseni, Jacob Early and Matthew Sankey. He has 
tramped the streets day and night, througli wet weather 
and through dry, for fourteen years as one of the guardians 
of the public safety, and the big star which he is now 
wearing fits very well. It is a poor sort of a ]ioliceman 
who does not hope some day to rise from the ranks and 
with the future in view the patrolman who became superin- 
tendent has always endeavored to do his duty. 

The cliief was born in Terre Haute in 1867. After 
graduating from the graded schools he s])ent seven years 
as a miller, learning his trade at Kidder Brothers' mill. 
For a time he was engaged in the grocery business with his 
brother at the corner of Thirtcneth and Colle.ge streets, 
and left that business to accei)t a ]jlace cm the force. In 
1901 Patrolman Lints became Sergeant Lints, and when 
Mayor Bidaman was elected to olVice the sergeant was the 
choice for superintendent. 

W'lien the great wave of reform swept over Terre Haute 
in I'lO.S (and there arc a few who can yet remember it) the 
duties of the chief trebled. So f;ir, Cliief Lints has arisen 
to evcrv eiTiergency and has not hesitated to carry out 
the orders of his superiors, who nuist Ldw;iys in a measure 
lie inlluenced by the |)eoi)le when reforms are wanted. 



ABRAHAM L. MILLER 



""PHIS gentleman with the three Unks is a lawyer, but is 
interested in welding the chain nmre hrinly in spite 
of the fact that it is somewhat antagonistic to his 
profession. This is the third year that Mr. Miller has 
served as district deputy grand master of the Odd Fellows 
and he seems to fill the positicm so well that there is no 
immediate prospect of a chan,s;e. He has general super- 
vision of sixteen suliordinate lodges and eleven Rebekah 
lodges, representing a total mcnibershi]j running into the 
thousands. 

In the morn of bovhi>od Mr. Miller received his first 
exercise on a farm near Rockvillc. He jilanted corn and 
he shucked it, he sowed wheat and he reaped it, and by 
thus doing made for himself a rug.ged constitution. This 
same constitution enabled him a few years later to com- 
mand the respect of the biggest and meanest boy in tlic 
school room and he was never worried liy a lack of disci- 
pline when he taught his four terms in I\\rke county. 
While he was teaching school Mr. Miller |)rocured a copy 
of Blackstone and began the study of law. He had at- 
tended the Danville Normal scliool two years and when 
he had progressed far enough in his legal studies, he re- 
turned to Danville, making two years in one and grad- 
uating in 1896. He began the practice of his profession 
in Terre Haute. He was first identified with the law firm 
of Crane, Miller & Miller, and formed his present partner- 
ship in 1901. Mr. Miller has devoted a large part of his 
practice to abstracts, real estate and commercial law. 

.\s mentioned before, Mr. Miller's greatest hobby is Odd 
Fellowism, and he fills a valuable place in the ranks of the 
organization which promotes Friendship, Love and Truth. 





JOHN T. BEASLEY 



■ I 'HIS picture shows Mr. Beasley in the role of toast- 
■*■ master. His theme is a "Greater Terre Haute," 
and it meets with favor. Mr. Beasley has always 
been optimistic about the old town and his predictions 
about the city's future seem correct. Foi" five years Mr. 
Beasley served as president of the Commercial Club and 
he is in a position to know what the future holds in store, 
if energies are expended in the right direction. 

Mr. Beasley is one of the busiest men in Terre Haute 
and this is one reason why he has met with success in his 
profession as well as in other lines. He was born on a 
farm in Sullivan county in 1860, and began teaching in 
the country schools at the age of sixteen. In 1880 he 
removed to the town of Sullivan and began the study of 
law in the office of Buff & Patten, being admitted to the 
liar in 1881. He was a member of the firm of Buff & 
Patten first and later purchased the interest of his part- 
ners, and then associated himself with Mr. A. R. Williams, 
the firm name being Beasley & Williams. The firm re- 
moved to Indianapolis in 189j, where Messrs. Beasley & 
Williams dissolved partnership. Mr. Beasley then ac- 
cepted partnership with Mr. John E. Lamb of this city. 
Judge A. C. Sawyer became a member of the firm recently. 
Mr. Beasley has given much of his attention to corpora- 
tion law. Industry and close application have given him 
an enviable place among the lawyers of the state. 

He has served three terms in the Indiana legislature, 
representing Sullivan, \'igo and \'ermiUion counties in 
1886, and Sullivan county in 1889 and 1891. During his 
legislative experience he was prominent as a leader on the 
democratic side of the house. Mr. Beasley is president of 
the Ignited States Trust Company, a trustee of the Savings 
bank and a director in several of the largest corporations 
in the city. He is a member of the board of the Rose 
Orphan Home and also a member of the board of directors 
of the Young Men's Christian Association. 



ALBERT ZABRISKIE FOSTER 



|V yiR. FOSTER is not a bit tliat way, but his middle 
■^'■^ name smacks just a little of aristocracy. The 
Zabriskies were a noted Polish family of noble blood 
that emigrated to New Jersey a number of years ago. The 
Fosters knew the Zabriskies, and hence the name for the 
son. Not a few had guessed the "Z" li> stand fur Zech- 
ariah. Mr. Foster has no end of fun in receiving his mail. 
Letters are addressed to Mr. A. IV, Mr. .A. C, Mr. A. W., 
etc. When the postoffice clerks are in doulit thev send 
the letter to Mr. Foster. 

Mr. Foster is a native of Orange county, New York, one 
of the good old counties in the Empire state that is noted 
for good liutter and other dairy products. The Foster 
brothers llourished on the healthful farm diet and each 
one of tliem grew up to be a sucessful Ijusiness man. Mr. 
Foster began his mercantile career in Brooklyn, New York, 
estaWishing a dry goods store there and being associated 
with an older brother. Later he was engaged in business 
with another brother at Troy, New York. He came west 
in 1875 with his brother, Scott Foster, and together they 
established the Foster dry goods and carpet house. In 
1886 the store became a house furnishing establishment 
in the broadest sense, and dry goods were no longer 
handled. The simiharity in appearance of Samuel M. 
Foster, of Fort Wayne, and his brother here, is very 
marked and has been commented <in lre(|ufntlv in the 
two cities. 

Mr. Foster has no pronounced hobbies. He enjoys a 
good baseball game and plays golf at the Country Club. 
He does not claim to be any better at golfing than Mr. 
Spencer fSall, who thus far has won no red ribbons. When 
fish bite real well Mr. Foster enjoys fishing, but as for 
hunting he has never cared much for that sport. About 
the worst thing that can be said of Mr. Foster is that he 
is arleniocrat. He is a member of the Commercial Club, 
the Country Cluli and F'ort Harrison Clul), and is thor- 
oughly identified with those tilings tliat hel]) Terre Haute. 





GEORGE M. CRANE 



HA\'E you ever noticed that many of our best lawyers 
passed through the Hosoier school master period 
before they finally chose their profession? It seems 
that when a voung man succeeds in convincing a roomful 
of odds and ends of households that the world isn't flat 
and that the cube root hasn't any connection with botany, 
he rightly thinks he is pretty well equipped to convince a 
jury on almost any proposition which could possibly bob 
up for solution. That was the way with George Crane. 
He taught the youngsters of various counties in Indiana, 
IlUnois and Texas before being admitted to practice law. 

Mr. Crane was born in Rush county, Indiana, and lived 
on a farm until he was almost of age. In the meantime 
he had begun teaching school. He studied law in the 
offices of Morgan & Morris in Rushville and was admitted 
to the bar in Rush county. He was united in marriage 
in 1889 with Miss Florence Maloy, of Scottsburg, Indiana. 
On account of Mrs. Crane's failing health Mr. and Mrs. 
Crane were in Texas for sonic time, Mr. Crane tcacliing 
school in that state. Mrs. Crane's death occurred in 
Texas in 1892. Mr. Crane came to Terre Haute the same 
year and went into the office of Judge Mack, remaining 
until the death of Judge Mack in 1898. The law firm of 
Henry, Crane & Miller was then established. Mr. Crane, 
in addition to following the profession of law, has been 
interested in several enterprises. He was one of the pro- 
moters of beautiful Forest Park, and is secretary of the 
Forest Park Company. He is also secretary of the W'alhs 
Stoker Company and secretary of the Iwiard of nKina.gers 
of Rose Polytechnic Institute. 

Mr. Crane is a great admirer of the Wabasli river and 
is a ])art owner of the Bunangie, a pleasure craft, and the 
first gasoline launch seen on the river. The river is Mr. 
Crane's hobby and he rightfully terms the stream one of 
great beauty, and deserving of its fame in song and story. 



JOHN LLOYD DAVIS 



HFIRE is line Terre Hautean who has successfully com- 
bined railroading and music. Mr. Davis, while a 
liiver 111' the melody that comes from the singing 
wires of the telegraph, has cultivated his own ability along 
this line and harmony has been the result. 

It was only recently that the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
railroad made a demand on Terre Haute for Mr. Davis and 
he is now a denizen of the Windy City, being superintend- 
ent of the telegraph and signal department of this part of 
the Frisco system. Mr. Davis is the only one of the six 
Davis brothers, so well known here, who was born in Terre 
Haute. He sang his first song in Terre Haute thirty-two 
years ago. His music was not appreciated so much then 
as it is now. In fact, without any cultivation, Mr. Davis 
sang lustily at times and traces of baritone could, even at 
so early a date, be discovered in his voice. Mr. Davis was 
graduated from the public schools into the telegraph 
offices of the Vandalia, becoming an operator under the 
tutelage of Mr. \\". ^^■. Bay. His first position was at the 
metropolis of Seelyville and he even held down the keys 
at the "Van" gravel pit for a time. For a while lie was 
in the office of Superintendent Elliott, of the main line, 
and was then promoted to the position of dispatcher. Mr. 
Davis was well fitted to become chief dispatcher when a 
vacancy took place and he was promoted again. He held 
this responsible position imtil he was asked to accept the 
superintendency of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois tele- 
graph and signal system. This position is a fitting recog- 
nition of Mr. Davis' ability and is a fine advancement, 
his new position giving him complete control of this im- 
portant department of the Chicago & Eastern Illinois 
system. 

During the St. Louis World's Fair Mr. Davis read a 
paper on the block signal system which attracted much 
atention and gave him an enviable place among the rail- 
road men of the country. Music is Mr. Davis' hobliy and 
he is also a lover of clean outdoor sports. 




SAMUEL C. BROWN 




[V /IR. HROW'X is not a "hdt air" artist in the niixlern 
^^ ^ acceptance of tlie term, but he is in the hot air busi- 
ness to some extent. He has done a good deal to 
bring comfort into the homes of Terre Haute. It is only 
when the mercury creejis down and tries to get out of the 
cold into the buUi that people liegin to appreciate their 
good fortune in having secured tlie proper kind of a fur- 
nace, installed by a man who knows his business and does 
it well. We see Mr. Brown here throwing some fuel into 
"Brown's Hustler" hot blast furnace. 

Mr. Brown was l5orn near the Mammoth Cave, at the 
little town of Scottshurg, in Kentucky, and came north 
with his father when he was six years of age, locating in 
Newton, Illinois. Mr. Brown resided at Newton until he 
was twenty-three years of age and was later located in the 
towns of Mt. \'crnon, Indiana, and Robinson, Ilhnois, 
coming from tlie latter place to Terre Haute eighteen years 
ago. He was witli the Townley Mantle and Furnace Com- 
pany first, and traveled on the road as a hardware sales- 
man for three years, representing a Chicago firm. When 
Mr. Brown (|uit the road he assisted in the organization 
of the Terre Haute Stove and Furnace Company in 1897. 
being treasurer and manager of the company. A large 
business is done in the general hardware line and a specialty 
is made of furnaces. "Brown's Hustler" embodies the 
ideas of Mr. Brown in mudern heating and he gives most 
of his attention to tliis end of the 1)usiness. 

Tlic ]ir(iblcin of chillilains and frost-bitten ears came 
early to Mr. Brown, as lie was oljliged to begin hustling 
just as soon as he got out of school. So it is c|uite natural 
that he should drift into the hot-air business. He is a 
member of Occidental lodge of tlic Knights of Pythias and 
the Modern Woodmen. 



EDWARD 



SPARKS 



TN fair weather and bad the real estate man is busy. He 
is one of the most hopeful of men and always has a 

deep and abiding faith in his home town. Terre Haute 
would be dull at times without the real estate man. He 
is responsible for people owning homes and will make 
terms so easy and convenient that you can't resist him. 
\\'e have a good view here of one of the younger insurance 
and real estate men of the town, Mr. Sparks. If you want 
further particulars regarding this modern ei.ght room 
dwelhng, against which he is leaning, just call at the offices 
of Sparks and Walsh in the Arcade building. 

Mr. Sparks could have been a lawyer just as well as a 
real estate man, l>ut he preferred the hustling which 
brings him out into the sunlight and fresh air. Mr. 
Sparks was born in \"ermillion county, near Clinton, on 
the site of the Old Indiana Furnace, which was run for a 
number of years by his father, George B. Sparks. He 
left the site of the old blast furnace wlien he was eight 
vears old and moved to Clinton. Then he be.gan his 
school career, going to Xotre Dame University three years 
and to Purdue University three years. \\'ell equipped 
with a scientific and literary training, he then entered 
the Indiana Law School at Indianapolis, and was grad- 
uated from that institution in 1899. Mr. Sparks began 
the practice of law at Clinton, and opened an office here 
in 1901. In March of the present year he formed a part- 
nership with Fred J. Walsh for the purpose of conducting 
a fire insurance and real estate business. The firm is one 
of the youngest and best known in the city. Mr. Sparks 
is also secretary of the People's Building and Loan Associa- 
tion which has its offices in the Arcade building. 





JACOB EDGAR MECHLING 



MR. MECHLING, whom we see issuing orders for the 
repairs of locomotives and cars, is the master me- 
chanic of the \'andalia lines. He has been with 
the Pennsylvania system ])racticallv all of his life and even 
when breakdowns in his deixirtment have become epi- 
demic, he has managed to keep in good humor. Mr. 
Melching does not like to pick up a report and read any- 
thing that reflects on his department and for that reason 
is pretty busy seeing that the engines and cars are in first- 
class shape. 

Butler, Pennsylvania, is the birth]5lace of Mr. Mechling. 
He quit the public schools there to accept a place as ap- 
prentice in the H. K. Porter Locomotive Works at Pitts- 
burg, which really marked the first stej) he took in a rail- 
road career. After nearlv three vears in tlie locomotive 
works he took a position witli the Pennsy in the Twenty- 
Eighth street shops of the road at Pittslnirg, and finished 
his trade. For four years he was a machinist with the 
Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul road, being located at 
Milwaukee and at Wells, Minnesota. He returned to 
Pittsburg from the west and became a machinist with the 
Pennsy, but before three months had expired received a 
promotion. He was a gang foreman for a time, then a 
round house foreman, filling the latter position ten years, 
at Wall, Pennsylvania. Next he became assistant master 
mechanic at Pittsburg, and was promoted to his present 
position with the Vandalia at Terre Haute May 1, 1904. 
Mr. Mechling is in charge of the locomotives and car shops 
at all of the different points on the Vandalia and is well 
fitted by his years of practical experience for the place. 
As a testimonial of the esteem in w'hich he was held by 
the employes of the Pennsy at Wilmerding, Mr. Mechling 
wears a handsome gold watch and chain, given him at a 
public reception which rivaled anything ever seen in the 
railroad suburban town of Pittsburg. 

Mr. Mechling is a member of the Masonic lodge No. 45, 
Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and is one of the most popular 
officials the company has in Terre Haute. 



GEORGE ADOLPH GAGG 



"I have heard the roar and clamor throiigli the city's 

crowded ways, 
Of the never-ending pageant moving down the busy days; 
Coaches, wagons, hearses, engines, clanging cars and drays. 
I have watched them moving past me as the day began 

to dawn ; 
I have watched them creeping imward when the sun's 

last light was gone. 
Like a serpent long and sinuous, ghding on, and on, and on." 

WE have caught the "Major" in meditation, in repose. 
He is thinking of that "dear old New York." To 
some it is but a great commercial center, thronged 
by day, thronged by night, a cyclopean inferno with a 
blue sky, into which, each morning, from all points of the 
compass, including Jersey City, Hock hordes of human 
beings, to scheme and fight and prevaricate for gold. But 
to Major Gagg New York is different. Perhaps you have 
never been on the Rialto and met the congenial souls that 
are to be found there. And again perhaps you have 
missed entirely the pleasure of the httle cafes, Bohemian, 
where the newspaper cult gather and discuss a philosophy 
unknown to the "hoi poUoi." 

It was from 1902 to 1904 that Mr. Gagg became so 
intimate with New York. During that time he was branch 
manager for the Eastern Trust Company at Herald Square. 
A great many of his depositors were actors and the friend- 
ships that he formed were among the best known members 
of the profession. Knowing actors and newspaper men 
has been a hobby with Mr. Gagg and we do not wonder at 
his love of the Rialto. Terre Haute was gladdened by the 
return of Mr. Gagg in 1904. when he took charge of the 
Wabash Realty and Loan Company, a million dollar cor- 
poration, that has its offices m the new otlice building of 
the Terre Haute Brewing Company. Ever since the major 
left school he has been engaged in the banking business. 
He has met with success in his chosen line and is one of 
the best known Terre Hauteans in a half dozen cities. 

Mr. Gagg was born in Indianapolis, but came to Terre 
Haute when he was five years of age. He is ]3astmaster 
of Masonic lodge No. 19, a member of all the Masonic 
bodies, the Elks and the Knights of Pythias. 





FREDERICK C. GOLDSMITH 



' I 'HHRE is no such a tiling as a snap in tlie business 
world. The connnission business is exacting and it 
keejjs Frederick C. Goldsmith busy early and late. 
Before most people are out of bed the grocers are tele- 
lilioning for their vegetable supplies and the commission 
man must be on the alert. 

The \'igo Commission Company was established in 
January, 1900, with I'red C. Goldsmith as ])resident and 
his brother, Arthur F. Goldsmith, secretary and treas- 
urer. Having profited liy an extensive training in the 
same business with tlicir fatlier, tlie Goldsmith lirothers 
have enlarged their vohune of trade and have added an 
ice cream department. This latter deiiartment is no 
small alTair, the plant liting the largest in the state and 
furnishing frigid refresliment for thousands in the swelter- 
ing days of the spring and summer months. Between 
thirty-five and forty persons are given employment in 
the ve.getable, ice cream and cold storage departments. 

Mr. Goldsmitli was born in St. Louis and came to Terre 
Haute with his parents in 1877. He passed through the 
public schools and su]5i)lemented this part of his education 
by taking a business cnllege ciiurse. He is a Knight 
Templar and is also liu active member of tlic Young 
Business Men's Club. 



BRUCE F. FAILEY 



N TEXT to being the ice man, the pleasure of being treas- 
urer of the Terre Haute Brewing Companv would 
not be inconsiderable. But then all of the money 
you see coming through the "pipe line" does not remain 
in the cofifers of the brewing company. Wliile it is Mr. 
Failey's business to take care of this stream of filthy lucre, 
it is also his duty to pay out a great deal of it. The gov- 
ernment gets some of the money from the "pipe line," 
the railroads get their share, hundreds of employes are to be 
paid, new buildings are to be erected, and the minor ex- 
penses of an industry, one of the ten largest of its kind in 
the country, would stagger a smaller concern. 

Mr. Failey, w"ho is holding the sack here, is a native of 
Indiana's capital and was born thirtv-one years ago. He 
came to Terre Haute when he was thirteen vears of age 
and has done very well by remaining liere and paying 
strict attention to business. He is a graduate of the Rose 
Polytechnic Institute, having been a student in the elec- 
trical engineering course. Mr. Failey accepted his first 
position after leaving the institute with the Blair & Failey 
Company, being treasurer of that C(im])anv for three 
years. He then became treasurer of the Terre Haute 
Brewing Company. As one of the younger business men 
of the town, Mr. Failey is well known. He is a director 
in the Terre Haute National Bank, the United States 
Trust Coitipany and is interested in a number of different 
enterprises. 

Mr. Failey enjoys automobiling. hunting and fishing. 
He is a member of the Terre Haute Gun Clul) and several 
other organizations. 





PAUL N. BOGART 



ly^R. BOGART is one of our youngest members of the 
■'•"■*• bar. On page 726, section 13 of tlie heavy Morocco 
bound volume which he holds in his hands, is just 
the point he has been looking for. He has found exactly 
the right authority that's needed to win his case, and he 
will soon be ready to tell the jury all about it. He has a 
faculty of being pretty sure of his grounds before going 
ahead. Law books do not furnisli all of Mr. Bogart's 
reading. He enjoys literature of another kind occa.sionally 
and frequently looks up authorities other than law, when 
"down" for a paper before the Literary Club. 

Mr. Bogart resided in Clinton until he was big enougli 
to attend college. He was born and reared in Vermillion 
county. He went through the pubHc schools of the mining 
town and later went to Waliash college where he absorbefl 
all that tliere was to learn, up to and including the st)plio- 
more year. Then he finished his literary and scientific 
training at Williams college, in Massachusetts. He was 
graduated from the latter school in 1899 and entered 
Columbia ITniversily, New York City, getting the law 
degree in 1902. For a time Mr. Bogart was in the offices 
of Baker & Daniels at Indianapolis. He decided, however, 
to locate in Terre Haute and came here shortly afterwards, 
forming a partnerslup with Judge Joshua Jump. Mr. 
Bogart is deputy prosecutor and looks after most of tlic 
cases in [lolice court, and also assists in trying cases in tlic 
upper court. He knows llie whole gamut of mirtli and 
misery in the police court room. 

Mr. Bogart has every promise of a successful le.gal career 
and is well equipped for his profession. He is a member 
of Paul Revere lodge of the Knights of Pythias and the 
Young Business Men's Cluli, and in Wabash college was 
identified with the Beta Tlieta Pi fraternity. 



WILLIAM SEYMOUR RONEY 



MR. RONEY has been for over thirty years connected 
in an official capacity with the Terre Haute and 
IndianapoUs Railroad Company, the "Vandalia 
Line," at Terre Haute, being for twenty-seven years 
auditor of the company, which position he now holds. 

He was born in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, the seat of Dick- 
inson college, and also of the noted Indian School. His 
mother moved later to Philadelphia, where she died at an 
advanced age. His father passed away many years before. 
Mr. Roney was graduated from the city schools and was 
prepared for college, when the death of an older brother 
of similar physique alarmed his mother who decided to 
to have him enter business life. He accordingly began 
his railroad hfe in the general offices of the Cumberland 
Valley Railroad at Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, as clerk 
in the general passenger olTice. After about ten years 
service he, by the advice of Mr. D. W. Minshall, who was 
always a valued friend, removed to Terre Haute and took 
service with the Terre Haute and Indianapolis Railroad 
Company, where he lias remained until the present time. 

Mr. Roney has always lieen closely identified with the 
l)usiness, church and charitable work of the city. He has 
been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church from 
boyhood, and is especially active in connection with Cen- 
tenary church as steward, trustee, president of the official 
board, superintendent of the Sunday school from eight to 
ten years, and member of the quartette choir. He has 
also been actively identified with the charitable work of 
the city, being at present vice president of the Union 
Hospital board of directors. He has been connected with 
the work of the Yoimg Men's Christian Association as 
president in 1900, and is now a member of the advisory 
board of the state work. He is a member of a number of 
the social orders of the city, being past master of Terre 
Haute lodge No. 19 of the Masons, and also a member of 
the Royal Arch Masons and past eminent commander and 
prelate of Terre Haute Commandery Knights Templar. 

Mr. Roney is of a happy, cheerful nature and although 
a bachelor seems not to have missed any of the pleasures 
of life that come within the ordinary ken. 

He is fond of music and literary work, and finds a great 
pleasure in his well selected jirivale lilirarv of some five 
or six hundred volumes. 





M. P. AKERS 



TPHE modern business college is easily the university of 
*■ the great class of young men and women who cannot 
afford the means for a four years' course in some of 
the colleges or the technical schools. Here, within a com- 
paratively short time the young man who has graduated 
from the high school may prepare himself for a useful 
place in the commercial world. He can increase his earn- 
ing capacity by becoming ])roficient in a single line and 
the demand for men especially trained is so great that he is 
certain of a position if he possesses any degree of courage 
and self-reliance. Mr. Akers makes it his special business 
to fit young men and women out for the battle of life. 
He has been identified with commercial college work in 
Terre Haute for a number of years and in convinced of the 
truthfulness of the statement in the book which all may 
read. 

Like a majority of the men whose faces apiJear in this 
book, Mr. Akers was born on a farm. Fie is a native of 
\'igo county and received the first rudiments of an educa- 
tion in the country schools. At sixteen years of age he 
removed to Osage county, Kansas. He attended Normal 
school in the Sunflower state and taught school for several 
terms. Returning to Terre Haute he became an instructor 
in the Terre Haute Commercial College. He was asso- 
ciated with Mr. W. H. Garvin in commercial college work 
for some time and three years ago became the proprietor 
of the Wabash Business College. Over one hundred grad- 
uates from the Wabash are now holding excellent positions 
in Terre Haute, and Mr. Akers has more places offered 
than he can fill, so great is the demand for competent 
stenographers and bookkeepers. The Waliasli is an insti- 
tution of which Terre Haute is proud. 

Mr. Akers is a member of tlie Knights of Pythias, the 
Jackson Club and the Connnercial Club. When he has 
finished a day of teaching, he enjoys the healthful relaxa- 
tion that comes from seeing a snappy game of baseball. 



HERBERT E. MEGINNES 



HERBERT MEGINNES, chief clerk to Master Mechanic 
Mechling of the VandaUa, has paused long enough 
from looking over a report of hot boxes and leakv 
Hues to allow a snapshot to be taken by the artist. In 
the big Vandalia family Mr. Meginnes ranks as one of the 
l)est posted young men in the local railroad world. He is 
not afraid of the cars and it is a part of his business to see 
that the engines and cars are in first-class condition as per 
instructions of his chief, Mr. Mechling. In the wonderful 
system of modern railroading the master mechanic's office 
is a busy place and the men v.iio are to lie found tliere 
know pretty well what shape the equi])incnt is in that 
makes the \'andalia a popular and safe road for its patrons. 
.Mr. Meginnes directs the work of a number of assistants 
and has thoroughly familiarized himself with this branch 
of railroad work. 

He was born in the city of Washington, D. C, May 30, 
186*}, and later moved to Willianispurt, Pennsylvania. 
He came from W'illiamsport to Indianapolis in 1885 and 
accepted his first position in the motive power de])artment 
of tlie Pennsy system. He was employed in the same 
department at Columbus, Ohio, and Logansport, Indiana, 
liefore coming to Terre Haute in April, 1897. Mr. Megin- 
nes began his work in the master mechanic's office here, 
filling a position of much importance and responsibility. 
Besides helping to move the wheels of commerce safely 
and speedily, Mr. Meginnes is interested in other enter- 
prises, being secretary and a director of the Kettle Creek 
Coal Company. 

He is a lover of all healthful outdoor sports and would 
easily recognize a good hunting or fishing S])ot along the 
right-of-way of the Vandalia. Mr. Meginnes is a member 
of the Masons, lodge No. 86, clerk of Terre Haute Camp 
No. 8.'i of the Woodmen of the World, and lielongs to Post 
G of the Travelers Protective As.sociation. 





FRED W. BEAL 



THE boy from the farm has cut no little ice in Terre 
Haute. It is plain that a majority of Terre Haute's 
business and professional men received their train- 
ing out in tlie sunlitjlit and lietween the furrows, Mr. 
Beal, whom we present liere as one of llie town's best 
known younger lawyers, was born on a farm in Parke 
county, near Rockville, and lived on a farm in Vigo county 
for several years. He was graduated from the Terre 
Haute high school in 1889, having the highest percentage 
among the boys in his class in his studies. He attended 
school at the State Normal for four terms and wielded the 
birch for one winter in Otter Creek township. 

Then he began the reading of law, a profession which 
he kept in view from the time he was a small boy. He 
began his studies in the law oflices of Davis, Robinson & 
Reynolds and tlicn went tn .\nn Arbor, where he was 
graduated from tlic law department of the University of 
Michigan in 189.j. He returned to the offices of Davis, 
Revnolds & Davis and was with this firm until he formed 
a partnership with S. C. Davis, whose death occurred in 
1807. In 1898 Mr. Beal was elected prosecuting attorney 
by a majority of 532 votes, which attested somewhat to 
his popularity, as only three democrats were elected that 
year. He was re-elected to the ofiice by the largest ma- 
jority of any man on either ticket. As prosecutor, Mr. 
Beal met with good success, making a record in the con- 
viction of men that had not been equalled for many years. 
In 1933 Mr. Beal was made a deputy at the city court and 
was the prosecutor's assistant in a number of cases in tlie 
upper court. He is engaged now in the general practice 
of law, giving considerable attention to estates of which 
he has been placed in charge. 

Mr. Beal is a member of Fort Harrison lodge No. 157, 
the Knights of Pythias, Masonic lodge No. 86, and Ute 
Tribe of the Red Men. He has no pronounced hobljies 
but ])erhaps enjoys jilaying with his baby daughter more 
than reading dry and prosiac subjects of legal lore. 



GEORGE E. THICKSTUN 



f T was Captain Thickstun on the Ohio river, and now it's 
* Vardmaster Thickstun on the \'andaha railroad. It 
is rather a coincidence that father and son should rep- 
resent two different kinds of transportation. George E. 
Thickstun was born at Jeffersonville, Indiana, where his 
father for years was a captain on several of the best known 
river vessels. For some reason or other young Thickstun's 
mind turned to the steam railway and he has been engaged 
in this business ever since he cpiit the JelTersonville high 
school. 

His first position was held witli the old J. M. & I. as 
bill clerk and ticket a.£;ent and when the road was absorbed 
by the " Pennsy " system he was promoted to a responsible 
place in the trainmaster's office. For a while Mr. Thick- 
stun was assistant to the claim agent of the road in Louis- 
ville and later became night vardmaster at Columbus. It 
was in Columbus that Mr. Thickstun surrendered his heart 
to Miss Anna White, a dau.ghter of Colonel James White, 
who w'as connected with the J. M & 1 , and their marriage 
took place in October, 1894. Colonel White is remembered 
by many of the older railroad men as a typical Kentucky 
gentleman, courtly and dignified, of tine training and 
generous to a fault. Mr, H. I. Miller was division super- 
intendent of the Louisville division and when transferred 
to St. Louis he had Mr. Thickstun accompany him. At 
St. Louis Mr. Thickstun was first assistant yardmaster of 
the \'andalia and was next promoted to the position of 
general yardmaster. In 1896 he was promoted to his 
present position. There are fifty-two miles of track in 
the Terre Haute yards and Mr. Thickstun has over a hun- 
dred men in his employ. It is his duty to handle all 
equipment and freight trains as well as passenger trains in 
the local yard limits, and this is no lazy man's position. 

Mr. Thickstun is a popular member of the Elks, the 
Knights of Pythias and several other lodges. 





MAURICE WALSH 



TN this picture we have a full and unobstructed view of 
the glad hand of Maurice Walsh, together witli the 
appurtenance tliereto belonging, namely, the smile 
that won't come olT. Among the attributes of the hotel 
man must be counted the smile and the glad hand. Both 
aid in getting business and make the weary traveler or 
tlie stranger feel at home just as soon as he enters the 
liostelery. For a good many years, Maurice Walsli lias 
been welcoming the travehng pubHc to Terre Haute with 
this glad hand, and as a consequence his acquaintance 
has been extended over a wide stretch of territory. 

Mr. Walsh was born in the Em|)ire state forty-seven 
years a.go and for some time was located in New York 
City. He has lived in Terre Haute twentv-five vears and 
has been en.ga.gcd in the hotel Inisiness practically all fif 
that time. For a number of years Mr. Walsh was con- 
nected with the Exchan.ge hotel and for the past twelve 
years has been identified witli llie ,St. Nicholas hotel, one 
of the best known hostelries in the cilv. It has been a 
favorite stojjping jjlace for tlie cimimercial men and nut 
a few of the railroad men call the St. Xicholas their home 
when they "lay over." Two years ago Mr. John Cleary 
became a partner with Mr. Walsh in the busiijess, and in 
July of this year Mr. Cleary purchased the entire interests 
of Mr. Walsh. With extensive interests in the coal field 
and otlicr enterprises, Mr. Walsh keeps himself busy. 

He is a lover of traveling and has made several tri]js 
through the west recently. He enjoys driving and is a 
thoroughly sociable and enjoyable companion. He is a 
member of the Young Men's Institute. 



WALTER SCOTT DUENWEG 



/^XE day last winter a salesman in Mr. Duenweg's place 
of business was displaying the merits of one of his 
fine steel ranges. On opening the oven door a 
defenseless little mouse hopped out. 

"Throw something at him!" cried the customer. 

"It won't do any good," rejilied Mr. Duenweg, "he's 
out of my range." And then Mr. Duenwe.g laughed 
heartily and the mouse escaped. Mr. Duenweg is always 
in good humor and this lias a good effect on everybody 
with whom he associates. Besides seUing stoves and 
ranges, Mr. Duenweg sells fine mantles — not all kinds, but 
just the Ijest kinds. He is a great lover of hunting and 
fishing and it is safe to say that his window displays of 
fishing tackle, nets and hunting paraphernalia have had 
much to do with the cultivation of a love for tliese sports. 
The Duenweg hardware store was established twenty 
years ago and is one of the best known in the city. Mr. 
Duenweg is secretary and treasurer of the companv. 

After graduating from tlie high school in 1888, Mr. 
Duenweg went into the business with his father and has 
applied himself closely to learning the "outs and ins" of 
the hardware trade. When lie has time for a vacation 
he usually enjoys an outing at Lake Ahixinkuckee. Mr. 
Duenweg is a member of the Young Business Men's Club, 
the Wal^ash Cycling Club and Paul Revere lodge Knights 
of Pythias. He would almost forego a good meal to see 
the Hottentots play a good game of baseball. 





FREDERICK W. SHALEY 



I !•" yiiu are looking for someone to tell you where the best 
*■ tishing is at Lake Maxinkuckee don't forget that 
Doctor Shaley is about as well informed regarding the 
spots where the bass are likely to congregate in this beau- 
tiful body of water as anybody else. The doctor enjoys 
fishing and he always goes where he is bound to catch 
something. Every spring and fall he hies himself to the 
lake where he angles for bass. He has some good catches 
to his credit and furnislies affidavits with all of his big fish 
stories. 

Doctor Shaley has lived in Terre Haute all of his life, 
liaving been born here September 13, 1858. He has not 
been unlucky, either, just because he happened to be born 
on the thirteenth day of the month. The doctor received 
his education in the common schools and then entered 
Mission House College at Franklin, Wisconsin, where he 
remained three years, later entering Heidelberg University 
and graduating with the degree of A. B. in 1881. He 
studied medicine and surgery at Rush Medical College, 
Chicago, graduating from that institution in 1884. He 
began the practice of his profession here in Terre Haute. 
For sixteen years he has been a member of the stafT at St. 
Anthony's hospital. 

He has served as president of the lioard of health and as 
township doctor, but aside from this he has never held 
any ])ublic offices. Doctor Shaley is a staunch democrat 
and a memlier of the Jackson Club. He is also a member 
of the Vigo Medical Society, the AesculajMan Society and 
the American Medical Association. 

Always athletically incHned, Dr. Shaley is a lover of 
outdoor sports, having figured in college baseball in his 
early days. He is one of the Terre Haute ]ihysicians thai 
are seen at Atldetic Park fre(|ueiitly "rooting" for tlie 
Hottentots. 



WILL E. HENDRICH, JR. 



THE intricate details of the abstract business have not 
spoiled the disposition of Will E. Hendrich, Jr. Al- 
though the business is an exacting one and requires 
close application, there isn't a more sociable person in 
town than the subject of this sketch. Perhaps this is the 
reason why "The Best People on Earth" have made him 
exalted ruler of No. 86. 

New Albany, Indiana, is jimud nf the fact that Will 
Hendrich, Jr., first saw daylight there. This was in .May, 
1871. After a residence in New Albany of seventeen 
years Mr. Hendrich came to Terre Haute. He attended 
tlie local high scliool and received a di])loma from Mr. 
Wiley. He then went straight into the abstract business 
where he has been ever since. This makes Mr. Hendrich 
one of the oldest abstract men in town in point of con- 
tinuous service. He is now a member of the firm of the 
Hendrich Abstract Company, the company having been 
organized by an uncle, William Hendrich, in 1868. As 
vice-president and treasurer of the firm, Mr. Hendrich has 
a system of working up abstracts of title that is a model. 
Every inch of ground in \'igo county is covered so thor- 
oughly that its entire history may l)e laid bare in a re- 
markably short time. 

So far as is known, Mr. Hendrich has made but one 
"try" at politics, and that was when he was a candidate 
for a place on the school board. He is not at all dis- 
couraged over the result of his candidacy and is the same 
stalwart republican that he has been all of his life. 

Mr. Hendrich is a lover of hunting and fishing, and was 
once guilty of taking part in an amateur theatrical in 
which a Japanese wedding was reproduced. This little 
play was indirectly responsible for Mr. Hendrich's mar- 
riage to one of the members of the cast. An intimate 
friend of the amateur actor also met his fate in the same 
company, later marrying one of the little Japanese girls. 

Mr. Hendrich is past master of Euclid lodge, F. and A. 
M., and was recently honored by his brother Elks in his 
election to the office of exalted ruler. 





EDWARD P. FAIRBANKS 



TVrE have a good i)icture here of Kdward P. Fairbanks 
the general manager of the Terre Haute Brewing 
Company. To look at Mr. Fairbanks you would 
hardly imagine that his first love in the liusiness world 
was railroading. He ajipears entirely too mild-mannered 
a man to be guilty of smashing trunks. But he did so at 
one time. This was at Greencastle when he became the 
agent there of the old Louisville and New Albany railroad. 
Mr. Fairbanks soon i|uit assisting the local passenger 
brakeman in the loading of trunks into the ba.ggage car 
and went up higher. Five years of his life he spent as 
traveling freight agent for the Chica.go & Eastern Illinois 
railroad and then he became general freight agent for the 
old Illinois Midland road, now the Peoria division of the 
\'andalia. 

When Mr. Fairbanks quit the railroad business he lie- 
came identified with the Terre Haute Distilling Company. 
In 1890 he became manager of the Terre Haute Brewing 
Company, a position that occupies practically all of his 
time, and one which has grown with the development of 
the local plant. The product of the company is adding 
fame to Terre Haute and can be found from coast to coast. 
Agencies are maintained as far east as Pittsburg and New 
Castle, and Champagne Velvet can be quaffed in the cafes 
of Seattle, Washington. Sixty agencies and wholesale 
estabhshments are located in as many different cities and 
the product is retailed by several thousand dealers in a 
half dozen states. 

Mr. Fairbanks was born and reared in Terre Haute and 
received a common school education. If he has a single 
hobby it is in seeing the local brewing plant become yet 
larger and its product more famous. 



WILLIAM W. KAUFMAN 



T OOKING at the placid and genial countenance of Mr. 
'—' Kaufman you would hardly suspect that he had 
iust emerged from a mayoralty campaign. "And 
Kaufman also ran" — this was the way the defeated can- 
didate put it the next morning when he was seen at his 
grocery store measuring a ])eck of apples for a customer. 
"Feeling sorei" Oh, no; not a bit, I guess the people 
didn't want me for a candidate, just as luqijiy as ever." 
So we see that Mr. Kaufman is not worrying about his 
defeat a little bit. He enjoys being busy and if he did 
work overtime during the compaign he does not regret it. 

The most genial grocer in Terre Haute was born here 
in 1861 on the thirteenth day of January. Contrary to 
all expectations the Kaufman baby did not seem to be an 
unlucky one, but waxed fat and stnmg. When Mr. 
Kaufman completed his studies in the graded schools he 
mounted the seat of a grocery deHvery wagon for Wright 
& Kaufman and began learning the business. He was in 
this grocery for several years and worked for his brother, 
P. J. Kaufman, before he went into business for himself. 
His first venture was in the commission business in Chi- 
cago. He returned to Terre Haute after his partner had 
disappeared with seven carloads of cabbages, potatoes, 
tomatoes and other green truck. Mr. Kaufman did not 
lose faith in mankind but when he established his grocery 
store six years ago, he started alone. 

Mr. Kaufman is republican councilman at large at the 
present time and has made a very good representative of 
the people. He is deservedly popular and is never idle. 
He is a member of the Elks lodge and the Uniform Rank 
Company No. 83, Knights of Pythias. He is a Mason 
and past worthy president of the local Aerie of Eagles. 
Mr. Kaufman is a lover of hcaldiful nnldoor sports. 





HARRY A. MOTTIER 



C'RIE, Pennsylvania, was made famous through the 
■*— ' combined efforts of Harry A. Mottier and Commodore 
Perry. The latter merely fitted out his ships here 
for that famous sortie against the English, but the subject 
in (|uestion laid his keel, trimmed his sails and luffed his 
spanker jib right here in Erie. Mr. Mottier often remarks 
that if Perry had only hesitated until he arrived, the rout 
might have been more complete. Perry's achievement 
occurred in ISKv Mr. Mottier's first business with Erie 
was August 16, 1868. He early concluded, however, 
tliat Erie was not the ]>lacc for liim. Erie has too 
nuicli lake. The nervous and ])cstiferous fashion of 
all these wet acres in leaving tlieir beds without cfinsidera- 
tion for results, decided Harry that they wouldn't do to 
raise hay on. So convinced, Mr. Mottier treked westward 
to grow up with the country. Thus began his career of 
travel which eventually reached a climax in Mottier's 
joining the Travelers' Protective Association. He has 
also had some doings with the Masonic goat. 

The little sally about the slippery acres of the lake and 
the hay has possibly given the reader an intimation as to 
Mr. Mottier's principal interest in life. So far, so good. 
Wholesaleing hay is his favorite pastime. Motti or Mottae, 
the first syllable of his name being Cycldaic for hay, 
naturally left Harry A. no other course to pursue. Like 
Lago d'Iseo of old, Mr. Mottier has much faith in hay and 
it was at his own suggestion that the Civic I-eague adopted 
the timothy blossom as the national flower. Mr. Mottier 
modestly admits that he is the originator of the .social 
diversion of the "hay ride." He can arrange to ride a bale 
of hay from Podunk, Iowa, to Liverpool or Brest without 
the least inconvenience. For a diversion from the stren- 
uous hours of business, Mr. Mottier has developed the flat 
habit and recently the rearing of a handsome apartment 
house on the north side has been credited to him. If you 
cannot raise hay on the flats of Illinois, you can raise flats 
on the corner lots of Tcrre Haute, so Mr. Mottier catches 
'em a-comin' and a-goin'. 



WILLIAM S. DOAK 



IT was a noted southern evangelist ulio u|)l)rai(led several 
*■ members of his congregation for their imbelief in a 
burning hereafter. He advised several of the unbe- 
lievers that when tliev died it might be best for them to 
take a linen duster along with them, anyway. Touching 
upon the communication received by Mr. Doak from the 
lower regions, it strikes the average person that a suit of 
asbestos would be preferable to a linen duster. For an 
indestructible outlit of wearing apparel, asbestos in the 
common vernacular has every other kind of goods "beaten 
a country block." 

Mr. Doak came to Terre Haute in 189o, after having had 
a splendid business experience, being associated with his 
father, Mr. A. J. Doak, in the mercantile and wool busi- 
ness for several years. He purchased an interest in the 
Riddle-Hamilton Company, one of the oldest and best 
known real estate and insurance firms in the city and is 
the general manager of the company. Mr. Doak has as- 
sisted in Terre Haute's material prosperity by encouraging 
the home-getting habit. He is secretary of the Lincoln 
Land Company and a stockholder and director in the 
K.rumbhaar Land Company. In both of these additions 
numerous cozy homes have been liuilt. As president of 
the American Asbestos Company, Mr. Doak is interested 
in seeing this material come into still more general use. 
The mines of the company are located in Virginia and the 
asbestos taken out is of a very tine fibrous character. In 
Mexico, the sister republic on the south, Mr. Doak is inter- 
ested in banking and other enterprises. He is a stock- 
holder in the Mexico City Banking Comjiany and makes 
trips frequently to that coimtry. 

Mr, Doak is a Knight Templar and a member of the 
Elks lodge No. 86. He enjoys traveling and fortunately 
can combine business with pleasure in making trips east 
or west, which generally last four or five weeks. 

Mr. Doak was born in the Buckeye state, in the town of 
Bedford, Coshocton county. His boyhood days were spent 
in the state that has almost outrivalled Virginia in pro- 
ducing presidents. 





ALBERT G. NICHOSON 



IF you should ask Mr. Nichoson the best route for shippers 
* to the east he would immediately reply that the Cen- 
tral States Despatch Line is superior to all others. 
Mr. Nichoson is the representative of this particular line 
in the territory between Indianapolis and St. Louis. He 
keeps pretty busy all of the time and is aiding Baltimore 
to maintain her supremecy over Philadelphia as the export 
mart for western manufacturers and sliippers. 

Mr. Nichoson has never made any brag about it, but his 
ancestors were niunbered among the best people of 
England. A great grandfather was an officer in the 
English army and met his death fighting the revolution- 
ists near Boston. Two sons were left by the English 
officer and they afterwards settled in the east, one in Can- 
ada and the other in New York state. Mr. Nichoson was 
born in Orleans, New York. He attended Albion College 
before beginning his business career. His first position 
was with the American Express Company at Rochester, 
New York. I-'rom Rncliester lie was transferred to New 
York City wliere he remained fourteen years. He was 
5U|jerintendent for the American a number of years, hav- 
ing charge of the New York Central lines between Buffalo 
and New York. He spent twelve years as the agent of 
the company at Rochester. It was in 1881 that Mr. 
Nichoson came to Terre Haute. At first he represented 
the White Line Fast Freight, and then became the district 
agent for the Central States Dispatch which is operated 
by the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad. Though seeing many 
years of active work, Mr. Nichoson is just as lively as ever 
today and covers a great deal of outside terrtiory in ad- 
dition to taking care of the business in Terre Haute. 

.Mr. Xiclioson is a member of the Masonic fraternity of 
Xcu Yiirk state. He has no pronounced hobbies and 
finds perhaps more pleasure in getting business for his 
road than in doing anything else. 



MILTON E. HERZ 



An Indiana author this, whose writings you have read; 
He never makes up liction, but gives the facts instead. 
His works are all in season, they're never out of date. 
For timeliness he's noted, so that all he writes is "late." 

1\ /IR. HERZ and his lead pencil are inseparable com- 
•^ ■^ ])anison. He is Hke a trained reporter, and why? 
This is the reason. He represents the publicity 
department of the Herz Bazaar, the biggest specialty store 
in this section of the country. There are many things in 
this big store and new articles arriving daily. It is an 
indisputable fact that women buy more than men, and 
they are readers of the present day store news. Now, in 
order that the friends of the big store may know just what 
is the latest in coats, cloaks, wraps, hosiery, rugs, laces, 
and a thousand and one utlier tilings, it is necessary to 
notify them through the press. Mr. Herz takes care of 
this important duty in good style. 

For years and years the women in Terre Haute have 
been reading the Herz Bulletin in the daily papers. Here 
they find their bargains and know also that nothing but 
facts and truths are recited. As a chronicler of store 
happenings, Mr. Herz has established a reputation for 
clearness of style that is the envy of more than one adver- 
tising writer. Without the use of "gigantic," "stupend- 
ous," "overwhelming" and "terrific" Mr. Herz writes 
the kind of store news that brings out the buyers. 

In addition to writing the advertisements Mr. Herz is 
the buyer for several departments of the big store. He 
has been in the Herz establishment ever since he grad- 
uated from the high school in 1893. Mr. Herz is a mem- 
ber of the Young Business Men's Club and the Commercial 
Club. 





'Mm 




FRANK M. RYAN 



IN this little sketch we get a good view of a jolly under- 
taker — a man whose life necessarily is surrounded by 
other people's sadness, yet who manages to keep in 
good humor. Perhaps this is the result of the knowledge 
that his Hfe is not a fractional ])art as sad as it might be. 
But why philoso])hize' 

When we think nf the burial (if tlic dead most of us 
associate it with tlie Ryan name. Tliis is because tlie 
Ryans, father and sons, have been engaged in the luider- 
taking business in Terre Haute for ;i great manv vears. 
P. J. Ryan, who established the l)iisiness. has entrusted 
the greater part of the undertaking to liis son, Frank, who 
became a partner with him in 1902. Charles Rvan became 
a member of the firm in IVO.v Tlie livery and boarding 
stables which are conducted on .Soulli Sixth street are as 
complete as any in the city and the equijjment for funerals 
is the finest in the city. Mr. Ryan has given every atten- 
tion to his business and. as a consefpience,' becoming dig- 
nity in the conduct of tlic undertaking branch marks the 
Ryan establisliment as of the liest. 

Mr. Ryan is a native of Terre Haute and attended the 
higli school and Connnercial Colle.ge before entering his 
present work. The social side of liis nature is well devel- 
ojjcd and his genialty lias counted for nuich in liuilding u]i 
the |)resent business whicli is associated \vith the Rvan 
name. Mr. Ryan is a meml)er of sexeral organizations, 
among them the Elks, No. S6, the Foresters, the Red Men. 
the Young Business Men's Club, llie \'(iung Men's Institute 
and the Kniglils iif C.)huiibus. 



SAMUEL CRAWFORD M'KEEN 



IV/IR. M'KEEK is a banker. He can add long rows of 

figures, count money rapidly and caloulalc interests 

and discounts. But tliis is not all. He can take 

care of other people's money. We see liim holding down 

a half dozen jobs of this kind in the picture. 

Mr. McKeen was born in Terre Haute forty-three years 
ago on the seventh day of December. After graduating 
from the high school he be.gan his banking career, entering 
the McKeen liank as a messenger. He served an ajipren- 
dceship as collector and then went behind the counter of 
an institution that has been identified with llic financial 
and business interests of the city for fifty years and more. 
Mr. McKeen became a receiving teller and is now a partner 
in the firm witli his brother, Frank McKeen. Perhaps no 
other bank in the state is better known, its founder, Mr. 
W. R. McKeen, having estalihshed it in bS.S.^, and building 
for himself a wide reputation as a conservative and success- 
ful financier. 

Besides being interested in banking, Mr. McKeen is 
identified with several other enterprises, among them the 
\\';iliash Building and Loan Association. Ilie Inion Savings 
and Loan Association and the I'licenix Building, Loan and 
Savings Association. He is treasurer of the last three 
named associations. 

Mr. McKeen is a lover of the country and enjoys hunting 
and fishing. He has shown his interest in the game of 
baseball by acting as treasurer of the local baseball asso- 
ciation for several years. 






KEI'OBtlCflN Ortff/lr 
W/\H/\SH 6. & I ASS 
THE fOUMTRH f til 
T. H.B/1.SE 6/M.L /IS 
'^^"' /I FfWoriiff 





WILLIAM J. FREEMAN 



4«"\Y7HAT'S in a name?" With a banker it is every- 
^ tiling. By the sign, the banker knows his cus- 
tomers. Mr. Freeman, who we present here, is 
closely identified with the business interests of Jasonville, 
nevertheless he is a Terre Hautean. He is cashier of the 
First National bank at Jasonville and is also secretary of 
the Blackhawk Coal Company. The coal which we see 
him carrying is converted into money by good business 
management and is used again to develop the rich re- 
sources of this most favored part of the country, of which 
Terre Haute is the center. Mr. Freeman is as well known 
in Terre Haute as Jasonville and is helping to keep up a 
family name that is synonomous with husthng. 

Mr. Freeman was born in the town of Washington, 
Daviess county, in 1869, but moved from that place to 
Vincennes when he was five years of age. He attended 
the University of Vincennes and accepted his first position 
with his father. Job Freeman, who had been elected auditor 
of Knox county. When Mr. Freeman's term of olTice 
expired the son accepted a position as assistant cashier 
in the Second National bank of Vincennes. Mr. Freeman 
was in this position seven years, becoming cashier and 
holding the latter position three years. In 1893 Mr. Free- 
man accompanied his father to Pinton to enter the coal 
business, the firm opening the Green Valley mines. The 
First National bank of Jasonville was estabhshed by the 
Freemans in the same year, Mr. Freeman, Sr., being presi- 
dent and the subject of this sketch, cashier. In addition 
to being secretary of the Blackhawk Company, Mr. Free- 
man is also at the head of the Jasonville Mercantile Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Freeman is an I{lk, a Knight Templar and a very 
good fellow to know. He enjoys a good game of billiards 
as well as any man in town. 



WILLIAM WOOD PARSONS 



MR. PARSONS is not trying to run away with the 
Normal. He wants it to remain right where it is 
and continue to grow in usefulness. We would pot 
have you infer that President Parsons is the Normal 
school, but it is undeniably true that the head of any in- 
stitution has much to do with its success and prestige. 
Terre Haute is proud of the Normal school and proud of 
the men and women who have made it what it is today 
in the educational world. 

The third president of Indiana's State Normal school 
was born in Terre Haute in a humble frame dwelling on 
South Seventh street. This dwelling was in an addition 
that had been laid out and owned by Dr. Thomas Parsons, 
the president's father. The young man had just fairly 
started to grow when his parents moved to a farm near 
Areola, Illinois. Mr. Parsons attended the country schools 
and put in some pretty hard licks at manual labor before 
he started for Terre Haute and entered the State Normal. 
He was graduated in the first class in 1872. Prof. Howard 
Sandison, now vice-president of the Normal, was in the 
same class, there being seven members in all. Mr. Parsons 
held his first position as principal of the Gosport schools, 
then he was principal of a ward building at Indianapolis, 
and later had the department of mathematics at Short - 
ridge high school. He remained in the latter position 
until he came to Terre Haute in 1878, as assistant in the 
department of English at the Normal school. He after- 
wards took charge of the history department and served 
as vice-president of the school four years. He was then 
elected president. He has filled his present res])onsible 
office for twenty-three years. 

President Parsons is known for exactness. Things must 
move on time, and his especial hobby is seeing that the 
financial reports of the school are always up-to-date and 
correct to the penny. AVhen Mr. Parsons became presi- 
dent of the school the attendance was 700. Now the 
attendance reaches 1,700. No other like institution ranks 
higher. The school has been greatly liberalized under 
Mr. Parson's administration and its efficiency has always 
been well maintained. 





DANIEL FASIG 



T TAVE you heard of Fasigville? It's the prettiest part 
*■ '■ of Terre Haute. In order that we may associate 
Fasigville firmly in your mind we herewitli present 
the mayor of Fasigville, the man who owns tlie town, and 
has made it a verital^le garden. This is nnc real jollv 
landlord, one that makes you feel at home and sees that 
you are provided with all the comforts within reason. 

Daniel Fasig has hut one blot on his career. He was 
liorn in Illinois. This, however, lie could not hel]). He 
came to light in Clarke county on a farm and lived in 
Martinsville until he was ten years of age, when he accom- 
panied his mother to Terre Haute. He attended St. 
Joseph's school and then started to work in the Ellis woolen 
mill. After being in several positions he settled down to 
learn the harness maker's trade with Miller & Schewbel. 
He stitched collars and tugs until 187.i when lie formed a 
partnership with Oscar Froeb. He retired from this busi- 
ness in 1876 and became a lieutenant of police and the 
same year made his first entrance into politics, running 
for town marshal, but suffered defeat. He resigned his 
position on the police force to accept a place in the Froeb 
Hardware store. For thirteen years he was in the retail 
liquor business and in 1892 went into the commission 
Inisiness, retiring to become a candidate for the nomination 
for sheriff on the democratic ticket. Mr. Fasig served in 
the sheriff's office two terms, giving up his liadge of author- 
ity in January of the present year. At present he is .giving 
his attention to his property interest on Xortli Fourth 
street. 

Mr. Fasig organized Coni])any Xo. 8.1, I'niform Rank 
Knights of Pythias, and was captain of tlie company a 
number of years, commanding the company in several 
notable prize competitions. He is also a Mason, a Knight 
Templar, an Odd Fellow and belongs to at least a dozen 
other fraternal and secret societies. Mr. Fasig was one 
of the most po]Hilar olTicials that ever held office in Vigo 
count V. 



WILLIAM E. EPPERT 



MR. EPPERT is figurint; up the aiiK.imt nf supplies 
needed for the four bit; stores openited by the Coal 
Bluff Mining Company. With nine producing 
mines, hundreds of men are employed and they are all 
patrons of the stores located at the four different towns. 
They "get out" about six thousand tons of coal daily, and 
naturally their appetites are of tlie liest. It lakes tons of 
flour, meat, coffee, sugar and canned goods to feed this 
army of workers who contribute so much material ])ros- 
perity to this section of the country. 

Mr. Eppert has been identified with the mining Imsiness 
practically all of his life. After he graduated from the 
Terre Haute Commercial College he taught sclii>ol for one 
year and then became manager of the store at Carl)on for 
the Coal Bluff Mining Com]5any. He made sucli a s])lendid 
showing that he became a director and secretary of the 
company, and was then given charge of all the stores. The 
suppHes needed average about $20,000 monthly, so that 
the merchandise business is not a mere side issue after all. 
Mr. Eppert represents one of the largest independent com- 
panies in the coal business in the state, Mr. J. Smith Talley 
being at the head, and is one of the best known o]ierators 
ill this part of the country. In addition to lieing vice- 
president now of the Coal BlulT Company, Mr. Eppert is 
president of the Home Furnishing Company on Wabash 
avenue. Under Mr. Eppert's direction the store has seen 
a steady increase in trade. 

Mr. Eppert was born in Cloverland, Clay co\uity, liut 
has made his home practically all of his life in \'igo terri- 
tory. He has been identified with Terre Haute's business 
interests for a number of years and is a well known church 
man. For several years he has been treasurer of Centenary 
Methodist Episcopal church board and for five years was 
superintendent of the large Sunday school. 

Mr. Eppert is not averse to seeing people enjoy tliem- 
selves and is an admirer of the great national game. He 
frequently goes to Athletic park and joins the rooters in 
encouraging the liome team. 





ERNEST G. ALDEN 



IF tliere is a single institution to which Terre Haute can 
point with pride it is the Rose (Jrphan Home. It 
stands today without an equal in the country and a 
model of its kind in the care of the little ones left fatherless 
and motherless. The naine of Alden has been inseparably 
linked with the Rose Orphan Home, first because the late 
Lvman P. Alden conducted the home from the day it 
received its first inmates; and, second, because he was 
without an equal in institutional work of this stature. 

The board of managers knew of no more worthy suc- 
cessor than the son, Ernest G. Alden, who fills the 
position of superintendent and manager of the home at 
the present time. 

Mr. Alden was born at Quincy, Micliigan, June 21, 1869, 
and lived in Coldwater and Toledo before coming to Terre 
Haute. He was graduated from the high school in the 
class of 1889. Two and one-half years were spent in Den- 
ver upon his graduation. There he held a responsible 
position with a Denver abstract and investment firm. 
Returning to Terre Haute, Mr. Alden traveled for two 
years for a local firm and was credit man for one year at 
the Hulman wholesale grocery house. Failing health 
caused him to seek another line of business and he pur- 
chased an interest in the Terre Haute Pressed Brick Com- 
l)any. He was manager of this company' seven years. 
Next he became purchasing agent for the Terre Haute 
Electric Company, resigning to accept tlie superintend- 
ency of the Rose Orphan Home. 

From eighty to one hundred children are found at this 
model home and they are exceedingly well cared for, the 
methods of Mr. Alden, Sr., being carried out, still adding 
to the reputation of the liiinic, Mr. .Mtlcn enjoys his work 
and realizes the wcmdcrful possibiliiics that lie in everv 
child. 

When taking his vacation Mr. Alden seeks the water, 
as he is a great lover of sailing. 



WALKER SCHELL 



11 ERE is one of Terre Halite's well known physicians 
who affords a surprise occasionally to his fellow 
members of the Literar\' Clult. We see him here 
reading a paper on Ibsen. Xol a nieiiii)er of tlie club was 
sure about Dr. Schell's attitude towards tlie reformer until 
they heard him read his paper on the great novelist and 
playwright. Ibsen never had a better defender than the 
genial doctor. He even found some good ])oints about 
Hedda Gabbler and a few other Ibsen jiroductions that 
have met with severe criticism. He is easily one of the 
unique members of the club and his ])a|)ers are noted for 
their original treatment of the subject under discussion. 
Dr. Schell also knows a good deal about art and architec- 
ture and takes a keen interest in matters of this kind. 

The doctor is a Hoosier by birth, having l)een reared 
at Spencer. He attended the Indiana Medical College at 
Indianapolis and has supplemented his medical knowledge 
since that time by several years study in the leading med- 
ical universities of Germany. For the past fifteen years 
he has practiced in Terre Haute. Dr. Schell is a member 
of the statT of St. Anthony's hos])ital and is jirominently 
identified with all of the medical societies. 

Dr. Schell was one of the first autoists of Terre Haute 
and was one of the first physicians to use the machine in 
his round of professional calls. He has always taken an 
interest in art, due to his knowledge of the masters acquired 
while a student in Euro])e. 





HARRY W. BEGGS 



IV yiR. BEGf'rS, «luim we see in such an exalted position, 
•^ '•'■ is one of the accomodating proprietors of the Terre 
Haute house. He represents a hostelry that has 
added fame to Terre Haute, and one that has entertained 
some notable and distinguished men and women. It is 
not often that a hotel is so closely associated with a city 
and its history, but the Terre Haute House has been a 
fixed institution for a good many years. It was not always 
as it appears now, but it stands on the site of the old Terre 
Haute House of the past. As early as 185.5 the local papers 
in noting the improvements then going on, referred with 
considerable pride to tlie addition that was being built to 
the Terre Haute House. In the same paper it was pointed 
out tliat Terre Haute was growing rapidly and already 
had a population uf 10,000 people. 

Modern demands have brought the hotel to a place 
where it is almost a small city within itself, so complete it 
is in all arrangements and conveniences. Messrs. Watson 
and Beggs cater especially to tlie traveling public and have 
po])ularized the Terre Haute House to a remarkable degree, 
bringing the service up to a standard that is hard to excel. 

Mr. Beggs is Hoosier born, his home formerly being at 
Laurel and vShelbyville. \\'hen he came to Terre Haute 
in 1887 he was first associated with the Wabash Lumber 
Company, and next was a buyer for the Majestic Distillery. 
Four years ago Mr. Beggs became a partner with Mr. R. 
G. Watson in the management of the Terre Haute House. 
Recently he Ijought an interest in the Vincennes Distillery 
and is president of the company there. He has various 
other interests that demand his time and attention. 

During his vacaticm periods Mr. Beggs enjoys hunting 
and fishing. He is a dog fancier and is the owner of sev- 
eral Beagle hounds. He is a popular member of the Elks 
lodge No. 86, and is identified with several other organiza- 
tions. 



EDWARD D. O'BRIEN 



/^NE can hardly imagine how a man who is said to have 
^^^ wheels and other buggy material, could be a com- 
panionable fellow to have about. If you will notice 
Mr. O'Brien has a very genial, open countenance, and you 
wouldn't suspect that he was a descendant of a son of 
Rrin, either, if it wasn't for his name. Mr. O'Brien has 
lots of wheels and his buggy material does not need insect 
powder. 

One cold winter day forty-six years ago Mr. O'Brien 
was a New Year's gift to his parents. He was given a 
hearty greeting and made as comfortable as possible. He 
thri\-ed well and grew- up blessed w'ith a rugged constitu- 
tion. When he had received a common school education 
he started to learn the trade of carriage maker. He was 
given his first "sand papering" job in the shop of Cantrell, 
Jackson & Harrison. Another young man, Martin K. 
O'Connell, a chum of Mr. O'Brien's, began to learn the 
trade at the same time in the same shop. They stuck 
together like brothers. Both were employed for four years 
in the Herman Carriage factory and then they decided to 
go into carriage building for themselves. They began 
business in 1892 in the old shop at .321 Cherry street where 
they learned the rudiments of their trade. They have 
succeeded so well that only recently they completed a 
two-story Ijirck building on the opposite side of Cherry 
street from the old building, in order that their facilities 
might be much improved. Carriages of the most modern 
kind, coupes and delivery wagons are made to order by 
the firm and they cater to a high class trade. 

Mr. O'Brien belongs to several lodges, among them the 
Elks, the Uniform Rank Company No. 3, the Modern 
Woodmen and the Knights of Columbus. 




CHARLES I. FLEMING 




|\ yiR. FLEMIXG tills an inii)ortant ijosition in the public 
■^'■'- life of Terre Haute. He is the sanitary inspector, 
or in other words the man who sees that the milk 
dealer uses no water and no formaldehyde in the product 
he sells. If the meat dealer is found guilty of seUing dis- 
eased meat, then Mr. Fleming brings him to account. 
We have a good picture of ]\Ir. Fleming here looking very 
searchingly upon a piece of beef that has been lirought to 
him for inspection 

We might add that Mr. F^leming is a ]3retty good judge 
of horse flesh, too. Not that horse ifesh is an article of 
diet here, but because he has been engaged in the breeding 
of fast steppers with his father, Samuel J. Fleming, for a 
number of years. The Fleming stables and farm have 
aided not a little to the establishment of Terre Haute's 
reputation abroad as a center for good trotters. iMr. 
Fleming was born at Effingham, Illinois, in 1873, and 
came to Terre Haute when he w'as eleven years of age. 
After completing his course in the public schools he at 
tended the Chicago Veterinary College. Since then he has 
given almost his entire attention to the breeding and sale 
of blooded horses. At the Fleming farm southeast of the 
city can be found the ]\Iargrave colts, the sire of whom is 
owned by the Flemings. In the words of Mr. Fleming, 
"the Margarve colts are fine lookeis and speeders." Mr. 
Fleming is interested in the combination breeders' sales, 
which are held three times a year at Indianapolis and for 
some time was the secretary of the Indianapolis company. 
He is one of the best posted horsemen in the country and 
is a walking encyclopedia of horse information. He was 
one of the first breeders in this part of tlie country to visit 
Europe and sell fine liorses. 

The ins])cclor is past exalted ruler of the Itlks lodge No. 
86, and is also a member of Ivuclid Masonic lodge and of 
the Young Business Men's Clul). 



PETER M. FOLEY 



T TERE we see Mr. Foley in a characteristic attitude, 
characteristic, because Mr. Foley always carries a 
cane and invariably hangs it over liis arm when he 
gets warmed up to his subject. Mr. Foley would not look 
natural without the cane, and it might be added that he 
wears the cane becomingly. 

Mr. Foley is a product of Jennings county and came to 
Terre Haute when he was cjuite voung. .After cumjjleling 
his work in the public schools he turned his attention to 
the subject of law, receiving a part of his legal education 
at the Georgetown College of Law, Washington, P. C, 
while he was occupying a position in one of tlie govern- 
ment departments. Returning to Terre Haute Mr. Foley 
was associated with a lirother in practice for several years. 
Mr. Foley is an old-fashioned democrat and has always 
taken an active interest in politics. He has been city 
attorney several terms and during the Steeg administra- 
tion gave his attention to some very complicated and 
stubborn litigation in which the city was involved. He 
served as county chairman of liis party during one cam- 
paign and filled the position with credit to himself and 
party. Mr. S. D. Royse became a partner with Mr. Foley 
in 190,1. 

Mr. Foley has given considerable of his time to civil law 
and has had a successful career. He is a thoroughly com- 
panionable man with a warm right hand that always 
shakes yours as though he means it. Mr. Foley is known 
to have had Init one fad that was ever veni' noticeable, 
and that is automobiling. 





FINLEY A. M'NUTT 



I TERE is one Terre Haute attorney who has served 
"Uncle Sam" on the water. He quit studyinf; the 
laws of navigation several years ago to take up the 
jjractice of the law that applies to "land-lubbers." It 
cannot be said that he has entirely forgotten his sea-going 
experiences, for Mr. McNutt was in the navy nine years 
after his graduating from Annapolis. 

Following in the footsteps of his father, Judge Cyrus 
McXutt, Mr. McXutt sought the profession which has 
suited him liest. He was born at Franklin, Indiana, and 
attended the ])ublic scliools there, later entering the State 
University at Bloornington, from which he graduated. 
He then received the appointment to Annapolis and spent 
four years in the Academy from which come our Deweys 
and Coghlans. He entered the navy as a midshipman, a 
rank which at that time corres])onded with a lieutenancy 
now. While in the na\v. Mr. McNutt's education was 
greatly broadened bv his travels, as he served nuich of 
his time with the .\siatic squadron. For four years lie 
was stationed at Mare Island, California, in the coast 
survey department. Upon leaving the navy, Mr. McNutt 
began the study of law in the office of his father, and later 
formed a i)artnership with Gilbert McXiUt, his brother, 
the firm being (me of the best known in the city. 

Mr. McNutt is a lover of literature and reads current 
books extensively. He is one of the best jjosled men in 
his profession and enjoys nothing better than delving into 
a case where intricate points of the law arc involved. 



JOHN G. KLUG 



CPI{AKI.\G iif hay lirings us uj) to that eminent *l"erre 
^ Hautean, John G. Kllug. Juhn G. makes a specialty 
of hay. Hay, French fried, frappe or hay a la New- 
burg. Weights and inspection guaranteed and if the 
product doesn't compare favorably with the best selected 
excelsior, money refunded and no questions asked. 

It was along about the time that the Philadelphia Cen- 
tennial was agitating the puljlic mind that John G. Klug 
decided to squander a portion of his career with us here 
on earth. To be exact, the autumn of 1875 was gladdened 
by his arrival. In his early and imripe days, John G. 
dallied a bit with the railroad business, but he soon dis- 
covered that Rockefeller and a few others had bought up 
about everything desirable in this line and he turned his 
attention toward helping the farmers of the hay belt to 
reach accessible and profitable marts with their new mown 
product, which is sung about by Paul Dresser. His first 
hay contract of any considerable size recalls an interesting 
but very damp epoch in the world's history. While it is 
not generally known, nevertheless it is a fact. It was none 
other than John G. who furnished forty-day rations for 
that collection of animals which Noah induced to accom- 
pany him on that memorable, moist occasion. The man- 
ner in which Mr. Klug threw himself in to the breach 
elicited a vote of thanks from the Mt. Siniai Chamber of 
Commerce. The story has often been told that it was for 
King's hay that Mrs. O'Leary's cow was kicking when it 
topplied over the lamp that burned Chicago. Mr. Klug, 
while he could never he persuaded to admit the truth of 
the charge, merely observes that if it is so, the cow knew 
good hay. During intervals when Mr. Klug is not wrest- 
ling with the hay crop of the country, he allows social , 
affairs to claim a share of his attention and his most 
enthusiastic subject is the Knights of Columbus. He is a 
fourth degree member and his efforts for the order have 
made him one of the best known knights in the state. Mr. 
Klugjis ajover of good horse-flesh and when up behind his 
roadster — well, the hay crop then is entirely forgotten. 





JOSIAH THOMAS WALKER 



JOSIAH THOMAS WALKF.R, for the sh(jrt time he has 
worn tile mantle of police judge, has dealt out the law 
in copious doses to many offenders. The man who 
usually felt secure in carrying; concealed weapons has dis- 
carded his. This is all due to Judge Walker enforcing the 
maximum penalty for "totin" a gun. He has the dis- 
tinction of being the first judge in the county to assess the 
full penalty for carrying concealed weapons. One offender 
who had a murder to his credit, was, upon his second 
arrest, given a $500 fine, which meant one year and four 
months in the county workhouse. The prisoner went to 
the workhouse and will ].)robably know better the next 
time than to repeal the same indiscretion. 

Josiah T. Walker is a Hoosier, Worthington, in Greene 
county, being his birthplace. He was on a farm until he 
was twenty-one years of age and then he s])ent five years 
as a country school teacher. He began the study of 
Blackstone in the law office of Wilson & Todd at Bluffton, 
Indiana, after quitting the profession of teaching, and 
remained there three years. Terre Haute first saw the 
judge's genial countenance in the spring of 189.5 when he 
opened a law office here. He was deputy imder William 
Tichenor during the latter's term in the office of prose- 
cutor. I'nder the metropolitan police law he was ap- 
pointed police judge by Mayor Bidaman in 1904. He has 
made an excellent record as jvidge and has conducted the 
office along lines that have been commensurate with the 
importance of the court, strictly following the law. 

He has occupied all of the chairs in Social Lodge Xo. 
86, F. and A. M., and has been a l<.v;d rei)ublicaii all his 
life. 



ALBERT J. STEEN 



/'^OAL is king in Terre Haute and it is not surprising to 
rmd that a large number of tlie men engaged in the 
coal business in Terre Haute were at sonic time in 
their life engaged in railroad work. Of the number who 
have had some experience in the tralTic end of the com- 
mercial world, Mr. Steen is one. 

Down on the Ohio river at fronton, Mr. Steen was born 
in ], 1.1(1. Like a great many other Ohio people, Mr. Steen 
pushed westward with his parents and grew up in Charles- 
ton, Illinois. When the young man was not in school he 
was at the depot, and here he picked up his knowledge of 
telegraphy. He decided on a railroad career and began 
as a messenger boy for the Big Four Company at Charles- 
ton. His first position was as an "extra" telegrapher 
and he was then given a permanent position at Litchfield. 
In his railroad experience Mr. Steen acted as general agent 
for the old Midland at Decatur, was chief clerk in the 
Evansville and Terre Haute and the Chicago and Eastern 
Illinois offices in Terre Haute, and later was chief clerk 
in the auditor's office of the Evansville and Terre Haute 
at Evansville. For one year he was in the grain business 
at Paris, Illinois, moving to Terre Haute and engaging in 
the wholesale and retail coal trade. Mr. Steen is pesident 
of the company that bears his name and is interested in 
several mines in this locality. 

He also has mining interests in the lead and zinc dis- 
tricts of Jophn, and lately secured interests in the Arkansas 
lead and zinc field. Mr. Steen is a member of Post G. of 
the Travelers' Protective Association. His greatest hobby 
is driving and he enjoys this recreation tlioriiui;lilv. 





ROBERT C. SNIDER 



D OBERT C. SNIDER is an old-fashioned sort of a boy 
who isn't carried away by the automobile, except 
occasionally wlien a friend invites him to go along. 
The fad hasn't struck liini yet and he has less trouljle 
dodging it than he does the automobiles themselves. He 
seems to be contented with the old reliable gasohneless 
carriage, with a sleek licjrse attached thereto. His horse 
doesn't like automobiles any better than its owner and 
whenever it sees one, outstrips it in speed, just to show 
its contempt for new-fangled and the so-called competitor. 

While Mr. Snider is a lover of the horse and driving, 
there isn't very much exercise in it and he is obliged to get 
other kinds of recreation. He finds plenty to do in the 
hardware business and sells any amount of the tools tliat 
you see him carrying. He is familiar mth stove pipe and 
mica and can sell you a bill of goods that will include 
every known needed utensil in housekeepin.g, farming or 
carpentering. 

Mr. Snider was born in Terre Haute in the year of tlic 
liig Centennial Exposition. Wlien he left the high school 
he became a salesman in tlie men's furnishing line and for 
several years was located in Indianapolis and later in 
Louisville, l'"or the ])ast six years lie has been in tlic 
retail hardware l)usiness witli liis father. Adam Snider, 
and is a inem1)er of the lirni, 

Mr. Snider is a member of tlie Elks, the Knights of 
Columbus and tlie Young Business Men's Club. 



RUDOLPH YUNG 



■ I 'HE artist has snapped Dr. Yung here as he is out niak- 
in;,' liis priifessional calls. It was very character- 
istic (if the doctor to salute as he did, for he believes 
in ])oliteness, indeed he values it as every gentleman 
should. We have exploited the doctor's greatest hobby. 
He enjoys driving and is an admirer of a good roadster. 

Dr. Yung is the son of the late Charles Yung, one of 
Terre Haute'S best known residents, the latter having been 
engaged for many years here in tlie hotel business. The 
doctor is a graduate of the Terre Haute high school and 
in order to thoroughly fit himself for his professional 
career he attended the college of Physicians and Surgeons 
at Chicago, graduating in 1900. He has had exceptional 
opportunities to advance himself in his profession, serving 
one year as interne at (jne of Chicago's best known hos- 
pitals, wliere he gave consideral)le attention to surgery. 
For two years in Chicago Dr. Yung was associated with 
a well known specialist who has given the major ]5art of 
his time to the study and treatment of diseases of the 
cliest. Dr. Yung began his practice here in 1902. 

Just to be sure that he might live to a ri])e old age and 
accomplish great good for suffering humanity, the doctor 
went to Chicago recently and had his appendix removed. 
This is reassuring to those who imagine they have appendi- 
citis, for the knife can be recommended as a sure cure. 

^\'hile in college Dr. Yung was a memlier of tlie Xu 
Sigma .\u medical fraternity. He is secretary of tlie 
\igo County Medical Societv and is a member of the 
Indiana Medical Association. 




WILLIAM CHARLES ARP 




I 'HIS is a most excellent likeness of William Charles Arp, 
■*■ superintendent of motive power of the X'andalia. Mr. 
Arp is one of the best known railroad men in the 
country, thoroughly progressive and a student in his pro- 
fession. He not only knows all about the different types 
of locomotives on the \'andaha system but has made 
numerous changes in equipment to meet the needs of the 
company. 

Mr. Arp wlis horn June M), 1848, near Willianisport, 
Pennsylvania. He was educated in tlie public schools 
and entered the railway service in 1864 as an apprentice 
on the Northern Central Railway. He was with the Phila- 
delphia and Erie road from 187.S to 1881. as foreman of the 
roundhouse at WilHamsixirl. I'roni 1881 to I88.1 Mr. Arj) 
was foreman of the roundhouse and also foreman of engines 
for the middle division of the same road, still making his 
headquarters at Williamsport. He became foreman of 
the Pennsylvania shops at Indianapolis in I88.1 and con- 
tinued in that position until 1886, when he accepted a 
similar position for the Pennsy at Columbus, Ohio. Mr. 
Arp was master mechanic of the shops at I.ogansport four 
years and held the same position at the Dennison shops 
for five years. He came to Terre Haute as superintendent 
of motive power in 1896. 

Mr. Arp is a member of the American Railway Master 
Mechanics Association and recently was a dele.gate to the 
International Railway Congress at ^^'ashington. He has 
an extensive actpiaintance among railway officials as well 
as among business men in different cities with whom he 
transacts business in the purchase of equi])ment and suj) 
plies. Mr. Arp is a member of the Country Club and 
enjoys golf as a recreation, but makes no jiretense as an 
expert on the links. 



GARDNER F. WELLS 



MR. WELLS, whom we see here spiking down another 
interurban line, is the general manager of the Terre 
Haute Traction and Light Company. Under his 
administration of affairs there has been less walking in 
Terre Haute than ever before, and he promises to mingle 
town and country closer than ever when the Sullivan and 
Paris interurbans are completed. There are few things 
that have benefitted the city more than the interurban 
trolley hnes. Where it used to take the farmer three hours 
to get to town with old Dobbin, he now boards a big 
seventy-foot car in front of his house and reaches the city 
in less time than it takes to hitch U]> to the buggy and get 
to the first cross roads. 

Mr. Wells comes from Boston, having lieen born in the 
great bean center, and near enough to the Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology to catch the spirit of its enterprise 
and progressiveness. He entered this splendid school, 
and upon completing his electrical and mechanical course 
accepted a position with the Thompson & Houston Elec- 
trical Company at Lynn. He fitted himself especially for 
electrical engineering and construction. He was first 
superintendent of the Lowell, Massachusetts street railway, 
then became general manager of the South Shore and 
Boston lines which had seventy-five miles of mileage. 
Then he accepted a position with the Stone & Webster 
Company of Boston. This company operates street rail- 
way systems in about twenty-five different cities and the 
first system Mr. Wells was placed in charge of was the 
Brockton and Plymouth road. Mr. Wells came to Terre 
Haute in 1903. The CHnton line has been completed 
since then and lines are now building to Sullivan, Indiana, 
and Paris, Illinois. With the new interurban the local 
system will have one hundred miles of track. Employ- 
ment is given three hundred and fifty men and improve- 
ments are constantly going on under Mr. Wells' direction 
that will mean a better system than that of any city of its 
size in the coimtry. Mr. ^\'ells finds his greatest pleasure 
in inspecting other properties, getting in contact with the 
most modern electric railway construction ideas, and to sum 
it all up — he is thoroughly in love with his chosen profession. 





WILLIAM C. DOWNING 



IV yiR. DOWNING, superintendent of the main line of 
■^ ■^ the Vandalia has one holiby, and that one is "watch- 
ing the track." He enjoys notliing better tlian 
making an inspection trip and doesn't object if he makes 
the inspeciton as we see him here, seated in the big wicker 
chair on the observation car. One of his duties is to see 
that the Hne is well maintained. This insures the excel- 
lent east and west service for which the \'andalia is noted. 

The next day after leaving Jiarlham college at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, Mr. Downing started out on his railroad 
career and he lias been at it ever since. Mr. Downing 
occupies first position in 1885 in tlie engineering depart- 
ment of the Pennsylvania system. He was identified with 
the engineering end of railroading on the different divisions 
of the company until 1901, when he was promoted to the 
superintendency of the Peoria division of the Vandaha. 
He evidently made an excellent impression with the 
officials farther up, for it was but a few months later until 
he was transferred to his present place as superintendent 
of the main line. Mr. Downing's position brings him 
in direct contact with practically all of the trainmen on 
the main line. He feels an interest in tlieir welfare and 
success and naturally is one of the most ])o|)ular su])erin- 
tendents tliat the main line has ever had. 

Mr. Downing is a native of Richmond, Indiana, having 
been born in that Quaker city in 1865. There is just a 
little bit of the Quaker stock in Mr. Downing. He first 
came to Terre Haute in 1896, from St. I.ouis and joined 
the \'andalia family here. Railroad work affords Uttle 
time for the indulgence of fads and hobbies, so Mr. Down- 
ing finds his greatest ])leasure in liis work. He enjoys 
hunting as a recreation. He is a Mason and a member of 
the Knights Templar at Richnwmd. 



JOHN C RUTHERFORD 



TIRIXG of tlie tall uncut timber in the northern part 
of Ontario, the subject of this sketch early hastened 
to the close-cropped lawns of civilization. He 
lioarded a train for Ontario and when he reached the 
metropolis of the king's dominion began looking for em- 
ployment. His fate was sealed when he entered the print- 
ing offices for a canny old Scotchman and applied for a 
position. He wanted to set type immediately, but as his 
early education had been somewhat meager owing to the 
scarcity of school houses in his home locality, he first 
washed rollers, fed presses and attended night school, be- 
fore he began to master the art preservative. 

When he had learned the difference between a "type 
louse ' and a slug, he crossed the line, first settling in 
Michigan. He had an all-round experience on a coimtry 
weekly and had visions of running a daily paper. One 
was for sale cheap in Indiana, at Bluffton. Mr. Ruther- 
ford and a brother ran this paper until its ribs began 
sticking out. It was carefully nursed and immense quan- 
tities of oxygen administered to it, but without avail. 
The paper died a natural death. There was no field in 
Bluffton and none could be created. It was then that 
.Mr. Rutherford came to Terre Haute. He began his news- 
jiaper career here on the old Express and was its city 
editor for several years. He is handy with the shears and 
can get out more copy without the aid of an onion than 
any other newspaper man in the town. Incidentally. 
Mr. Rutherford has a nose for news, which is also quite 
essential. 

Three years ago he left the daily field to enter the job 
printing business. He is also associated with Don M. 
Xixon as a partner in the editing and ownership of the 
Spectator, a newsy weekly sheet that fills a place in hun- 
dreds of homes every Saturday. Mr. Rutherford was one 
of the men instrumental in the establishment of the Daily 
Tribune, aiding in the securing of its circulation before a 
single copy of the paper was off the press, later being em- 
ployed in the editorial department. 



No-ricE 
FOR -..-T'.S'^^I'^'^CE 





EDWARD REISS 



AVJE see Dr. Reiss here just as he lias completed the 
extraction of a big molar from the jaw of a patient 
who has been led to lielieve that there is no such 
thing as painless dentistry. Dr. Reiss has the reputation 
and deserves it, of being the only "painless puller" in the 
world. Patients have to be restrained from getting all 
of their teeth drawn after the doctor has extracted just 
one. He is not anxious to pull every tooth, for a few of 
them have to be filled and crowned. The dentist of the 
present day is a beautifier of faces and if it is a gold filling 
or a crown that the doctor gives you, it will be a real 
pleasure during the years that follow for you to view your 
smiling and sparkling reflection in any mirror that chances 
to be handy. It is then that you love the dentist. 

Dr. Reiss is a Sucker, but in name only. He was born 
in Shelbyville, Illinois, in 1876, the same year that Phila- 
delphia held the Centennial. He was graduated from the 
high school there and then attended the I'niversity of 
Kentucky, where he received a di]iIoma from the dental 
department. Dr. Reiss then decided to locate in Terre 
Haute, and could not have selected a better town. He 
has met with splendid success. 

Shortly after his graduation at Louisville he was luiitecl 
in marriage with a Louisville girl. Miss May B(jllingcr. 
Two children, a boy and a girl, add to the happiness of the 
doctor's home. His great fad is floriculture and the doctor 
is never happier than when lie is cultivating his .'\merican 
Beauty roses or Tlmnuis Lawson carnations. He likes 
gardening, too, and su])plies his table with vegetables that 
he cares for himself in the early hours of morning and at 
sundown. Dr. Reiss is a member of Masonic lodge No. 
19 and the Knights of Pythias, Occidental lodge. 



JOHN E. BEGGS 



""PHE jMddle iipiin which Mr. Hegjjs is leaning is an instru- 
•^ ment of liard manual lahor, anil has lieen used many 
a time bv its owner. This is the selfsame ])addle, 
made of hard sugar wood, that Mr. Beggs used when he 
bade the folks at home good-bye and started off to Coving- 
ton, Kentucky, intent upon making the world yield him 
the living which it owed. While Mr. Beggs was using this 
paddle to good advantage in making distillery yeast, he 
became just a little bit better in this particular line than a 
great many others, and as a consequence paddled his own 
canoe along in good shape. It wasn't s<j nnich the physical 
effort required in making the yeast, as it was in "knowing 
how," and this is really the secret of success. Mr. Beggs 
found the secret and nobody regrets it, because he is a good 
fellow and deserving. 

Mr. Beggs was born at Laurel. Indiana, in 1861, and 
moved to Shelbyville while yet a small boy. Upon grad- 
uating from the high school he entered the business in 
which his father, the late John Beggs, had made such a 
distinct success. He was located in Cincinnati and Chi- 
cago in the distilling business before coming to Terre Haute 
in 1886. He was first connected with the \\'abash dis- 
tillery and later superintended the construction of the 
Majestic plant. Mr. Beggs was instrumental in the build- 
ing of the Commercial Distillery, one of the finest and 
largest independent plants in the world. He is president 
and general manager of the Commercial Distilling Com- 
pany. 

Mr. Beggs is one of the best known and best liked citizens 
of the town. The social side of his nature is well developed 
and his acquaintance is extensive in other cities. He is 
one of the best informed men in the country in the dis- 
tilling business. Mr. Beggs is a member of the local lodge 
of Elks and is a thorough and loyal Terre Hautean. 





ELLSWORTH LAWRENCE 



IV /I R. LAW^RENCE is not necessarily a gloomy man 
Ijecause lie is a manufacturer of caskets. Tliey are 
essential to the welfare of tlie living and Mr. Law- 
rence is very much interested in seeing that he makes a 
living by honest labor. The demand for the output of 
tlie factory depends largely on tlie mortality and Mr. 
Lawrence never speculates aljoul llic future. He is Imund 
to sell a casket every once in a while and dnesn'l worrv. 
It's a matter that's up to the public. 

Mr. Lawrence was born right near tlie line that divides 
Clay and \'igo counties, only it lia]i|)ened that the mo- 
mentuous event took ])lace in Clay county. As the 
metropolis of \igo county was the nearest, Mr. Lawrence 
was really never a Clay county man in the fullest sense of 
the word. He had some experience in coralling the lowing 
kine at night and in fnUowing the cultivator liefore he 
attended tlie Terre Haute liigh sclmol. He was graduated 
from this institution and then became a full Hedged resi- 
dent of Terre Haute. He learned liis trade at the jilant 
of the Central Manufacturing Company, and was in the 
casket department seven years. He next assisted in the 
organization of the Terre Haute Casket Companv, liucom- 
ing secretary and manager of the factory. 

Mr. Lawrence is an enthusiastic member of the Knights 
of Pythias and belongs to Paul Revere lodge. He is 
interested in the Uniform Rank Ciim])anv, Xo. 8,1, and is 
its first lieutenant. 



NORBERT C. KINTZ 



r^R( )M the time Mr. Kintz \vas a bov and used lo jjlav 
on rafts in the old canal at Tenth and Walnut streets 
he has had an ambition to |)ossess a jilanins; mill that 
would be a model in every res]iect. Since he has accom- 
plished largely what he started out to do, we can pardon 
his pride in the matter. Mr. Kintz and his mill are almost 
inseparalile, so the artist has associated them here. 

Mr. P. C. Kintz, father of the subject of this sketch, was 
in the contracting business in Terre Haute for a good many 
years and the son followed in his footsteps. Mr. Kintz's 
first work was in the contracting line and he did not enga,ge 
in the manufacturing end of the lumljer business until 
1895, when he started the plaining mill at Tenth and Craw- 
ford streets. With an increasing volume of business and 
feeling the need of better facilities, Mr. Kintz began ])lan- 
ning for the erection of a new mill which would he one of 
the most complete in the country. His jjresent factory 
was erected in 1901. Its equipment throughout is most 
thorough and the machiner)' facilities remarkable. Econ- 
omy in time and labor was aimed at, and as a consetjunece 
everything in the mill is of the most modern construction. 
Doors, sash, office fixtures, and special furniture work is 
turned out and the plant is ime of tlie busiest in the city. 

Besides being proprietor of the mill, Mr. Kintz is \ ice- 
president and general manager of the A'igo Lumber Com- 
pany. With his time pretty well occupied, Mr. Kintz 
enjoys a baseball game pretty well and is a great lover of 
the driving horse. He is an Elk, a member of the Knights 
of Columbus and the Travelers Protective Association. 




INDEX 









PAGE 








p.\GE 










Abbott, C. U 191 


Bronson, H. () 6.i 


Davis, C. E. 


Akers, M. P. 






264 


Brown, 8. C. 






256 


Davis, C. S. 








Albrecht, W. H., j . 






114 


Brown, W, W, . 






74 


Davis, D. \. 








Alden, E. G. 






284 


Bryant, K. K, 






68 


Davis, G 








Arnett, \V. L. 






247 


Bncl<in';lKini, Iv M. 






238 


Davis, j. I.. 








Arp, W. C. 






2Q6 


Budil, 1, !•: 






136 


Davis, ( ). D. 








Ball, S. K. 






6 


Bucid, S, C, 






214 


Deneliie, J. W. 








Ball, \V. C. 






147 


Bntk-r, 1.. C. 






37 


Derry, ( 1. G. 








Ballantine, J. W. 






164 


Caldwell, V. A. . 






178 


Dix, G. ( ). . 








Harcus, J. S. 






248 


Campbell, I''. L. . 






154 


Doak, W. C. 








liatt, C. S. 






57 


Catlin, R, H, 






121 


Dorsey, W. C. 








Baur, A. \-. 






52 


Cavins, .\. C, 






246 


Downing, W. C. 






Hoal, l\ W. 






266 


Cheek. Dr. j. 11. 






118 


Dudley, A. W. 






Measley, J. T. 






252 


Clark, William 






77 


Duenweg, W. S. 






Beggs, H. W. 






286 


Cleary, .l.j. 






152 


Duftin, C. R, 






Beggs, J. E. 






.'.ni 


Clift. F. M. 






22 


Duncan, W. H . 






Beggs, T. G. 






16.1 


Condis, Dr. M. R. 






244 


Dunkin. I'. M. 






Bell, Dr. \V. E. . 






84 


Condit, H. A. 






66 


F^lirrnann, C. H. 






Berry, \V. H. 






146 


Connelly, .|. R. . 






215 


Elder, I. G. 






Bidaman, E. .1 . 






5 


Conratli, Frank 






90 


Ely, W. G. 






Bindley, Nuniiaii 






116 


Cooper, J. A., Jr. 






43 


Epperl, \V. E. 






Blair, W. P. 






199 


Cowan, E. B. 






91 


Fagan, J.j. 






Bledsoe, L. D. . 






83 


Cox, J. E. . 






123 


I'ailey, B. F. 






Bogart, P. N. 






262 


Cox, J. S. . 






184 


Fairbanks, Crawford 






Boggs, Harrv 






20o 


Cox, W. \. 






106 


Fairbanks, E. P. 






Boor, Dr. M. A. . 






216 


Crane, G. M. 






254 


Faris, G. \V. 






Bowers, C. G. 






27 


Crawford, F. C. . 






225 


Farrington, G. E. 






Boyll, W. H. 






249 


Crawford, J. A. 






234 


Fasig. Daniel 






Bresett, S. J. 






209 


Crawford, .1. I.. . 






165 


Filbeck, Nicholas 






Briggs, Herbert 






204 


Cronin. W. F. 






231 


Filbeck, R. X. 






Bronson, D. R. . 






28 


Dailey, J. A. 






124 


I'inkclstein, J. R. 









Fisbeck, F. C. 

Fleming, C. [, 

Foley, P. M. 

Fortune, E. R. 

Foster, A. Z. 

Fox, Charles 

Freeman, W. j 

Gagg, G. A. 

Gartland, P. V 
Gilbert, F. L. 
Goldman, B. A. 
Goldsmith, A. F. 
Goldsmith, F. C. 
Goodman, M. T. 
Gray, S. E. 
Greenburg, vS. T. 
Grosjean, C. F. . 
Gwinn, D. R. 
Haggerty, P, W"., J 
Halstead, W. L. 
Hamilton, W. K. 
Hammerstein, C. G 
Hampton, Harrv 
Hartenfels, C. L. 
Haupt, C, F. 
Hedges, J. M. 
Hendrich, ^\'. E 
Henry, D. \\\ 
Herz, A. 
Herz, M. E. 
Hice, W. B. 
Hidden, M. T. 
Higgins, A. M. 



PAGE 




72 


Hoerman, F. E. . 


288 


HolTman, G. W. 


289 


Huffman, G. W". J. 


150 


Holden, J. C. 


253 


HoUoway, G. G. . 


111 


Hornung, O. C. 


280 


Horsley, \V. E. . 


259 


Hughes, L. G. 


201 


Hulman, Herman, J 


64 


Htmter, C. R. 


103 


Hussey, Warren . 


142 


Hutton, H. H. 


260 


Jamison, C. B. . 


80 


Jenckes, J. S., Jr. 


13 


Jenkins, Dr. W. (). 


188 


Jones, F. B. 


189 


Kaufman, W. W. 


223 


Kehoe, T, M. 


75 


Kelley, C. A. 


211 


Kidder, X. S. 


129 


Kiefner, E. A. 


212 


Kinser, H, L. 


158 


Kinser, W. J. 


88 


Kintz, C. J. 


61 


Kintz, X. C. 


227 


Kirk, C. H. . 


271 


Klug, J. G. . 


16 


Krietenstein, G. W. 


14 


Lamb, J. E. 


277 


Landrum, |. W. . 


107 


Larkins, Dr. E. L. 


2.^ 


Lawrence, Ellsworth 


210 


Lawrence, M. R. 



PAGE 




243 


Layman, E. W. 


46 


Lee, H. A. . 


119 


Leonard, E. F. . 


208 


LeTellier, A. A. 


131 


Link, M. M. 


213 


Lints, G, M. 


79 


McAlhster, E. B. 


65 


McCabe, C. F. 


42 


-McCall, Dr. James 


54 


McKeen, C. E. 


198 


McKeen, Frank . 


36 


McKeen, S. C. 


38 


iMcKeen, W. R. . 


224 


McKeever, W. E. 


86 


McXamara, T. E. 


102 


McXutt, F. A. 


273 


McPeak, J. M. 


29 


McPeak, W. L. . 


171 


Madison, J. S. 


115 


Maier, George 


153 


Marshall C. \V. . 


217 


Mattox, Dr. \V. R. 


132 


Mayer, H. A. 


181 


Mechling, J. E. . 


303 


Meginnes, H. E. . 


26 


Mewhinney, C. A. 


291 


Mewhinney, O. C. 


50 


Meyers, ^Lirx 


9 


.Meyers, W. M. 


135 


Miller, A. L. 


233 


Miller, C. A. 


302 


Miller, F. B. 


237 


Miller, F. H. 



PAGE 

161 









PAGE 








PAGE 








Millrr, J. H 162 


Ray, W. P. .... 245 


Soutli, E. E 


MillcT, R. ( ). 






230 


Ray, W. W. 






174 


Spang, H. M. 






Milks, j. Iv 






122 


Rciman, E. E. 






36 


Sparks, E. M. 






Mocrhead. Dr. '1'. \V. 






9') 


Rciss, Dr. Edward 






300 


Steeg, D. B. 






Morris, G. G. 






4S 


Reading, I. G. . 






95 


Steeg, H. C. 






.M(irris, \V. H. . . 






222 


Reagan, D. E. 






71 


Steele, M. A. 






Mottier, H. A. 






274 


Reynolds, C. G. . 






58 


Steele, W. B. 






Naltkemiier, G. J. 






186 


Rhodes, E. C. 






190 


Steen, A. J. 






Neuki.ni. .\fli,l]ili 






151 


Richards, B. |. . 






60 


Swango, J. H. 






Nciik..iii. Ikiiry . 






41 


Richardson. I. W., |r. 






112 


Tabor, Dr. F. A. 






Ncutiin. R. V. . 






156 


Riddle, J. I. 






148 


Talley, H. B, 






Nicliols, Ur. W. A. 






44 


Reihm, G. J. 






120 


Thickstun, G. E. 






Niclioson, A. G. . 






276 


Rodenbeck, E, F. 






62 


Thompson, H. G. 






Norris, A. R. 






194 


Roney, W. S. 






263 


Thompson, R. B. 






O'Brien. Kchvard 






287 


Root, C. J. . 






182 


Townley, H. P. . 






Paddock, J. R. . 






17 


Roseman, H. H. 






113 


Tyler. C. I.. 






Raise, \V. R. 






180 


Rossell, G. C. 






168 


Tune, H. E. 






Parker, T. A. 






21 


Royse, H. E. 






78 


Uffenheimer, Signnmd 






Parks, J. W. 






240 


Royse, S. D. 






236 


Urban, C. A. 






Parsons, W. W. . 






281 


Rutherford. J. C 






299 


Vannier, H. E. 






Patton, Dr. Charles 






187 


Ryan, F. M. 






278 


Vaughan, A. W. . 






Payne, C. H. 






96 


Schaal, G. A., Jr. 






32 


Vaughan, Dr. J. C. 






Pendleton, A. D. 






185 


Schell, Dr. Walker 






285 


Vickroy, J. M. 






Penn, William 






98 


Schloss, H. T. 






138 


Walker, J. T. 






Peyton, J. E. 






235 


Segar. S. L. 






73 


Wallace, H. S. 






Peyton. \V. P. 






94 


Shaley, Dr. F. W. 






270 


Walsh, E. J. 






Pfan. A. I.. 






108 


Shaw, J. G. 






55 


Walsh, J. B. 






Piety. J. K. 






241 


Shirkie, H. H. 






157 


Walsh, Maurice . 






Piety, J. (). 






206 


Smith, A. N. 






176 


Watson, D. L. 






Prager, Samuel. 






232 


Smith, F. B. 






221 


Weber, H. E. 






Piigh, C. G. 






117 


Smith, J. L. 






89 


Webster, B. T. . 






Raidy, O. E. 






140 


Smith, L. D. 






33 


Weinstein, L. E. . 






Ray, F. W. 






218 


Snider, Robert 






294 


Weinstein, R. A. 







9912 



PACE PACE PAGE 

Wells, O. !■■ 297 Wiley, W. H 10 Wcicd, D. R 173 

Whilaker, W. J 100 Williams, H. L. ... 51 Woodburn, T. R. ... 242 

White, J.N 197 Yung, Dr. Rudolph ... 295 



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